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ENTERTAINMENT
November 30, 2012 | By Randall Roberts, Los Angeles Times Pop Music Critic
Samuel Yirga “Guzo” (Real World) Samuel Yirga is a pianist from Ethiopia whose debut record, “Guzo,” sits somewhere in that fertile ground where jazz mingles with R&B and funk to create soulful beauty. Recorded in Addis Ababa and at Real World Studios outside of Bristol, England, with producer Nick Page (best known to aging electronica heads for co-founding Transglobal Underground), the album suggests an updated, dynamic version of Ethiojazz, the rhythmic movement that soundtracked the country in the 1950s and '60s, most prominently through the music of Mulatu Astatke.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 2005 | Josef Woodard, Special to The Times
In 1998, composer-pianist David Rosenboom completed a solo piano tour de force, "Bell Solaris," for his fellow pianist Katrina Krimsky, in a form involving variations on a theme. In an expanded, theatricalized version that he premiered Thursday at REDCAT, he lavishes new variations upon his earlier ones, in visual and technological as well as musical terms.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 4, 1993
The first wonder of the piano, when it was invented by Bartolomeo Cristofori in 1709, was that unlike earlier keyboard instruments, it could play both soft and loud, piano and forte in Italian, whence the name pianoforte and, by abbreviation, piano. Only gradually did performers discover a second wonder in the new instrument. What had at first seemed a defect--the way the pianoforte's tones hung in the air--became the key to a breathtaking new musical possibility.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 1997 | JOSEF WOODARD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
There was a time, more than 20 years ago, when someone hailing a cab in New York City might have been picked up by a certain aspiring composer, namely Philip Glass. Before his innovative theater piece, "Einstein on the Beach," the 1976 collaboration with Robert Wilson that made him a celebrity, Glass often manned a cab by day. In his off hours, he invented his own, soon-to-be popular mode of minimalism. That, by now, is something of a romantic footnote in his personal history.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 20, 2000 | JEREMY EICHLER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
As he approaches the end of his one-year sabbatical from the Los Angeles Philharmonic, Esa-Pekka Salonen took the stage of Carnegie's Weill Recital Hall on Sunday for a rare evening that brought together his disparate roles as conductor and composer. For this concert, part of Carnegie Hall's Making Music series, he was both at once, leading the admirable Ensemble Sospeso and special guests in three of his own recent works as well as music by Witold Lutoslawski and Steven Stucky.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 1986 | ALBERT GOLDBERG
According to the publicity, the goal of the newly formed Los Angeles Orchestral Ensemble is no less than "a fusion of the arts"--maybe a kind of midtown Los Angeles Gesamtkunstwerk. But nothing that pretentious occurred in the small recital hall of the Wilshire Ebell Club on Sunday afternoon. The ensemble was small, the audience was small, the music played was small. Nevertheless, the event was pleasant, and in a modest way interesting.
NEWS
April 18, 2002 | JOSEF WOODARD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Opportunities to hear single-composer concerts, portraits of an artist rather than just a glimpse, are all too rare. They do occur, however, in academia, as when USC student and faculty musicians performed works by accomplished composer Frederick Lesemann on Tuesday at the Newman Recital Hall on campus.
NEWS
April 18, 2002 | JOSEF WOODARD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Opportunities to hear single-composer concerts, portraits of an artist rather than just a glimpse, are all too rare. They do occur, however, in academia, as when USC student and faculty musicians performed works by accomplished composer Frederick Lesemann on Tuesday at the Newman Recital Hall on campus.
NEWS
March 28, 2002 | DANIEL CARIAGA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The world premiere of Hyo-shin Na's "Piano Study 3" was a highlight of Susan Svrcek's latest recital in the Piano Spheres series Tuesday at Neighborhood Church in Pasadena. A commission by the enterprising organization, it is a technically demanding piece for the instrumentalist, an intriguing one for the listener. It lives in the treble regions of the instrument, visiting the lower octaves seldom.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 30, 2001
* BILLY JOEL: "Opus 1 -10: Fantasies & Delusions" Richard Joo, piano Sony Classical/Columbia Records * * * STEVEN MACKEY: "Tuck and Roll," "Lost and Found," "Eating Greens" Steven Mackey, guitar; New World Symphony Michael Tilson Thomas, conductor BM G Eight years ago, Billy Joel swore off pop song writing to devote himself to composing for piano, inspired, he says, by the 19th century classical composers he played as child. But inspired is maybe the wrong word.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 20, 2000 | JEREMY EICHLER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
As he approaches the end of his one-year sabbatical from the Los Angeles Philharmonic, Esa-Pekka Salonen took the stage of Carnegie's Weill Recital Hall on Sunday for a rare evening that brought together his disparate roles as conductor and composer. For this concert, part of Carnegie Hall's Making Music series, he was both at once, leading the admirable Ensemble Sospeso and special guests in three of his own recent works as well as music by Witold Lutoslawski and Steven Stucky.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 8, 1999 | DANIEL CARIAGA
Barber's solo piano music is not extensive, but it is amusing and witty; in Pollack's authoritative performances it occupies just 72 minutes' playing time. Except for the extraordinary Piano Sonata of 1949, however, all this attractive, virtuosic music remains steadfastly lightweight; it could give eclecticism a bad name. Still, Pollack makes it all sound important, embracing the sonata wholeheartedly, using deep resources and myriad details. The lighter material he imbues with elegance.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 30, 2012 | By Randall Roberts, Los Angeles Times Pop Music Critic
Samuel Yirga “Guzo” (Real World) Samuel Yirga is a pianist from Ethiopia whose debut record, “Guzo,” sits somewhere in that fertile ground where jazz mingles with R&B and funk to create soulful beauty. Recorded in Addis Ababa and at Real World Studios outside of Bristol, England, with producer Nick Page (best known to aging electronica heads for co-founding Transglobal Underground), the album suggests an updated, dynamic version of Ethiojazz, the rhythmic movement that soundtracked the country in the 1950s and '60s, most prominently through the music of Mulatu Astatke.
NEWS
March 28, 2002 | DANIEL CARIAGA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The world premiere of Hyo-shin Na's "Piano Study 3" was a highlight of Susan Svrcek's latest recital in the Piano Spheres series Tuesday at Neighborhood Church in Pasadena. A commission by the enterprising organization, it is a technically demanding piece for the instrumentalist, an intriguing one for the listener. It lives in the treble regions of the instrument, visiting the lower octaves seldom.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 26, 1997 | NATALIE NICHOLS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The first official solo performance by Stone Temple Pilots singer Scott Weiland since his highly publicized drug rehab added some flair to an otherwise business-as-usual acoustic benefit concert Monday at the Roxy. Headlining the seventh annual "Gimme Shelter" fund-raiser with an ad hoc band that included Daniel Lanois on guitar, Weiland offered a 30-minute set of new material that revealed an artist who's not been idle at his craft during his time out of the limelight.
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