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Soledad Agua Dulce Union School District

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 5, 1993 | SHARON MOESER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
After months of squabbling, the school district in Acton and Agua Dulce has finally settled a dispute over the dedication of a high school site from a developer. After an often-heated, two-hour discussion, trustees agreed Thursday in a 3-2 decision to accept the 40-acre site as well as an adjacent 10-acre elementary site from a subsidiary of Watt Land Inc., a Santa Monica-based developer. Board members Nancy Kelso and Brian Sherwood dissented.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 5, 1993 | SHARON MOESER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
After months of squabbling, the school district in Acton and Agua Dulce has finally settled a dispute over the dedication of a high school site from a developer. After an often-heated, two-hour discussion, trustees agreed Thursday in a 3-2 decision to accept the 40-acre site as well as an adjacent 10-acre elementary site from a subsidiary of Watt Land Inc., a Santa Monica-based developer. Board members Nancy Kelso and Brian Sherwood dissented.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 6, 1993 | JOHN CHANDLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The county superintendent of schools on Monday urged elementary school officials from Acton and Agua Dulce to cancel plans to begin a local high school program this fall, an indication that the county may block local parents' desires to keep children near home. Los Angeles County Schools Supt. Stuart Gothold made the request in a four-page letter to the Soledad-Agua Dulce Union School District, warning that the expense of ninth-grade classes would bankrupt the small, rural district.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 17, 1993 | JOHN CHANDLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The school district in Acton and Agua Dulce has decided to proceed with plans to start a local high school program this fall, despite a warning from the county superintendent of schools that doing so could bankrupt the district, officials said Friday. The Soledad-Agua Dulce Union School District sent its response to Los Angeles County schools Supt.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 27, 1993 | JOHN CHANDLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Soledad-Agua Dulce Union School District has decided to start its own high school program this fall by creating ninth-grade classes instead of busing students to Palmdale, rejecting advice from county education officials that the little district doesn't have enough money for such an action.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 27, 1993 | JOHN CHANDLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Santa Clarita Valley school district came close Friday to firing former Los Angeles City Councilman Arthur K. Snyder's law firm because of a possible conflict of interest and an ethics investigation of Snyder being conducted in Los Angeles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 17, 1993 | JOHN CHANDLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The school district in Acton and Agua Dulce has decided to proceed with plans to start a local high school program this fall, despite a warning from the county superintendent of schools that doing so could bankrupt the district, officials said Friday. The Soledad-Agua Dulce Union School District sent its response to Los Angeles County schools Supt.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 21, 1992 | JOHN CHANDLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A growing number of Antelope Valley elementary school districts, smelling blood in the water as the region's high school district sinks in a sea of money problems, are looking into the possibility of taking over its role by setting up high schools of their own.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 13, 1993 | JOHN CHANDLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A land deal that two Santa Clarita Valley school board members tried to conclude without permission from the remainder of the board is invalid, but the two board members involved committed no crime, the school district's attorney has concluded. The attorney delivered the opinion Thursday night to the board of the Soledad-Agua Dulce Union School District in Acton.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 23, 1993 | JOHN CHANDLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If smaller school districts are the answer to solving education problems, as proponents of breaking up the giant Los Angeles district contend, that's news to the people who live in rural Acton and Agua Dulce. With only three schools and 1,660 students, the tiny Soledad-Agua Dulce Union School District is one of the smallest in Los Angeles County. So it must be a picture of peace and tranquillity unlike the behemoth Los Angeles district that is the nation's second largest, right? Not.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 6, 1993 | JOHN CHANDLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The county superintendent of schools on Monday urged elementary school officials from Acton and Agua Dulce to cancel plans to begin a local high school program this fall, an indication that the county may block local parents' desires to keep children near home. Los Angeles County Schools Supt. Stuart Gothold made the request in a four-page letter to the Soledad-Agua Dulce Union School District, warning that the expense of ninth-grade classes would bankrupt the small, rural district.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 27, 1993 | JOHN CHANDLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Soledad-Agua Dulce Union School District has decided to start its own high school program this fall by creating ninth-grade classes instead of busing students to Palmdale, rejecting advice from county education officials that the little district doesn't have enough money for such an action.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 27, 1993 | JOHN CHANDLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Santa Clarita Valley school district came close Friday to firing former Los Angeles City Councilman Arthur K. Snyder's law firm because of a possible conflict of interest and an ethics investigation of Snyder being conducted in Los Angeles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 23, 1993 | JOHN CHANDLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If smaller school districts are the answer to solving education problems, as proponents of breaking up the giant Los Angeles district contend, that's news to the people who live in rural Acton and Agua Dulce. With only three schools and 1,660 students, the tiny Soledad-Agua Dulce Union School District is one of the smallest in Los Angeles County. So it must be a picture of peace and tranquillity unlike the behemoth Los Angeles district that is the nation's second largest, right? Not.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 13, 1993 | JOHN CHANDLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A land deal that two Santa Clarita Valley school board members tried to conclude without permission from the remainder of the board is invalid, but the two board members involved committed no crime, the school district's attorney has concluded. The attorney delivered the opinion Thursday night to the board of the Soledad-Agua Dulce Union School District in Acton.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 9, 1993 | JOHN CHANDLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two members of the Soledad-Agua Dulce Union School Board are facing an internal investigation and demands that they resign over accusations that they acted illegally by carrying out a land deal without the board's approval.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 9, 1993 | JOHN CHANDLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two members of the Soledad-Agua Dulce Union School Board are facing an internal investigation and demands that they resign over accusations that they acted illegally by carrying out a land deal without the board's approval.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 30, 1992 | KIM KOWSKY
A statewide political group that opposes abortion has endorsed three of the 12 candidates for the proposed Redondo Beach Unified School District's Board of Trustees, even though school governing bodies make virtually no decisions relating to the issue. The three candidates, Stan Groman, Joyce LaBree and Lillian Parker, all acknowledged they have received the endorsement of the California Pro Life Council PAC.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 21, 1992 | JOHN CHANDLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A growing number of Antelope Valley elementary school districts, smelling blood in the water as the region's high school district sinks in a sea of money problems, are looking into the possibility of taking over its role by setting up high schools of their own.
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