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ENTERTAINMENT
February 19, 2013 | By Rob Weinert-Kendt
Is the ecstasy and agony of Mike Daisey finally over? It's been nearly a year since the monologuist was first feted, then pilloried, for his solo play "The Agony and the Ecstasy of Steve Jobs. " This mix of tech-geek autobiography and labor exposé was running at New York's Public Theater in January 2012 when the popular public-radio show "This American Life" aired a scalding excerpt in which Daisey described brutal working conditions he said he witnessed at Foxconn, a Chinese plant that manufactures Apple products.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 5, 2012 | By David Ng
Artist Kathy Butterly, whose abstract ceramic sculptures are noted for their colorful and playful aspects, has won the Smithsonian's Contemporary Arts Award for 2012. The biennial honor comes with a $25,000 prize and is intended to recognize artists younger than 50 who have produced a significant body of work. Butterly typically creates small-scale ceramic sculptures that are brightly colored and abstract in shape. Her work is often compared to the sculptures of Ron Nagle and Ken Price. The five-member jury that chose this year's winner wrote that Butterly's "small, nuanced, labor-intensive sculptures are richly communicative and wildly imaginative.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 14, 2012 | By Jori Finkel, Los Angeles Times
Walking into Friedrich Kunath's show at Blum & Poe is like stumbling into a dream that is at once madcap and melancholy. The paintings bring together a mishmash of images, whether goofy cartoon animals or brooding men from 19th-century German etchings. On the floor is a trail of giant shoes - replicas of men's penny loafers filled not with feet but with odd objects like a massive matchstick or a big banana. The deeper you walk into the show, the closer you get to the dreamer-character himself, a painfully lonely man who ultimately appears in two forms: a lumpy sculpture slumped on the floor and a character in a 17-minute film shown adrift on land and at sea. The film is called "You Go Your Way and I'll Go Crazy.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 2012 | By Philip Brandes
Vincent Van Gogh didn't just work at things - he attacked them, eulogizes his grieving brother Theo in the Next Arena's revival of “Vincent.” As performed by French-born actor Jean-Michel Richaud, this insightful and often moving 1981 solo show penned by Leonard Nimoy transcends the usual clichés surrounding the high-maintenance artist with the tortured relationship to his aural appendage. Nimoy knows from ears, of course, but his script looks beyond merely sensational biographical episodes to the unifying themes in three principal facets of Vincent's adult life: God, love and art. As Theo admits during an imaginary tribute conducted a week after his brother's death, Vincent pursued all three with perhaps an overdeveloped sense of drama, but always with passion.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 20, 2012 | By David Pagel
Mimi Lauter's gigantic pastel drawings at Marc Selwyn Fine Art are the visual equivalent of having a word on the tip of your tongue and not being able to say it: frustrating experiences that highlight some of the differences between minds and bodies. But the young artist's richly textured fields of brooding, autumnal colors, with fine patterns carved into their fleshy surfaces, are more complicated - and resplendent - than that. More than just about any other artist of her generation, Lauter excites our desire to know what we are looking at only to short-circuit such unimaginative, even mechanical activities.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 2012 | By Randy Lewis
This post has been updated. See note below for details. Bob Dylan famously called Smokey Robinson “America's greatest living poet” for the exquisite beauty, pain and affection in lyrics to “Tracks of My Tears,” “Tears of a Clown” and so many other songs Robinson wrote and sang during his heyday at Motown in the 1960s and 1970s. Now, Robinson's ready to share a side of his poetry largely separated from music in “Words,” a spoken-word program built around several long-form poems that Robinson will present in a pair of shows this weekend in North Hollywood.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 21, 2012 | By David Pagel
The five paintings in Scott Greenwalt's first solo show in Los Angeles take viewers back to the 1960s by way of the mind-blowing trips that acid made possible. But rather than inviting aging boomers to get all misty eyed about yesteryear, the San Francisco artist's peculiar pictures at Weekend function like flashbacks gone bad. The initial sense of familiarity they trigger in your lizard brain disintegrates as you slip past the point of no return into an absurd world unlike any you have ever visited - in body, mind or spirit.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 3, 2012 | By Jamie Wetherbe
Mike Tyson is back in the ring -- this time battling Broadway critics. The former heavyweight champ's one-man confessional, “Mike Tyson: Undisputed Truth,” opened at the Longacre Theatre on Thursday night for a short run through Aug. 12. Written by his third wife, Kiki, the show spans Tyson's rough childhood, his triumphs and tragedies in and out of the ring and, later, his sobriety and conversion to veganism. The tell-all is also dotted with Tyson's many public indiscretions: arrests, facial tattoos, drugs, running through a $400-million fortune and, yes, that ear-gnawing incident during his infamous match with Evander Holyfield.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 20, 2012 | By August Brown
Fans shut out of Kaskade's Staples Center set on July 27 now have another chance to see it. The San Clemente-based producer and DJ announced that he'll live-stream the groundbreaking set, the first solo show from an electronica headliner at the venue, at sites including his homepage , Facebook and the YouTube channel of his label, Ultra Records. He'll also be taping the show, the marquee date of his "Freaks of Nature" tour, for a DVD package planned for release later this year and will host an after-party at Exchange LA immediately following his Staples show.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 29, 2012 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
He roams the night in menacing military police garb in search of homosexuals. No, he's not cruising the bars of West Hollywood, the Castro or Chelsea. He's the head of Uganda'sspecial task force for the country's Anti-Homosexuality Bill. Funny, isn't it, the way the words "probe" and "penetrative" always seem to be on his lips? He insists his nation won't "bend over" for homosexuality and believes that the enforcement of the "penal code" is way too "soft. " Satire plays only a small part in Ntare Guma Mbaho Mwine's solo show "A Missionary Position," which is receiving its world premiere at REDCAT in an artfully staged production that runs through this weekend.
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