Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSolar Wind
IN THE NEWS

Solar Wind

FEATURED ARTICLES
SCIENCE
October 15, 2012 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times
Analyzing grains of soil collected from three Apollo lunar missions, geochemists have figured out that the hydrogen in trace amounts of water on the moon's surface probably came from solar wind, the outflow of positively-charged hydrogen from the sun. For decades, scientists didn't find much hydrogen in the lunar samples that had been returned to Earth, said Yan Liu, a research professor at the University of Tennessee and lead author of the lunar...
ARTICLES BY DATE
SCIENCE
November 11, 2013 | By Deborah Netburn
Less than three weeks before comet ISON's closest encounter with the sun, the comet is now sporting a cool double tail. Like those of most comets, ISON's dramatic tail is growing as it moves closer to the sun. That's because the warmth of the sun is releasing gas and dust that were frozen in the comet's nucleus. (If you have a few minutes, check out the the Jet Propulsion Laboratory's  incredible video about this process.) PHOTOS: Comet ISON journeys through the solar system A double tail on a comet is actually not such an unusual thing, said Sky & Telescope senior editor Alan MacRobert in an interview with the Los Angeles Times.
Advertisement
SCIENCE
May 9, 2011 | By Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times
The 2004 crash-landing of a returning NASA space capsule in the deserts of Utah had scientists fearing for a while that samples collected by the Genesis mission, sent to capture particles from the sun's solar wind, were lost. But much of the collected material survived the crash, and it's now turning up surprises: discrepancies between the composition of the sun and the inner solar system, which contains the sun's four closest planets, including Earth. The early report, published online Monday in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, shows among other things that the pattern of isotopes in the solar wind — and thus, presumably, the sun — is very different from that of the inner planets.
SCIENCE
August 27, 2013 | By Amina Khan
Scientists using a NASA instrument aboard an Indian spacecraft have discovered signs of water native to the moon - not brought from far away, but water that must have been locked beneath the lunar crust since its birth. The discovery by the ill-fated Chandrayaan-1 lunar probe represents the first time researchers have found signs of native water remotely. The results, published in the journal Nature Geoscience, offer further evidence that the moon has its own indigenous source of water.
SCIENCE
December 14, 2010 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
Voyager 1, the little spacecraft that could, is nearing the edge of the solar system and continuing to prove theorists wrong about solar wind ? the massive outflow of particles produced by the sun. The tiny spacecraft, launched 33 years ago, is now 10.8 billion miles from Earth and has reached the region of the solar system where the hot ionized gas, or plasma, emitted by the sun is ramming into the cold gas and dust of interstellar space and...
NEWS
November 2, 1994 | From Associated Press
A NASA spacecraft called Wind rocketed into orbit Tuesday on a three-year journey to study the electrified particles that stream from the sun. The unmanned Delta rocket blasted off from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, 10 miles from the Kennedy Space Center, where shuttle Atlantis awaits a Thursday launch. Eight instruments--six U.S., one French and the first Russian instrument to fly on an American spacecraft--will analyze solar wind, the energy hurtling from the sun at more than 1 million m.
NEWS
July 19, 1985 | From Associated Press
A man-made comet launched over the Pacific Ocean on Wednesday night was visible from Texas to Peru, and scientists called the experiment a success Thursday, despite a fire that destroyed a NASA observation plane on the ground.
SCIENCE
December 7, 2007 | John Johnson Jr., Times Staff Writer
Data from the Japanese Hinode spacecraft have confirmed that a set of long-theorized magnetic waves help power the solar wind that drives charged particles to the frigid boundary of the solar system. Called Alfven waves in honor of the Swedish scientist who proposed their existence 60 years ago, they play an important role in accelerating the solar wind to speeds of about 2 million mph, according to results published today in the journal Science.
NEWS
April 12, 1993 | From Associated Press
Discovery's astronauts heaved a glistening, gold-colored spacecraft into orbit Sunday for two days of solar study. "Sure was pretty to see that thing go," Commander Kenneth Cameron said. The $6-million reusable spacecraft, about the size of a large air conditioner, should be retrieved by the crew Tuesday. Called Spartan, it contains two telescopes for observing the sun's blazing halo, or corona.
SCIENCE
March 11, 2012 | By Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times
The chest-high rack of electronics Justin Kasper is assembling in a Massachusetts office park will fit in a shoe box before he's done. It won't be much to look at - a few inches across, shaped rather like a coffee cup attached to a Kindle - but to Kasper, it'll serve as eyes across nearly 100 million miles of space. In less than seven years, that cup will be journeying to the center of the solar system to scoop up bits of the sun. "This really has been a life's dream," said Kasper, of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics in Cambridge, Mass.
