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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 23, 2000
American Ballet Theatre soloist Giuseppe Picone has been injured and will not dance the role of the prince today in the company's production of "Cinderella" at the Orange County Performing Arts Center in Costa Mesa. Picone, scheduled to dance opposite Paloma Herrera, also missed Thursday evening's performance. Herrera will dance with Marcelo Gomes this afternoon. (714) 556-2787.
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SCIENCE
April 7, 2014 | By Karen Kaplan
What makes old violins crafted by members of the Stradivari family so much better than violins produced today? Nothing, according to a new study in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. In a musical version of the classic Coke versus Pepsi taste tests, scientists teamed up with experts who make, play and sell violins to see whether there's any substance to the widespread belief that old violins are superior to newer models. Just as with soda, the researchers discovered that highly accomplished violin soloists couldn't tell the difference between old and new instruments.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 30, 1987 | MARTIN BERNHEIMER, Times Music Critic
Peter Ilyich Tchaikovsky is alive, loud, flashy, gushy, slushy and well in Orange County. Wednesday night at the Performing Arts Center, Keith Clark and the Pacific Symphony offered their subscribers a soulful orgy of hum-along romanticism. The faithful responded by applauding at every opportunity--sometimes despite the conductor's pained disapproval--and by standing, cheering, whomping and whistling when the whiz-bang cadences beckoned.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 20, 2013 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
The Los Angeles Philharmonic's monthlong 10th-anniversary celebration of the opening of Walt Disney Concert Hall entered Phase 2 on Friday night. Esa-Pekka Salonen was back. And it was old-home week. The former music director's old Finnish friends were on hand for the premiere of Magnus Lindberg's Cello Concerto No. 2, written for soloist Anssi Karttunen. There were other old friends as well - Debussy and Bartók. Both composers were mainstays of Salonen's 17 years leading the L.A. Phil.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 22, 2011 | By Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times
Sofia Cosma, a concert pianist who defied long odds to rebuild her career after seven years in Soviet prison camps and later established herself as a performer and teacher in Southern California, died of natural causes Feb. 12 at a nursing home in Oxnard, said her daughter, Ilona Scott. Cosma was 96. Cosma's musical aspirations were dashed in 1941 when Nazi Germany invaded the Soviet Union. Cosma, who was Jewish, was attempting to rejoin her family in Latvia when she was arrested and incarcerated in a Siberian prison.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 20, 2013 | By Dana Ferguson
In its first 10 years Disney Hall became more than a home for the Los Angeles Philharmonic, it also became a destination for photographing advertisements and filming commercials, television shows and movies. Howard Sherman, vice president of operations at the Music Center, said the product of Frank Gehry's imagination works on film because the hall can be so many things to so many people. "If they want futuristic stainless steel curves, this is where they come. If they want a space to do a formal black tie gala in a traditional environment, this is where they can come," he said.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 12, 2011 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
Fittingly, "The Lord of the Rings in Concert: The Fellowship of the Ring" is an epic undertaking. "It's such a huge score," said composer Howard Shore, who won an Oscar for his work on Peter Jackson's 2001 first installment in his ambitious "Lord of the Rings" trilogy based on the J.R.R. Tolkien beloved fantasy novel. "It's nearly three hours. It is really difficult to do. It requires 225 people on stage to play the music, a symphony orchestra and chorus. " For the performance, which comes to the Honda Center in Anaheim on Saturday, Ludwig Wicki conducts the Munich Symphony Orchestra, Pacific Chorale, Phoenix Boys Choir and soloist soprano Kaitlyn Lusk.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 21, 2012 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
In March 2010, Robin Ticciati, a 26-year-old British wonder, made his debut conducting the Los Angeles Philharmonic. A Simon Rattle protégé, Ticciati was at the time a newly appointed music director of the Scottish Chamber Orchestra and was said, perhaps, to be the next Dudamel. Since then his career has continued to rocket, as every year he adds more prestigious orchestras and opera companies to his guest-conducting card. He is principal guest conductor of the Bamberg Symphony, one of the best in Germany.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 5, 1986
The Pasadena Symphony will open the 1986-87 season on Oct. 25 with music director Jorge Mester conducting works by Kodaly, Dohnanyi, Ravel and Stravinsky in Pasadena Civic Auditorium. Pianist David Korevaar will be soloist in Stravinsky's Concerto for Piano and Winds. On Nov. 22, Mester will conduct music of Dvorak, Bartok and the Cello Concerto by Peter Mennin, with Gary Hoffman as soloist. An orchestral program on Jan. 17 lists works by Mozart and Shostakovich.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 5, 1988
The off-stage trumpet soloist in Beethoven's "Leonore" Overture No. 3 at the Music Center on Friday was Los Angeles Philharmonic principal Thomas Stevens, not Donald Green as reported in The Times on Monday. Green planed the off-stage part in "Leonore" No. 2.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 20, 2013 | By Dana Ferguson
