Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSoldier S Death
IN THE NEWS

Soldier S Death

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 13, 2009 | By Matt Lait
Even in death, Lukas Hopper found a way to make people laugh. The charismatic 20-year-old paratrooper died Oct. 30 when an armored vehicle he was riding in rolled over on a road southeast of Baghdad. Along with the news about his death, Hopper's family received an Army questionnaire he had filled out before his deployment. What the Army intended as a somber list of last requests to be fulfilled in the event of a soldier's death became another opportunity for Hopper to crack wise.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 13, 2009 | By Matt Lait
Even in death, Lukas Hopper found a way to make people laugh. The charismatic 20-year-old paratrooper died Oct. 30 when an armored vehicle he was riding in rolled over on a road southeast of Baghdad. Along with the news about his death, Hopper's family received an Army questionnaire he had filled out before his deployment. What the Army intended as a somber list of last requests to be fulfilled in the event of a soldier's death became another opportunity for Hopper to crack wise.
Advertisement
OPINION
October 28, 2005 | On the Web For more letters see www.latimes.com/letters
Stories like "A Life Back in Flower When It Was Lost" (Oct. 26), regarding the death of a Muslim-convert GI, are extremely helpful. By separating the war in Iraq from "a war against Islam," stories like this begin to isolate the harmful and counterproductive rhetoric that surrounds this war from an understanding of the positive outcome that a dramatic change of leadership, planning and rhetoric could allow this war to have -- not only in Iraq but throughout...
ENTERTAINMENT
November 20, 2009 | By BETSY SHARKEY, Film Critic
For too long, life for Army Staff Sgt. Will Montgomery has been all about death. On the Iraqi frontline where he's been, he and his buddies just wanted to cheat it and survive. Now he's back home with only a few months left in his tour of duty, only to find himself surrounded by it once again. And so begins "The Messenger," starring Ben Foster as Will in a moving drama that takes a home-front look at the collateral damage of our current desert wars. The film puts us on the front porches of the families left behind and alongside Will as he delivers the worst possible news, that someone they love has died in combat.
OPINION
December 12, 2006
Re "Military deaths," Dec. 10 Another Sunday, another list. Like all the Sundays before, I read the names of the war casualties, along with the information of where they came from and how they died, and I say a prayer for each one. Until this Sunday, when I read about Pfc. Ross A. McGinnis, 19, from Knox, Pa., who threw himself onto a grenade, saving the lives of four other soldiers. I hope that Ross is a front-page hero back in Knox. His story belongs on a front page somewhere. I used to feel so sad when I finished reading the list.
OPINION
August 2, 2003
It is absurd that there would be any objection to the media showing the dead bodies of Saddam Hussein's sons, Uday and Qusai. Let these two dead men serve as a warning to any nation that might even consider any type of terrorism against the U.S. The photos of these two dead mass murderers and/or rapists hopefully will be implanted into the minds of any person or nation that has an idea of doing harm to the United States. Thank God we have a president who actually follows through on his remarks to stop terrorism against the U.S., instead of a president who drops a couple of bombs to distract the nation from the Monica Lewinsky testimony on TV. David Moseley Anaheim Every soldier in Iraq has a name, a life story and a family.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 20, 2009 | By BETSY SHARKEY, Film Critic
For too long, life for Army Staff Sgt. Will Montgomery has been all about death. On the Iraqi frontline where he's been, he and his buddies just wanted to cheat it and survive. Now he's back home with only a few months left in his tour of duty, only to find himself surrounded by it once again. And so begins "The Messenger," starring Ben Foster as Will in a moving drama that takes a home-front look at the collateral damage of our current desert wars. The film puts us on the front porches of the families left behind and alongside Will as he delivers the worst possible news, that someone they love has died in combat.
WORLD
February 26, 2014 | By Henry Chu
LONDON - Two Muslim extremists who butchered a young British soldier on a busy London street in full view of stunned passersby were sentenced Wednesday to long prison terms, including life without parole for the leader of the attack. A judge harshly denounced the men for planning and carrying out a frenzied public “bloodbath” for maximum effect, saying that Michael Adebolajo and Michael Adebowale's “sickening and pitiful conduct” warranted severe punishment. Adebolajo, 29, is to spend the rest of his life behind bars.
OPINION
December 12, 2006
Re "Military deaths," Dec. 10 Another Sunday, another list. Like all the Sundays before, I read the names of the war casualties, along with the information of where they came from and how they died, and I say a prayer for each one. Until this Sunday, when I read about Pfc. Ross A. McGinnis, 19, from Knox, Pa., who threw himself onto a grenade, saving the lives of four other soldiers. I hope that Ross is a front-page hero back in Knox. His story belongs on a front page somewhere. I used to feel so sad when I finished reading the list.
OPINION
October 28, 2005 | On the Web For more letters see www.latimes.com/letters
Stories like "A Life Back in Flower When It Was Lost" (Oct. 26), regarding the death of a Muslim-convert GI, are extremely helpful. By separating the war in Iraq from "a war against Islam," stories like this begin to isolate the harmful and counterproductive rhetoric that surrounds this war from an understanding of the positive outcome that a dramatic change of leadership, planning and rhetoric could allow this war to have -- not only in Iraq but throughout...
OPINION
August 2, 2003
It is absurd that there would be any objection to the media showing the dead bodies of Saddam Hussein's sons, Uday and Qusai. Let these two dead men serve as a warning to any nation that might even consider any type of terrorism against the U.S. The photos of these two dead mass murderers and/or rapists hopefully will be implanted into the minds of any person or nation that has an idea of doing harm to the United States. Thank God we have a president who actually follows through on his remarks to stop terrorism against the U.S., instead of a president who drops a couple of bombs to distract the nation from the Monica Lewinsky testimony on TV. David Moseley Anaheim Every soldier in Iraq has a name, a life story and a family.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|