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BUSINESS
January 28, 2005 | Jube Shiver Jr., Times Staff Writer
The Bush administration said Thursday that it would not seek Supreme Court review of a lower-court ruling that has made it harder for the nation's media giants to get even bigger. The call by the U.S. solicitor general's office is a blow for companies including News Corp., Viacom Inc., General Electric Co.'s NBC and Tribune Co., owner of the Los Angeles Times. Those firms, along with the National Assn.
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BUSINESS
January 28, 2005 | Jube Shiver Jr., Times Staff Writer
The Bush administration said Thursday that it would not seek Supreme Court review of a lower-court ruling that has made it harder for the nation's media giants to get even bigger. The call by the U.S. solicitor general's office is a blow for companies including News Corp., Viacom Inc., General Electric Co.'s NBC and Tribune Co., owner of the Los Angeles Times. Those firms, along with the National Assn.
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NEWS
July 17, 1997 | Associated Press
Acting Solicitor General Walter Dellinger announced Wednesday that he will return to teaching in September. Dellinger, 56, said he would conclude his work as overseer of the government's court appeals by appearing Aug. 11 before the U.S. 4th Circuit Court of Appeals to defend the Food and Drug Administration's proposed regulation of nicotine and tobacco products. No successor has been named.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 2004 | Peter Y. Hong, Times Staff Writer
Kenneth W. Starr, the former independent counsel who investigated President Clinton and First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton, will become the next dean of the law school at Pepperdine University. The appointment marks the second time Starr has been chosen to head the Malibu law school. He accepted the post in 1997 but withdrew before he could start work because his investigation of the Clintons had expanded. In a statement, Pepperdine President Andrew K.
SPORTS
December 11, 1990
The Justice Department, supporting pro football players in a legal fight for free agency, recommended that the Supreme Court hear the appeal of players who are suing the NFL. The NFL Players Assn. called the advice from the government's top lawyer a victory in the courtroom battle it has waged with the league since the players' unsuccessful strike in 1987.
NEWS
February 2, 1989 | DAVID LAUTER, Times Staff Writer
President Bush on Wednesday named federal appeals court Judge Kenneth W. Starr to be solicitor general, a position that in the past often has been a steppingstone to the Supreme Court. The solicitor general is the government's chief advocate before the high court and a key player in formulating federal policy on legal questions. Several of the Supreme Court's most prominent members during this century have served in the post--most recently Thurgood Marshall.
NEWS
April 6, 2001 | ERIC LICHTBLAU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The lawyer tapped by President Bush for a prestigious Justice Department post came under fire Thursday for his sharp conservative rhetoric, but he vowed that his politics would not color his reading of the law on abortion, affirmative action and other sensitive issues. Democrats on the Senate Judiciary Committee, however, were openly skeptical as they considered the nomination of Theodore B. Olson, a superstar Republican lawyer from Los Angeles whom Bush nominated in February to be U.S.
NEWS
July 22, 1989 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, Times Staff Writer
The quiet days of July have settled on the solicitor general's office, time to count wins and losses during the Supreme Court term just ended. This year's score card has the entire office smiling, even prompting some uncharacteristic boasting. Just two years ago, the Ronald Reagan Administration's solicitor general, Charles Fried, was being publicly lambasted. Liberals and some court scholars accused him of having injected politics into a respected, nonpartisan legal post.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 2004 | Peter Y. Hong, Times Staff Writer
Kenneth W. Starr, the former independent counsel who investigated President Clinton and First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton, will become the next dean of the law school at Pepperdine University. The appointment marks the second time Starr has been chosen to head the Malibu law school. He accepted the post in 1997 but withdrew before he could start work because his investigation of the Clintons had expanded. In a statement, Pepperdine President Andrew K.
NEWS
December 30, 1997 | From Associated Press
Jailed former President Kenneth D. Kaunda appeared before Zambia's High Court on Monday, but the hearing was adjourned after his lawyers sought more time to review government documents against him. Outside, supporters sang and waved banners behind a police cordon, demanding the release of Kaunda, who leads the nation's largest opposition coalition. Kaunda, 73, was arrested Christmas Day on suspicion of involvement in a failed Oct. 28 coup attempt.
NEWS
April 6, 2001 | ERIC LICHTBLAU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The lawyer tapped by President Bush for a prestigious Justice Department post came under fire Thursday for his sharp conservative rhetoric, but he vowed that his politics would not color his reading of the law on abortion, affirmative action and other sensitive issues. Democrats on the Senate Judiciary Committee, however, were openly skeptical as they considered the nomination of Theodore B. Olson, a superstar Republican lawyer from Los Angeles whom Bush nominated in February to be U.S.
NEWS
July 17, 1997 | Associated Press
Acting Solicitor General Walter Dellinger announced Wednesday that he will return to teaching in September. Dellinger, 56, said he would conclude his work as overseer of the government's court appeals by appearing Aug. 11 before the U.S. 4th Circuit Court of Appeals to defend the Food and Drug Administration's proposed regulation of nicotine and tobacco products. No successor has been named.
SPORTS
December 11, 1990
The Justice Department, supporting pro football players in a legal fight for free agency, recommended that the Supreme Court hear the appeal of players who are suing the NFL. The NFL Players Assn. called the advice from the government's top lawyer a victory in the courtroom battle it has waged with the league since the players' unsuccessful strike in 1987.
NEWS
July 22, 1989 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, Times Staff Writer
The quiet days of July have settled on the solicitor general's office, time to count wins and losses during the Supreme Court term just ended. This year's score card has the entire office smiling, even prompting some uncharacteristic boasting. Just two years ago, the Ronald Reagan Administration's solicitor general, Charles Fried, was being publicly lambasted. Liberals and some court scholars accused him of having injected politics into a respected, nonpartisan legal post.
NEWS
February 2, 1989 | DAVID LAUTER, Times Staff Writer
President Bush on Wednesday named federal appeals court Judge Kenneth W. Starr to be solicitor general, a position that in the past often has been a steppingstone to the Supreme Court. The solicitor general is the government's chief advocate before the high court and a key player in formulating federal policy on legal questions. Several of the Supreme Court's most prominent members during this century have served in the post--most recently Thurgood Marshall.
NATIONAL
May 24, 2011 | By David G. Savage, Washington Bureau
Acting Solicitor Gen. Neal Katyal, in an extraordinary admission of misconduct, took to task one of his predecessors for hiding evidence and deceiving the Supreme Court in two of the major cases in its history: the World War II rulings that upheld the detention of more than 110,000 Japanese Americans. Katyal said Tuesday that Charles Fahy, an appointee of President Franklin D. Roosevelt, deliberately hid from the court a report from the Office of Naval Intelligence that concluded the Japanese Americans on the West Coast did not pose a military threat.
NEWS
April 2, 1998 | DAVID WILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For President Clinton's defenders, it's one sexual harassment lawsuit down but one related criminal investigation left to go. A federal judge's dismissal Wednesday of the Paula Corbin Jones harassment case strengthens the White House public relations effort. But the fallout from the decision will not derail independent counsel Kenneth W. Starr's investigation of Clinton's dealings with two former White House aides, legal experts said.
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