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Solomon Burke

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ENTERTAINMENT
July 21, 2002 | Robert Hilburn; Dean Kuipers; Steve Baltin; Randy Lewis; Natalie Nichols; Soren Baker
*** 1/2 SOLOMON BURKE "Don't Give Up on Me" Fat Possum Burke is one of the all-time great soul singers, an artist with the character and command of such legendary figures as Otis Redding, Ray Charles and Sam Cooke. But the Philadelphia native, who did his most acclaimed work for Atlantic Records in the '60s, has been off the pop radar screen for so long that he is probably known today only by soul cultists.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 11, 2010 | Valerie J. Nelson and Randall Roberts, Los Angeles Times
Solomon Burke, a pioneering singer-songwriter of so-called sweet soul music whose powerful ballads in the 1960s were a major influence on a generation of rock, R&B and pop vocalists, has died. He was in his early 70s. Burke died early Sunday morning of natural causes at an Amsterdam airport, his family announced on his website . He had flown there from Los Angeles for a concert. "He was the founding father of what was defined as soul music in America in the 1960s. He was a major player," Tom Reed, author of the 1992 book "The Black Music History of Los Angeles: Its Roots," told The Times on Sunday.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 26, 1994 | STEVE APPLEFORD
Show-biz pageantry certainly has its place, but why bother when it only obscures the massive vocal talent of a veteran soul man like Solomon Burke? At the second of two shows Friday at the House of Blues, Burke shared a crowded stage with no fewer than 40 people (musicians, singers, dancers, two sons and a daughter to wipe his sweaty brow), when all that really mattered was the voice . That Burke isn't as much a household name as Otis Redding or Al Green isn't for lack of ability.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 2005 | Randy Lewis, Times Staff Writer
Anyone coming into the presence of King Solomon ought to be armed with this bit of wisdom: prepare to take your shoes off and set a spell. Sitting on a gilt, bejeweled, red velvet-accented throne in the living room of his two-story West San Fernando Valley home, Solomon Burke, the man dubbed "the king of rock 'n' soul" in the 1960s, exudes an aura that's part beneficent monarch, part folksy Jed Clampett.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 11, 2010 | Valerie J. Nelson and Randall Roberts, Los Angeles Times
Solomon Burke, a pioneering singer-songwriter of so-called sweet soul music whose powerful ballads in the 1960s were a major influence on a generation of rock, R&B and pop vocalists, has died. He was in his early 70s. Burke died early Sunday morning of natural causes at an Amsterdam airport, his family announced on his website . He had flown there from Los Angeles for a concert. "He was the founding father of what was defined as soul music in America in the 1960s. He was a major player," Tom Reed, author of the 1992 book "The Black Music History of Los Angeles: Its Roots," told The Times on Sunday.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 2005 | Randy Lewis, Times Staff Writer
Anyone coming into the presence of King Solomon ought to be armed with this bit of wisdom: prepare to take your shoes off and set a spell. Sitting on a gilt, bejeweled, red velvet-accented throne in the living room of his two-story West San Fernando Valley home, Solomon Burke, the man dubbed "the king of rock 'n' soul" in the 1960s, exudes an aura that's part beneficent monarch, part folksy Jed Clampett.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 9, 2002
Solomon Burke seeks to reclaim his rightful place in the R&B pantheon, but can he work without the safety net of '60s oldies? Plus: why actors direct; playhouses seek a brand identity; and "The Danube Exodus" offers a journey back to a tumultuous time.
NEWS
July 25, 2002
* Solomon Burke, "Don't Give Up on Me," Fat Possum. Burke, one of the all-time great soul singers, had been off the pop radar screen for a few decades until last year, when he was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. This collection of songs written for Burke also includes contributions by such respected writers as Bob Dylan, Van Morrison, Tom Waits and Elvis Costello.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 1998 | ROBERT HILBURN
**** PERCY SLEDGE, "The Very Best of Percy Sledge" Rhino/Atlantic Percy Sledge sings the title phrase of "When a Man Loves a Woman" with such passion and conviction that the single stands as one of the defining records in American soul music. Though the record only spent two weeks at No. 1 on the pop charts in 1966, it is invariably included on lists of the all-time great singles and has been a radio staple for decades now.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 17, 2001 | ROBERT HILBURN, TIMES POP MUSIC CRITIC
There are usually one or two names on the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame's annual list of inductees that cause some younger pop fans to draw a blank--and it's no different this year. Even the most casual fan will recognize most of the artists who will be inducted at the hall of fame dinner Monday in New York: Aerosmith, Michael Jackson, Queen, Paul Simon, Steely Dan and Ritchie Valens. But Solomon Burke? The Flamingos? That's where some blanks may be drawn.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 11, 2002 | ROBERT HILBURN
The permit on the dressing room wall at the House of Blues in West Hollywood lists the capacity as 20, but twice that many people are shoehorned into the space--and most will be joining Solomon Burke on stage. "We need your immediate attention," demands the bear-sized Burke from the rear of the room. "We go on stage in 15 minutes. No drinking water on stage. No chewing gum. No talking. A hundred-dollar fine if anyone talks."
ENTERTAINMENT
August 11, 2002 | Robert Hilburn
A selected guide to Solomon Burke's albums: "If You Need Me/Rock 'n Soul" (Collectables). This 23-song album brings together Burke's first two Atlantic albums. They are both seminal moments in contemporary pop, with young Burke singing his heart out, backed by a small army of musicians (often a four-piece horn section, three or more guitarists, organ, piano, bass and backup singers).
ENTERTAINMENT
August 9, 2002
Solomon Burke seeks to reclaim his rightful place in the R&B pantheon, but can he work without the safety net of '60s oldies? Plus: why actors direct; playhouses seek a brand identity; and "The Danube Exodus" offers a journey back to a tumultuous time.
NEWS
July 25, 2002
* Solomon Burke, "Don't Give Up on Me," Fat Possum. Burke, one of the all-time great soul singers, had been off the pop radar screen for a few decades until last year, when he was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. This collection of songs written for Burke also includes contributions by such respected writers as Bob Dylan, Van Morrison, Tom Waits and Elvis Costello.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 21, 2002 | