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Soldiers And Sailors Civil Relief Act

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BUSINESS
March 23, 1991 | JESUS SANCHEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the brief telephone calls from Saudi Arabia, Christy Roemmich says, her husband never fails to bring up the subject. "He always asks me how the money is holding up," said the Elk Grove, Calif., woman of conversations with her husband, Michael, a 31-year-old staff sergeant with the California National Guard. Roemmich responds to the query with a standard "We are fine" and keeps to herself the many financial problems that have arisen since her husband was called to active duty in September.
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BUSINESS
March 23, 1991 | JESUS SANCHEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the brief telephone calls from Saudi Arabia, Christy Roemmich says, her husband never fails to bring up the subject. "He always asks me how the money is holding up," said the Elk Grove, Calif., woman of conversations with her husband, Michael, a 31-year-old staff sergeant with the California National Guard. Roemmich responds to the query with a standard "We are fine" and keeps to herself the many financial problems that have arisen since her husband was called to active duty in September.
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REAL ESTATE
April 6, 2003 | From staff and wire reports
The Department of Housing and Urban Development last week reminded all FHA-approved lenders that they must comply with the Soldiers' and Sailors' Civil Relief Act of 1940. That law mandates that military personnel on active duty in wartime be entitled to mortgage relief, including a lower interest rate (6%) on their mortgages. The letter to lenders stressed that all available options must be considered.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 3, 2003 | Catherine Saillant, Times Staff Writer
Military reservists who work for county government will continue to receive medical insurance coverage when called to active service, Ventura County supervisors decided this week. The decision came as the county's tax collector announced that active duty members of the military may apply for property tax considerations.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 3, 1991
I read with interest your article regarding the financial difficulties of military reservists ("Still Fighting the Battle of the Bills," March 23). I thought you might be interested in a number of measures moving through the California Legislature providing financial assistance to reservists by augmenting the federal Soldiers and Sailors Civil Relief Act of 1941, which is helpful but inadequate to many families in California. The Senate recently passed my Senate Bill 1, which would allow reservists to postpone mortgage, auto, retail credit and property tax payments for 180 days, while protecting the credit ratings of the reservist's family.
REAL ESTATE
April 14, 1991
This letter is to clarify portions of "WW II Legislation Helps Reduce GIs' Bills" by David W. Myers (Feb. 17), regarding the Soldiers' and Sailors' Civil Relief Act. First, the article states that the act protects full-time service members from certain debts incurred prior to "joining up." Not only are pre-enlistment debts protected, but also debts incurred prior to being called to active duty. Thus, a reservist can receive protection for debts incurred after enlistment but prior to the time orders to report to active duty become effective.
REAL ESTATE
October 12, 1997 | From Project Sentinel
QUESTION: I own two rental homes. I have often rented one of them to families with children. I do not rent the other one to such families because there are stairs leading to the basement that I feel are a hazard to small children. Recently, a prospective tenant accused me of discriminating against families with children. This shocked me, as I was simply attempting to prevent children from endangering themselves on what I deem to be an unsafe feature of the second home.
BUSINESS
January 20, 1991 | KATHY M. KRISTOF
There are tremendous anxieties involved in being in the military or being a spouse of a military member, especially now that the nation has gone to war. Some of those concerns are financial. Many reservists, for example, find their incomes cut substantially when called to active duty. And yet expenses often continue to mount. Although some large companies are supplementing reserve pay--at least for a time--other firms only guarantee that reservists will have comparable jobs when they return.
NEWS
February 14, 1991 | JEFFREY S. KLEIN and LOUIS M. BROWN
Soldiers on active duty in Operation Desert Storm have enough to worry about without thinking about their legal problems back home. But even for a soldier on the battlefield, civilian life goes on, dues and obligations pile up. Bills still have to be paid. Rent doesn't go away. Credit card and mortgage payments don't disappear. Perhaps there is even a lawsuit that wasn't completely resolved.
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