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Solitude

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ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 2014 | By Christie D'Zurilla
Patrick Stewart is great to follow on Twitter, even more so lately as he posts daily pics of himself and pal Ian McKellen while they count down the remaining days of their "Two Shows in Rep" run on Broadway. Stewart and McKellen playing Skee-Ball , Stewart and McKellen on a skyscraper with New York City unfolding behind them, Stewart and McKellen on the boardwalk -- all with black bowlers firmly in place. (The buddies are appearing together in a double-shot of "Waiting for Godot" and "No Man's Land" at the Cort Theatre.)
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 18, 2014 | Chris Kraul and Thomas Curwen
When Colonel Aureliano Buendia faced the firing squad, time slipped away, and his life became a dream. Before him rose the mythical town of Macondo and its retinue of gypsies and their pipes and kettle drums and magical inventions. Of course Buendia's dream belonged to the teller of the tale, Gabriel Garcia Marquez, whose novel "One Hundred Years of Solitude" casts a spell upon readers that can never be broken. A Spanish galleon lies in the jungle, its hull "an armor of petrified barnacles and soft moss," its sails dirty rags, the rigging adorned with orchids.
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TRAVEL
July 1, 2012
Contra Costa County pier Point Pinole Pier Overview: The allure is the walk through the grassy parklands of the Point Pinole Regional Shoreline to get to the 1,250-foot concrete pier. The views are not impressive — San Francisco isn't visible from this vantage point — but the solitude makes it special. Background: Beginning in the 1880s, several companies used the spot for manufacturing gunpowder and dynamite. The original pier (its pilings can be seen at the foot of the current pier, which was built in 1977)
ENTERTAINMENT
April 17, 2014 | By Carolyn Kellogg
It may be generations before we see another writer reach Gabriel Garcia Marquez's stature; he was so well-known and well-loved. His novel "One Hundred Years of Solitude" became an international bestseller of previously unknown proportions. After he was awarded the Nobel Prize in literature in 1982, he rubbed shoulders with world leaders, kept writing, and, in countries all over the globe, celebrated books. Now, with Garcia Marquez gone, his fans -- presidents, writers, and more -- have been sharing their appreciation for the man and his work.
TRAVEL
September 8, 2013 | By Avital Andrews
VACAVILLE, Calif. - A few months ago, I found out that my life was about to get louder. Seeing the word "pregnant" appear on a stick can quickly change how you look at - and hear - things. With quiet and solitude about to become rare commodities, it seemed like a good time to head to Silent Stay, a monastic retreat atop a Vacaville hill about 30 miles east of Napa. The idea, basically, is to shut up while you center yourself. The concept intrigued me, so I booked the three-night minimum stay.
SPORTS
May 7, 1988
Opening weekend of the Eastern Sierra trout season has come and gone and once again the majority of the news focused on "body counts" from the various popular fishing spots. Why is it that Southern California sportsmen hold this annual pilgrimage to Sierra lakes and, for a brief weekend, create a mini-L.A. basin complete with crowds, noise and litter? I haven't figured out that one yet, but I would like to thank Rich Roberts for devoting a bit of his article (May 2) to a few people who, like myself, would just as soon enjoy a little solitude with our fishing.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 25, 2009 | F. Kathleen Foley
Swelling with art, heart and high style, "Solitude," a Latino Theater Company production at the Los Angeles Theatre Center, examines the human imperatives of love in all its painful permutations. Evelina Fernandez's world-premiere play was largely inspired by Octavio Paz's "The Labyrinth of Solitude," a landmark work positing that the conflict between Mexico's indigenous and Spanish cultures had split the collective Mexican psyche in two, with an outward "mask" of conviviality concealing inner despair.
TRAVEL
July 22, 2001 | SUSAN SPANO, TIMES TRAVEL WRITER
I learned much of what I know from traveling, useful things such as how to pack or get around in strange places. Travel also has taught me about who I am and what I value. Just about all the rest I learned from reading, which has inspired and directed my travels. It's especially gratifying when I find books that validate some of the deeper lessons I've learned on the road.
NEWS
June 3, 2001 | JEFF BARNARD, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Seventy-seven days into his search for deep solitude in the misty forest of the Rogue River canyon, John Daniel was hard up against it. There was no more comfort to be found in chopping wood, tending the garden, taking long tramps through the woods hunting grouse, fishing for steelhead or even giving himself a buzz cut with the electric clippers. Cranky and restless, he rummaged through newspapers in the kindling box next to the wood stove for a crossword puzzle.
NEWS
January 22, 1992 | JANNY SCOTT, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
At a time when more Americans than ever are living alone, evidence is mounting that isolation can be bad for one's health for reasons that may range from the absence of a ride to a hospital to the lack of some chemical response to human contact. The latest clues about the health hazards of aloneness are in two studies published today that found people who suffer a heart attack are more likely to die or suffer another attack within six months if they live alone and have no close friends.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 2014 | By Christie D'Zurilla
Patrick Stewart is great to follow on Twitter, even more so lately as he posts daily pics of himself and pal Ian McKellen while they count down the remaining days of their "Two Shows in Rep" run on Broadway. Stewart and McKellen playing Skee-Ball , Stewart and McKellen on a skyscraper with New York City unfolding behind them, Stewart and McKellen on the boardwalk -- all with black bowlers firmly in place. (The buddies are appearing together in a double-shot of "Waiting for Godot" and "No Man's Land" at the Cort Theatre.)
TRAVEL
March 7, 2014 | By Brian E. Clark
DEER VALLEY, Utah - Carving turns through light, puffy powder at just one of the resorts in Utah's Wasatch Range is plenty to write home about for most skiers. But to ski six of the state's premier areas in one day - linked by way of the backcountry - is a true coup, especially when the sky is a cloudless deep blue and untouched snow lines the bowls. You don't have to be an experienced mountaineer to pull this off. Schussers can navigate the route on a guided tour on the Interconnect, which starts at Deer Valley and weaves through Park City Mountain Resort, Solitude, Brighton and Alta - with dips out of bounds - before finishing at Snowbird.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 28, 2014 | By David Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
Yiyun Li begins her second novel, "Kinder Than Solitude," in a place of endings: a crematorium. The time is the present, more or less, and a Beijing resident named Boyang waits for the ashes of his childhood friend Shaoai, dead at 43 after having been poisoned (accidentally or otherwise) 21 years before. "Who wanted her to die?" Boyang's mother asks when he visits after dropping off the woman's cremains with her family. "Who wanted to kill her back then?" These questions resonate throughout this novel, which moves fluidly between past and present, among Beijing, Massachusetts and the Bay Area, in tracing the intersecting lives of four people - Boyang, Shaoai and two other women, Ruyu and Moran - as they wrestle with both their complicity and their heritage.
TRAVEL
September 8, 2013 | By Avital Andrews
VACAVILLE, Calif. - A few months ago, I found out that my life was about to get louder. Seeing the word "pregnant" appear on a stick can quickly change how you look at - and hear - things. With quiet and solitude about to become rare commodities, it seemed like a good time to head to Silent Stay, a monastic retreat atop a Vacaville hill about 30 miles east of Napa. The idea, basically, is to shut up while you center yourself. The concept intrigued me, so I booked the three-night minimum stay.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 23, 2013 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
Paul Yoon's "Snow Hunters" is a novel in which little happens - not, in many ways, unlike life. This is not meant as criticism: Some of the fiction that moves me most is that with the least overt action, in which the interior rather than the exterior is at stake. That's the case here too, as Yoon explores the experiences of a man named Yohan, a North Korean who defects in the 1950s, after the Korean War. Moving back and forth between Yohan's adjustment to living in a Brazilian coastal town and his memories of childhood as well as of a period spent as a prisoner in an American hospital camp, it is a lovely novel, subtly rendered, operating "as though someone, somewhere, were dreaming this and he had crossed into it without permission.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 11, 2012 | By Allan M. Jalon
SANTA BARBARA - Chinese scrolls often show landscapes of mountains, deep-cut gorges and paths that spiral through them and past caves in foliage. On these paths, often barely visible, smallish robed figures walk alone or sit in a group. Even people relatively familiar with this kind of art have peered at the finely drawn figures and wondered: Who are they? What are they up to? The Santa Barbara Museum of Art is offering an unusually comprehensive answer to such questions with a far-reaching show called "The Artful Recluse: Painting, Poetry, and Politics in 17th Century China.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 26, 2012 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
Winter Journal Paul Auster Henry Holt: 230 pp., $26 The most evocative passage in Paul Auster's "Winter Journal" comes early in the book. "Yes, you drink too much and you smoke too much, you have lost teeth without bothering to replace them, your diet does not conform to the precepts of contemporary nutritional wisdom," Auster admits, referring to himself in the second person, as he does throughout this fragmentary memoir, "but if you shun most vegetables it is simply because you do not like them, and you find it difficult, if not impossible, to eat what you do not like.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 20, 2011 | By George Ducker, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The Empty Family Stories Colm Tóibín Scribner: 277 pp., $24 Walking into solitude is not so difficult ? even nowadays, with the digital contrails of voicemail and instant messaging. "I live alone now and I work hard," writes a character in Colm Tóibín's newest short-story collection, "The Empty Family. " "And when I am not working I am away. I do not see anyone I have no desire to see. It is easy to screen calls and avoid answering emails, and then they peter out. " This last matter, this slow deletion of personal relationships, is at the core of the nine stories in this collection, as Tóibín projects a slideshow of reclusive figures, many of whom have found that a life well-hid is a life sufficient.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 26, 2012 | By Diana Marcum, Los Angeles Times
MONO PASS TRAIL - Mary Breckenridge crosses the High Sierra every year, with only her horse and two mules for company. She always leaves in September, when heat still tents the Central Valley but cool mountain breezes stir silvery-green aspen leaves. Higher up, the nights could be so cold that the water in her coffee pot turned rock-hard. It's happened. She kept going. Packing and unpacking 300 pounds of gear daily, making and breaking camp, starting her fire from twigs. Reporter's notebook: Follow the journey It made her feel thrillingly self-reliant.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 26, 2012 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
Winter Journal Paul Auster Henry Holt: 230 pp., $26 The most evocative passage in Paul Auster's "Winter Journal" comes early in the book. "Yes, you drink too much and you smoke too much, you have lost teeth without bothering to replace them, your diet does not conform to the precepts of contemporary nutritional wisdom," Auster admits, referring to himself in the second person, as he does throughout this fragmentary memoir, "but if you shun most vegetables it is simply because you do not like them, and you find it difficult, if not impossible, to eat what you do not like.
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