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NEWS
February 1, 1986 | LEE DYE and RALPH VARTABEDIAN, Times Staff Writers
Aerospace experts differed sharply Friday on whether the powerful solid rocket motors that lifted the space shuttle Challenger off the launching pad Tuesday were the likely cause of its disastrous explosion just 73 seconds later. The boosters continue to be a prime suspect in the tragedy because films of the disaster seem to show flame coming out of the side of one of the boosters.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 19, 2011 | By Rong-Gong Lin II, Los Angeles Times
The California Science Center has won a new companion exhibit to the space shuttle Endeavour: the shuttle's external tank and twin solid rocket boosters. The tank –- the orange cylindrical structure affixed to the shuttle's belly at launch –- and twin solid rocket boosters had been displayed at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida. When the shuttle exhibit is assembled next year, it will be a challenge to ship the external tank from Florida. It is typically moved by barge, meaning it might have to be taken through the Panama Canal, said Science Center President Jeffrey N. Rudolph.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 27, 1990 | From Times staff and wire service reports
Exhaust from space shuttle and other rocket launches makes the government one of the biggest contributors to ozone depletion, an environmental group charged last week. "Each launch of the space shuttle or the Air Force's Titan IV does more to deplete the fragile ozone layer . . . than the annual ground-level emissions of chlorofluorocarbons from most individual (industrial) plants," the report by the National Toxics Campaign Fund of Boston said.
WORLD
November 13, 2008 | Borzou Daragahi, Daragahi is a Times staff writer.
U.S. officials Wednesday condemned Iran for test-firing a long-range surface-to-surface missile, which they called a violation of United Nations Security Council resolutions and a threat to other countries. Iranian Defense Minister Mostafa Mohammed Najjar earlier in the day announced the successful launch of a new class of two-stage, solid-fuel rocket called the Sejil.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 2, 1995
NASA has reported that evidence of leakage and extensive damage to O-ring seals have been discovered in the nozzle joint of the space shuttle solid rocket boosters after the last two flights. The same joint leakage problems and design flaws that initiated the Challenger disaster, nine years ago, are still present and have not been satisfactorily corrected. As a result of these abnormalities, NASA is seriously considering grounding the shuttle indefinitely. After the Challenger accident, Congress initiated the Advanced Solid Rocket Motor (ASRM)
NEWS
July 2, 1986 | Associated Press
The explosive loss of an unmanned Titan 34D rocket during a military mission last April was most likely caused by the peeling of insulation inside a solid-fuel booster, the Air Force said today. The loss of the rubberized insulation allowed the burning fuel to eat through the thin metal skin of the rocket booster, touching off a catastrophic explosion, said Brig. Gen. Nathan J. Lindsay.
NEWS
February 13, 1987 | Associated Press
John Young, head of the astronaut office at NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston, has questioned the redesign of the solid rocket booster that caused the Challenger accident in light of new information on wind turbulence, a newspaper reported. In a memo, Young voiced concern about the shuttle's ability to withstand dynamic forces it encounters at launching, the Washington Post said in today's editions, quoting unidentified sources.
SCIENCE
October 18, 2003 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A spacecraft that broke up last year during a mission to study comets was probably destroyed by the heat from its rocket motor, NASA officials said. The theory is the most probable of four scenarios outlined by the board that investigated the loss of the $159-million Contour. The board found the hot plume of exhaust gases produced by the firing of the solid rocket motor probably caused "structural failure."
NEWS
October 28, 1986 | Associated Press
Early tests show that a new rocket engine design will eliminate the flaws that caused the space shuttle Challenger to blow up, a National Aeronautics and Space Administration official said Monday. John Thomas, manager of NASA's solid rocket motor redesign team, also said the space agency is on track toward a resumption of space flights in early 1988.
NEWS
June 14, 1988 | Associated Press
Production of a critical ingredient for solid rocket fuel resumed Monday at a Kerr-McGee Corp. plant, five weeks after explosions destroyed the only other plant making the chemical a mile away. Workers resumed production Monday morning of the chemical, ammonium perchlorate, which provides the oxygen necessary to burn solid fuel in the booster rockets on the space shuttle and in some military rockets.