SCIENCE
July 10, 2013 | By Eryn Brown
Scientists working on NASA's Interstellar Boundary Explorer mission have nabbed their first direct glimpse of the so-called heliotail, the long trailing edge of the solar wind. Much to their surprise, three years of data from IBEX, as the Earth-orbiting craft is known, showed that the tail has a sort of clover shape, with separate "lobes" of faster- and slower-moving solar wind. The scientists detailed their discovery in a study in the Astrophysical Journal and during an online news media event ( video available here )
SCIENCE
March 20, 2013 | By Monte Morin and Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times
It was welcome news to Earthlings: The Voyager 1 spacecraft had seemingly crossed a momentous threshold and become the first man-made object to enter interstellar space. "Voyager 1 has left the solar system," the American Geophysical Union declared Wednesday in a news release. An accompanying study published online in the organization's journal, Geophysical Research Letters, also contained an unusually sentimental end note declaring that "we did it. Bon Voyage!" Alas, the elation that spread through news and social media was short-lived.
SCIENCE
December 3, 2012 | By Amy Hubbard, This post has been corrected. See the note below for details.
Voyager 1 is this close to interstellar space -- probably. On its way out of our solar system, the spacecraft has stumbled across a surprise: a "magnetic highway" that represents a brand-new, unexpected layer between here and out there. This new layer, scientists said Monday morning, provides hints of interstellar space. Edward Stone, Voyager project scientist, told reporters at the American Geophysical Union meeting in San Francisco on Monday that particles were "zipping in and out on this magnetic highway.
SCIENCE
December 3, 2012 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times
Voyager 1, the spacecraft famous for beaming back striking photos of Jupiter, Saturn and their moons more than 30 years ago, has made still another surprising discovery: the existence of an unexpected zone at the very edge of the solar system. It had been thought that the NASA probe was already passing through the outermost section of the solar system on its way toward the heliopause - the boundary where the solar wind ends and interstellar space begins. For that reason, the existence of yet another district at our cosmic neighborhood's edge was completely unexpected, said Stamatios Krimigis, a solar physicist at the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory in Laurel, Md., and leader of the team that operates Voyager's low-energy charged particle instrument.
SCIENCE
October 15, 2012 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times
Analyzing grains of soil collected from three Apollo lunar missions, geochemists have figured out that the hydrogen in trace amounts of water on the moon's surface probably came from solar wind, the outflow of positively-charged hydrogen from the sun. For decades, scientists didn't find much hydrogen in the lunar samples that had been returned to Earth, said Yan Liu, a research professor at the University of Tennessee and lead author of the lunar...
SCIENCE
August 15, 2012 | By Monte Morin
A  panel of science experts has called for the creation of a larger and better equipped National Space Weather Program, citing the potentially catastrophic effects of extreme solar eruptions. On Wednesday, members of the National Research Council released a report on solar and space physics that outlined a series of program recommendations for the next 10 years. Among their suggestions was rechartering the nation's space weather program at a “higher, more important level,” according to report chairman Daniel Baker of the University of Colorado.
MAGAZINE
May 17, 1992 | Judith Sims
It's one thing to board a cruise ship as big as the Trump Tower and go barging off into the sea equipped with swimming pools, shuffleboard and orchestras. A more serene (and environmentally friendly) alternative is the wind- and sun-powered 37-foot Solar Wind trimaran, which plies the Sea of Cortez between Baja California and Mexico, cruising quietly. (The three-hulled trimaran is more stable than a monohull boat of the same size.
NEWS
May 3, 2001
Although samples of the sun's surface cannot be obtained because of its temperature, a NASA mission scheduled to start this summer will send a spacecraft outside Earth's magnetic field to collect material from its outer layers. Because the sun contains more than 99% of the material in the solar system, scientists hope a study of its solar wind will shed light on how the various elements of the solar system were formed. * Researched by CHRISTINE FREY / For The Times; Source: genesismission.jpl.
SCIENCE
March 11, 2012 | By Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times
The chest-high rack of electronics Justin Kasper is assembling in a Massachusetts office park will fit in a shoe box before he's done. It won't be much to look at - a few inches across, shaped rather like a coffee cup attached to a Kindle - but to Kasper, it'll serve as eyes across nearly 100 million miles of space. In less than seven years, that cup will be journeying to the center of the solar system to scoop up bits of the sun. "This really has been a life's dream," said Kasper, of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics in Cambridge, Mass.
BUSINESS
August 3, 2011 | By Tiffany Hsu, Los Angeles Times
They can look benign from a distance — solar panels glistening in the sun or turbines gently churning with the breeze to produce electricity for hundreds of thousands of homes. But building and maintaining them can be hazardous. Accidents involving wind turbines alone have tripled in the last decade, and watchdog groups fear incidents could skyrocket further — placing more workers and even bystanders in harm's way — because a surge in projects requires hiring hordes of new and often inexperienced workers.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|