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SCIENCE
August 8, 2013 | By Julie Cart
A federal report released this week resolved an obscure argument: Which large-scale solar technology requires the most land? The inside-baseball question is common among solar power developers. Those who espouse solar thermal technology frequently point out that their "power tower" plants require less land than a large photovoltaic facility using solar panels. The Energy Department report affirms that, but found little appreciable difference between the two technologies' footprints.
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SCIENCE
August 8, 2013 | By Julie Cart
A federal report released this week resolved an obscure argument: Which large-scale solar technology requires the most land? The inside-baseball question is common among solar power developers. Those who espouse solar thermal technology frequently point out that their "power tower" plants require less land than a large photovoltaic facility using solar panels. The Energy Department report affirms that, but found little appreciable difference between the two technologies' footprints.
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OPINION
September 1, 1991
Once again, California is on the cutting edge of a technology that could change the way the world lives. Except for nuclear power plants, everything that generates electricity uses sunlight that nature has stored in some fashion. Even windmills are beholden to the sun for the movement of air from cooler to warmer areas.
NATIONAL
July 8, 2013 | By Devin Kelly
The pilots of the first solar-powered plane to fly across America hope to transform the momentum of their historic flight into a grand-scale push for clean technology.       Solar Impulse pilot and project president Bertrand Piccard said his team was “elated” by the smooth landing at New York's John F. Kennedy International Airport on Saturday night from an aviation and a renewable-energy standpoint. “It really shows our clean-technology solar energy and our new systems have been reliable,” he said in an interview with the Los Angeles Times.
BUSINESS
June 17, 2008 | From Times Wire Services
Intel Corp. plans to spin off its solar technology business, creating a company called SpectraWatt Inc. and contributing to a $50-million investment in the venture. SpectraWatt will open a plant in Oregon in the second half of the year that will make photovoltaic cells and develop ways to cut the cost of solar technology, Intel said. Shipments will probably start in the middle of 2009, Intel said.
BUSINESS
February 25, 1989 | DONALD WOUTAT, Times Staff Writer
Atlantic Richfield acknowledged Friday that it is looking for a buyer for Arco Solar Inc., the subsidiary that Arco built into the world's leading producer of photovoltaic cells after buying a small solar firm amid much hoopla in 1977. Describing the growth of the solar market as unacceptably slow because energy prices haven't climbed nearly as high as some had projected in the 1970s, Arco said it is discussing the sale of all or part of Arco Solar with "a number of companies."
NATIONAL
July 8, 2013 | By Devin Kelly
The pilots of the first solar-powered plane to fly across America hope to transform the momentum of their historic flight into a grand-scale push for clean technology.       Solar Impulse pilot and project president Bertrand Piccard said his team was “elated” by the smooth landing at New York's John F. Kennedy International Airport on Saturday night from an aviation and a renewable-energy standpoint. “It really shows our clean-technology solar energy and our new systems have been reliable,” he said in an interview with the Los Angeles Times.
BUSINESS
January 16, 1992 | Researched by DALLAS M. JACKSON / Los Angeles Times
Employees of the South Coast Air Quality Management District will get more of a charge out of driving to work this summer-if they happen to drive an electric car. Using a promising new solar-cell technology developed by Southern California Edison Co. and Texas Instruments, Irvine-based Fluor Corp. is working with Edison to build a "solar carport" at the AQMD's headquarters in Diamond Bar. Like conventional solar cells, the new Texas Instruments cells convert sunlight directly into electricity.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 9, 1985 | HERBERT A. SAMPLE, Times Staff Writer
Robert A. Felburg is not your ordinary real estate developer. He'll tell you that. His friends will tell you that. His enemies will tell you that. At 64, Felburg has earned a reputation as one of the most eccentric businessmen in Ventura County. After all, how many other developers would send reporters a letter spelling out their substantial financial troubles? Or write articles advocating a quarantine of victims of AIDS?