SCIENCE
October 18, 2003 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A spacecraft that broke up last year during a mission to study comets was probably destroyed by the heat from its rocket motor, NASA officials said. The theory is the most probable of four scenarios outlined by the board that investigated the loss of the $159-million Contour. The board found the hot plume of exhaust gases produced by the firing of the solid rocket motor probably caused "structural failure."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 2, 1995
NASA has reported that evidence of leakage and extensive damage to O-ring seals have been discovered in the nozzle joint of the space shuttle solid rocket boosters after the last two flights. The same joint leakage problems and design flaws that initiated the Challenger disaster, nine years ago, are still present and have not been satisfactorily corrected. As a result of these abnormalities, NASA is seriously considering grounding the shuttle indefinitely. After the Challenger accident, Congress initiated the Advanced Solid Rocket Motor (ASRM)
NEWS
November 25, 1991 | LEE DYE, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
The Tombigbee Waterway curves through these hills like a giant question mark, as though the land itself is puzzled over the mystery of it all. High on a bluff, where the Tennessee Valley Authority a few years ago dumped $1.5 billion into a nuclear power plant before abandoning the project, the big rigs are at work again.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 27, 1990 | From Times staff and wire service reports
Exhaust from space shuttle and other rocket launches makes the government one of the biggest contributors to ozone depletion, an environmental group charged last week. "Each launch of the space shuttle or the Air Force's Titan IV does more to deplete the fragile ozone layer . . . than the annual ground-level emissions of chlorofluorocarbons from most individual (industrial) plants," the report by the National Toxics Campaign Fund of Boston said.
NEWS
April 21, 1989 | From United Press International
Lockheed Missile Systems Division won contracts worth more than $1 billion to build new space shuttle solid rocket boosters at an abandoned nuclear power plant in Mississippi, NASA announced today. The total cost for the controversial seven-year project, which calls for design, development and testing of the new advanced solid rocket motor, or ASRM, along with construction of new manufacturing facilities, was estimated by Lockheed of Sunnyvale, Calif., to be more than $1.1 billion.
NEWS
June 14, 1988 | Associated Press
Production of a critical ingredient for solid rocket fuel resumed Monday at a Kerr-McGee Corp. plant, five weeks after explosions destroyed the only other plant making the chemical a mile away. Workers resumed production Monday morning of the chemical, ammonium perchlorate, which provides the oxygen necessary to burn solid fuel in the booster rockets on the space shuttle and in some military rockets.
NEWS
February 15, 1988
The test firing near San Jose of a rocket booster motor designed for use in the Titan IV space launch alarmed more than a thousand area residents with its sensational rumble and smoke. Officials at the San Jose Police Department and Santa Clara County Sheriff's Department said they received almost 1,300 calls after the two-minute demonstration firing in the mountains south of San Jose.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 22, 1987 | United Press International
Disappointed rocket engineers said Friday the failure of a hydraulic system during a shuttle booster test-firing prevented them from gathering key data about how new O-ring joints respond to external forces. The 52-foot subscale booster was fired Thursday at Marshall Space Flight Center in the first of a series of tests to subject the sensitive joints to both internal and external forces similar to those experienced by real boosters at liftoff. "We've looked at some more data since (the test) .
NEWS
June 8, 1988 | Associated Press
A government contractor that makes and tests rockets just east of Reno was told on Tuesday to be more open about just what it makes and the safety of its operations, particularly with Storey County commissioners. "I don't think the board realized what was going to happen out there," Commissioner Mark Schrader told officials of Hi-Shear Technology Corp. in ordering them to allow closer state and county scrutiny of their facility.
NEWS
May 6, 1988 | ANNE C. ROARK, Times Staff Writer
Solid rocket fuel is among the most explosive and dangerous substances in the defense and space industries, but it was chosen for use in the boosters of the Space Shuttle because among other things it is cheaper and easier to store than liquid fuel, according to experts in the space industry.
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