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Soledad Enrichment Action Organization

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 11, 1997 | MATEA GOLD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Gov. Pete Wilson signed a bill late Wednesday that will revive a group of widely praised alternative schools based in East Los Angeles, allowing them to operate as a charter program. Wilson praised the Soledad Enrichment Action program as a successful example of how to help high-risk students. His approval of the bill will allow the program to reopen at least eight sites by Aug. 1, program administrators said. "It feels really good," said Brother Modesto Leon, executive director of the program.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 15, 1998 | LINDSEY M. ARENT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
From wounded to healer. Gerardo Garibay, 35, grew up in a home with domestic violence and saw his five younger siblings run with gangs. His father eventually abandoned the family, and one brother died in a gang shooting. That painful background, Garibay said, makes him more effective today in leading his "parents teaching parents" gang-prevention classes. A lot of his students have the same type of experiences, said Garibay, a goateed father of five who wears two gold hoops in his ear.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 23, 1996 | MONICA VALENCIA and AMY PYLE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A widely praised program that has educated troubled Los Angeles youths for more than two decades has been temporarily shut down and is at risk of permanent closure after findings that it violated state regulations. Closed three weeks ago were the 16 schools of Soledad Enrichment Action run by Brother Modesto Leon, which served about 850 high-risk students--many dropouts and gang members on criminal probation--in church social halls and community centers scattered from Pomona to Pacoima.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 11, 1997 | MATEA GOLD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Gov. Pete Wilson signed a bill late Wednesday that will revive a group of widely praised alternative schools based in East Los Angeles, allowing them to operate as a charter program. Wilson praised the Soledad Enrichment Action program as a successful example of how to help high-risk students. His approval of the bill will allow the program to reopen at least eight sites by Aug. 1, program administrators said. "It feels really good," said Brother Modesto Leon, executive director of the program.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 27, 1997 | MATEA GOLD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A bill that would allow a group of acclaimed alternative schools based in East Los Angeles to reopen as a charter program sailed through the state Legislature on Thursday. "We're dancing in the streets," said Brother Modesto Leon, executive director of the Soledad Enrichment Action centers. The 25-year-old program has received high praise for reaching at-risk youths, many of whom are on court-ordered probation or have been kicked out of public school.
NEWS
September 3, 1996 | JANE GROSS, TIMES URBAN AFFAIRS WRITER
"Empowerment" has become a tired buzzword, the mantra of inner-city do-gooders. But the term comes alive when uttered by Brother Modesto Leon, a Clarentian missionary who turns rhetoric to reality in the most hellish corners of Los Angeles County, where teenagers gun each other down as a matter of course and are mourned by parents too bewildered to know what hit them.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 15, 1998 | LINDSEY M. ARENT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
From wounded to healer. Gerardo Garibay, 35, grew up in a home with domestic violence and saw his five younger siblings run with gangs. His father eventually abandoned the family, and one brother died in a gang shooting. That painful background, Garibay said, makes him more effective today in leading his "parents teaching parents" gang-prevention classes. A lot of his students have the same type of experiences, said Garibay, a goateed father of five who wears two gold hoops in his ear.
NEWS
May 10, 1992 | MIKE WARD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Father Bill Easterling has a simple way to measure the effectiveness of the anti-gang program of the Soledad Enrichment Action (SEA) organization. "I measure it by the number of hospital calls and funerals I'm not doing," said the Roman Catholic priest from St. Joseph Church here. "I'm doing a lot less, which I am grateful for." The priest from St. Joseph Church said SEA's programs are one reason fewer children are dying in drive-by shootings.
NEWS
March 28, 1991 | MIKE WARD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Whenever she hears that someone has joined a gang, Sister Leticia Gomez said she always tells the youth: "You're messing up. You're giving your mother and me only three options: visiting you in jail, seeing you in the hospital or taking you to the cemetery." Sister Leticia was at the cemetery Tuesday, burying the latest in a lengthening list of victims of gang violence.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 27, 1997 | MATEA GOLD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A bill that would allow a group of acclaimed alternative schools based in East Los Angeles to reopen as a charter program sailed through the state Legislature on Thursday. "We're dancing in the streets," said Brother Modesto Leon, executive director of the Soledad Enrichment Action centers. The 25-year-old program has received high praise for reaching at-risk youths, many of whom are on court-ordered probation or have been kicked out of public school.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 23, 1996 | MONICA VALENCIA and AMY PYLE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A widely praised program that has educated troubled Los Angeles youths for more than two decades has been temporarily shut down and is at risk of permanent closure after findings that it violated state regulations. Closed three weeks ago were the 16 schools of Soledad Enrichment Action run by Brother Modesto Leon, which served about 850 high-risk students--many dropouts and gang members on criminal probation--in church social halls and community centers scattered from Pomona to Pacoima.
NEWS
September 3, 1996 | JANE GROSS, TIMES URBAN AFFAIRS WRITER
"Empowerment" has become a tired buzzword, the mantra of inner-city do-gooders. But the term comes alive when uttered by Brother Modesto Leon, a Clarentian missionary who turns rhetoric to reality in the most hellish corners of Los Angeles County, where teenagers gun each other down as a matter of course and are mourned by parents too bewildered to know what hit them.
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