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September 27, 2012 | By Randy Lewis
It's hardly unusual for a veteran musician to record a batch of songs largely associated with other artists, as Monkees singer-drummer Micky Dolenz has done on his new solo album, “Remember.” It includes his takes on such familiar rock and pop oldies as the Beatles' “Good Morning, Good Morning,” Chuck Berry's “Johnnny B. Goode,” the Archies' “Sugar, Sugar” and Harry Nilsson's title tune, along with new arrangements of a handful of...
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 26, 2014 | By Mikael Wood
The lead cut on the new Pixies album is called "What Goes Boom?," and one answer to that question is the Pixies' other albums. Formed in Boston in 1986, this smart but savage guitar band did as much as any to invent what became known as alternative rock. Its early records, such as "Surfer Rosa" and "Doolittle," were like a big bang that led to the creation of Smashing Pumpkins and Nirvana, whose Kurt Cobain once described his "Smells Like Teen Spirit" as a rip-off of the Pixies' soft-then-loud sound.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 13, 2012 | By Mikael Wood
Jim James has done plenty of work lately outside the confines of his Kentucky-based roots-rock band, My Morning Jacket: In 2009 he recorded and toured with Conor Oberst, M. Ward and Mike Mogis as Monsters of Folk , and earlier this year he took part in an all-semi-star homage to Woody Guthrie called " New Multitudes . " There's also "Tribute To," the 2009 EP of George Harrison covers he put out under the name Yim Yames. So far, though, James hasn't released a full-on solo album of original songs, something set to change on Feb. 5, when he'll issue the rather grandly titled "Regions of Light and Sound of God" through ATO Records.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 24, 2014 | By Chris Barton
"Good things come to those who wait," Neneh Cherry sings over stormy electronics and a skittering rhythm on her first solo album in 16 years. If there's a lingering take-away from "Blank Project," that's it. Cherry, whose breakout hit "Buffalo Stance" was practically inescapable in the late '80s, left music for years before reemerging with "The Cherry Thing" in 2012. A brash stab of skronky jazz-punk that paired Cherry's soulful vocals with a blustery Scandinavian saxophone trio, the record was one of the year's best.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 24, 2014 | By Chris Barton
"Good things come to those who wait," Neneh Cherry sings over stormy electronics and a skittering rhythm on her first solo album in 16 years. If there's a lingering take-away from "Blank Project," that's it. Cherry, whose breakout hit "Buffalo Stance" was practically inescapable in the late '80s, left music for years before reemerging with "The Cherry Thing" in 2012. A brash stab of skronky jazz-punk that paired Cherry's soulful vocals with a blustery Scandinavian saxophone trio, the record was one of the year's best.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 29, 1993 | LYNNE HEFFLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Move over, Sinatra: Ol' Brown Ears is Back. Rowlf the Dog, that gravelly voiced, shaggy-haired saloon singer extraordinaire, is celebrating 210 dog years in show biz, with a new solo album of memorable hits. Rowlf pairs his distinctive vocal stylings with his unique piano artistry in a collection of memorable tunes that range from the poignant "I Never Harmed an Onion" ("So why should they make me cry?"
ENTERTAINMENT
January 28, 2000
An unreleased album by local musician Josh Clayton-Felt, the former leader of the group School of Fish, who died of cancer Jan. 19, will be played at a listening session Saturday from 5 to 7 p.m. at Raleigh Studios' Chaplin Theatre, 5300 Melrose Ave. Admission is a $20 donation, with proceeds going to Clayton-Felt's favorite charities. The album, his second solo set, was completed in December before his cancer was diagnosed.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 5, 1995 | Mike Boehm
So how has "X-Ray" gone over with Ray Davies' fellow Kinks (including brother Dave Davies, the lead guitarist with whom Ray has carried on one of the most famously contentious sibling relationships in pop history--the roots of which, by the "X-Ray" account, go back to Dave's infancy and Ray's toddlerhood)? "They don't actually say 'We like it' or 'We think it sucks,' " Ray answered. "They probably do think things I do suck sometimes, but they let their feelings out through their work.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 29, 1988 | DON SNOWDEN
Stanley Clarke got an offer last year that he couldn't refuse . . . once he picked himself off the floor. The bassist/producer, who appears Saturday at the two-day Long Beach Jazz Festival this weekend, was approaching the end of his deal with CBS Records and contemplating a label shift. But it wasn't a big money offer that surprised Clarke; it was the suggestion by label execs that he make the kind of record he wanted to without taking commercial considerations into account.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 16, 1992 | J. MARTIN McOMBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Paul Weller, who ranks as one of the most popular and acclaimed figures to graduate from the British punk-rock movement, found himself without a record contract and on the verge of quitting the music business just a year ago.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 2014 | By Todd Martens
Pharrell Williams says it cost him about $200, and for much of the last month it has become the center of attention. It's been compared to the Arby's logo. It has room for secret compartments, perhaps even a leprechaun. It took on a social media life of its own. It somehow appears capable of staying on Williams' head when he performs.  We're talking, of course, about Williams' hat. The tan monster of a headgear accessory can now be yours, but you're going to need more than a little disposable income.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 9, 2013 | By Randy Lewis
Brian Wilson's impending tour with English guitar hero Jeff Beck already includes two other founding members of the Beach Boys -- Al Jardine and David Marks -- and now for at least five of the dates Wilson will be joined by another former Beach Boy, guitarist-singer Blondie Chaplin. Chaplin, who joined the quintessential Southern California fun-in-the-sun band briefly in the early-1970s, will be part of Wilson's performances in Hollywood, Fla., New York City, Las Vegas, Oakland and the hometown show Oct. 20 at Los Angeles' Greek Theatre.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 31, 2013 | By August Brown
There's one second of sound on John Legend's new album, "Love in the Future," that sums up his current artistic mission. It's on the delicate, gloomy track "Asylum," and the sound is a snare drum. Or rather a blast of raw, percussive white noise that punctuates Legend's future-soul tale of a love "where we both go crazy. " "We were leaning toward progressive, cool samples with space and minimalism," Legend said. "How do you refresh a genre that's so traditional and classic?" Although Legend is an R&B artist indebted to Sam Cooke's pristine phrasing and white-shoe piano ballads, his "Love in the Future" sounds remarkably modern.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 22, 2013 | By Gerrick D. Kennedy
A year after postponing his tour, John Legend is hitting the road this fall. The nine-time Grammy winner announced the trek, billed as the “Made to Love” tour, on Monday.   Legend will hit more than 20 cities across the U.S. starting Oct. 20 in Mashantucket, Conn. The tour wraps in L.A. on Dec. 1 with a gig at Nokia Theatre. R&B songstress (and popular reality star) Tamar Braxton will open.  The soul crooner recently released “Made to Love,” the second single from his long gestating fourth solo album, “Love in the Future.” Legend was originally set to tour last fall, but he shuttered the tour in order to complete the album, which he planned on unveiling while on the road.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 10, 2013 | By Mikael Wood, Los Angeles Times
This week in New York will.i.am - the founder and frontman of L.A.'s Black Eyed Peas - is to receive an honorary Clio Award in recognition of "the work and talent of those who push the boundaries of creativity in advertising and beyond," according to a release from the ad-business group that presents the awards. The prize certainly says something about his expansive skill set and his impressive trajectory. Over the last two decades the 38-year-old polymath born William Adams has transitioned from the West Coast hip-hop underground to a kind of global omnipresence rarely seen in music.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 8, 2013 | By Randy Lewis
Natalie Maines, the Dixie Chick whose criticism of then-President George W. Bush's handling of the Iraq War while on tour in Europe a decade ago got the group effectively banned from country radio, has resurfaced this week with her debut solo album, “Mother.” The lead-off track is a Beatles-esque arrangement of Eddie Vedder's “Without You” and, not surprisingly, it's generating a lot of enthusiastic feedback from Chicks fans. “So happy you are back in the studio,” Pat Limb Myers posted in the comments section of Maines' official website.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 24, 1995 | RICHARD CROMELIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"Give him some coffee! . . . Wake him up!" came the shouts from the crowd as the wait for Shane MacGowan's show dragged on at the House of Blues on Wednesday. When the Irish singer finally took the stage--making his first solo appearance here after leaving the legendary punk-folk band the Pogues in 1991--he didn't do anything to dispel his image as rock's hardest-drinking snaggletoothed genius.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 24, 2012 | By Steve Appleford, Special to the Los Angeles Times
There are things that Slash just doesn't want to talk about. And the timing was definitely not right a few weeks ago as the guitarist was preparing for a trip to Cleveland for his induction with Guns N' Roses into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. "I don't even want to talk about that. I don't want to touch it," Slash said in April, his usual friendly demeanor turning cool at the mere mention of GNR. It was during a week of drama and uncertainty about the ceremony, which had peaked days earlier with the arrival of a confrontational open letter to the Hall of Fame from singer Axl Rose.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 8, 2013 | By Randall Roberts, Los Angeles Times Pop Music Critic
Drawing conclusions on the music of Tyler the Creator based on his shocking way with language is like trying to explain the plot of a comic book by noting how much red ink is used. It's not only unfair, but inaccurately draws the Los Angeles-based rapper and founder of the Odd Future crew as one-dimensional, which he most certainly is not. On "Wolf," Tyler's third solo album, the producer, rapper, comedic actor and storyteller revels in his many dimensions, and has released his best album to date - even if it's too long and too sonically flat to confirm his place as a top-rate producer.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 2013 | By Gerrick D. Kennedy
The-Dream has an album to promote, but when you have friends in high places (Jay-Z, Rihanna and Kanye West, to name a few) calling for hits, it's difficult to keep focus. During a recent visit to "The Angie Martinez Show" in New York City, the radio show host couldn't resist the urge to inquire about the producer-singer's work on a slew of high-profile projects, including Beyoncé's upcoming album. While joking about getting in hot water for discussing his work with the pop diva, The-Dream let it slip that Jay-Z was making progress on his first solo album in more than three years.
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