BUSINESS
July 3, 2006 | Charles Piller, Times Staff Writer
Over the years, the Palo Alto Research Center has developed numerous electricity-gobbling innovations. Now the storied lab that gave the world laser printing and graphical user interfaces is trying to harness the sun to power its inventions. The Xerox Corp.
BUSINESS
March 22, 2010 | By Tiffany Hsu
On a dirt plot near Bakersfield where a massive refinery once churned out gasoline and asphalt, one of the world's largest oil companies is looking for something more green. On Monday, Chevron Corp. plans to reveal that it has transformed the 8-acre site into a sprawling test facility with 7,700 solar panels. The panels, in various sizes, represent seven cutting-edge photovoltaic technologies from seven companies that Chevron is checking out as possible candidates to power its operations worldwide.
BUSINESS
June 17, 2008 | From Times Wire Services
Intel Corp. plans to spin off its solar technology business, creating a company called SpectraWatt Inc. and contributing to a $50-million investment in the venture. SpectraWatt will open a plant in Oregon in the second half of the year that will make photovoltaic cells and develop ways to cut the cost of solar technology, Intel said. Shipments will probably start in the middle of 2009, Intel said.
BUSINESS
July 3, 2006 | Charles Piller, Times Staff Writer
Over the years, the Palo Alto Research Center has developed numerous electricity-gobbling innovations. Now the storied lab that gave the world laser printing and graphical user interfaces is trying to harness the sun to power its inventions. The Xerox Corp.
BUSINESS
March 2, 1992 | ROBERT MORAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
High above Earth, more and more satellites are being powered by gallium arsenide solar cells--cells that are lighter, longer-lasting and more efficient than any made from silicon, the industry standard. Ninety-nine percent of the market for gallium arsenide solar cells belongs to Applied Solar Energy Corp., a solar and optical technologies firm based in the City of Industry, which has placed its business future behind the compound semiconductor material.
BUSINESS
January 16, 1992 | Researched by DALLAS M. JACKSON / Los Angeles Times
Employees of the South Coast Air Quality Management District will get more of a charge out of driving to work this summer-if they happen to drive an electric car. Using a promising new solar-cell technology developed by Southern California Edison Co. and Texas Instruments, Irvine-based Fluor Corp. is working with Edison to build a "solar carport" at the AQMD's headquarters in Diamond Bar. Like conventional solar cells, the new Texas Instruments cells convert sunlight directly into electricity.
OPINION
September 1, 1991
Once again, California is on the cutting edge of a technology that could change the way the world lives. Except for nuclear power plants, everything that generates electricity uses sunlight that nature has stored in some fashion. Even windmills are beholden to the sun for the movement of air from cooler to warmer areas.
BUSINESS
August 27, 1989
So Arco, the giant oil company, is turning a quick profit by selling its advanced solar energy technology abroad! Here is a company that used $4.5 million of U.S. funds and $900,000 of California funds, plus uncounted millions in state and federal tax breaks on energy, to develop the first commercially competitive solar energy system. Then, after building and putting into operation two solar power plants in California, Arco sells this technology to a West German corporation, pocketing along the way the money contributed by California and U.S. taxpayers.
BUSINESS
February 21, 1991 | PATRICK LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush's proposed National Energy Strategy, released Wednesday, warms the hearts of the oil, nuclear and auto industries. But the plan is cold comfort to companies that install conservation equipment and firms that generate solar or other alternative forms of energy. "There seems to be an emphasis on conventional fossil fuels as the future energy supply," said Kathleen Flanagan, director of government relations at Luz International, a Westwood-based solar energy company.
NEWS
December 11, 1990 | JOHN LAIDLER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
On a recent rainy day, J. Edward Sunderland stood next to a weedy field here, pointing to the site of a project he hopes will help the nation in its quest for energy independence. If all goes well, the drab-looking field, on the campus of the University of Massachusetts at Amherst, will one day contain an array of solar collectors capable of supplying heat and hot water year-round to a future 12,000-seat sports arena, along with an existing gymnasium building.
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