In its first 10 years Disney Hall became more than a home for the Los Angeles Philharmonic, it also became a destination for photographing advertisements and filming commercials, television shows and movies. Howard Sherman, vice president of operations at the Music Center, said the product of Frank Gehry's imagination works on film because the hall can be so many things to so many people. "If they want futuristic stainless steel curves, this is where they come. If they want a space to do a formal black tie gala in a traditional environment, this is where they can come," he said.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 28, 2013 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
They laughed when Leon Botstein became president of Bard College in 1975, at the very idea that a 28-year-old could enliven a venerable New York liberal arts college. They laughed in 1990 when Botstein started the Bard Music Festival, which had the appearance of a vanity operation for his own seemingly dubious ambitions as a conductor. They laughed once more when he became music director of the American Symphony Orchestra 20 years ago, especially after some rocky early performances and scathing reviews.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 24, 2013 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
"The Rite of Spring," having reached the 100th celebratory anniversary of its clamorous Paris premiere this spring, is the new "Four Seasons. " Igor Stravinsky's ballet score has become ubiquitous. Rafael Frühbeck de Burgos conducted the Los Angeles Philharmonic at the Hollywood Bowl on Tuesday night in what might have seemed like yet another "Rite. " But it wasn't. The Spanish conductor produced a sizzling riot of instrumental color that properly and excitingly reminded us of what all the fuss is about.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 1, 2013 | By Don Heckman
Paul Smith, a jazz pianist, arranger-composer and music director for stars such as Sammy Davis Jr., Anita O'Day, Mel Torme, Ella Fitzgerald, Doris Day, the Andrews Sisters, Sarah Vaughan and Rosemary Clooney, has died. He was 91. Smith died of heart failure Saturday at the Torrance Memorial Medical Center, publicist Alan Eichler said. At 6 feet 5, with hands that easily spanned the piano keyboard well beyond octaves, Smith was an impressive sight on stage. Playing with a versatility comparable to that of Oscar Peterson and a harmonic richness similar to the work of Bill Evans, he was both a brilliant soloist and an accompanist who was highly praised by the many singers with whom he performed.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 22, 2013 | By Randall Roberts, Los Angeles Times Pop Music Critic, This post has a correction. See below for details
One particular moment stood out during Barack Obama's first four years as a musical-minded president, and he delivered it in sweet falsetto. Offered with casual confidence at the Apollo Theater in Harlem almost exactly a year ago at a fundraiser, the president of the United States cooed the melody from "Let's Stay Together" by the Rev. Al Green. It was a mere three words along with an introductory wail - "Heeey, let's stay together" - but within it lay a quote packed with subtext.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 6, 2012 | By Gary Goldstein
"Lost Angels: Skid Row Is My Home" is an absorbing, at times heartbreaking look at several former and current denizens of downtown L.A.'s Skid Row, a 50-block area that one observer here respectfully calls "an open asylum for the mentally ill. " As the documentary's director Thomas Napper makes clear, the neighborhood is that and so much more. True, it's a community wracked by the forces of gentrification, drug addiction, crime and, some contend, an overly assertive police presence.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 20, 1993
The Japan America Symphony Orchestra of Los Angeles, led by its music director, Heiichiro Ohyama, will present four concerts during its new season. The first three will be at the Japan America Theatre in Little Tokyo. The orchestral season begins Oct. 3, with a program of music by Ifukube, Prokofiev and Beethoven at which Masuko Ushioda will be soloist in the Second Violin Concerto by Prokofiev.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 13, 1986 | From Times Wire Services
Violinist David Rubinoff, whose playing on Eddie Cantor's radio show was heard each Sunday evening by millions of Americans during the dark days of the Depression, has died at age 89. Rubinoff died of respiratory arrest Monday night at a hospital here after a long battle with respiratory illness. Rubinoff was born in Russia, one of five children of a tobacco factory worker and a laundress. He was 5 when he persuaded his parents to buy him a violin.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 21, 2012 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
In March 2010, Robin Ticciati, a 26-year-old British wonder, made his debut conducting the Los Angeles Philharmonic. A Simon Rattle protégé, Ticciati was at the time a newly appointed music director of the Scottish Chamber Orchestra and was said, perhaps, to be the next Dudamel. Since then his career has continued to rocket, as every year he adds more prestigious orchestras and opera companies to his guest-conducting card. He is principal guest conductor of the Bamberg Symphony, one of the best in Germany.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 5, 2012 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
At 31, Gustavo Dudamel is no longer the youngest music director of a major orchestra. Krzysztof Urbanski is, at least for now. The 29-year-old Polish conductor, who made his West Coast debut with the Los Angeles Philharmonic on Tuesday night, is supposed to begin his second season with the Indianapolis Symphony next week. But the orchestra is in stalled contract negotiations with its players, and the Sept. 14 opening concert is threatened. This, instead, seems the moment for Indianapolis to do a Dudamel.
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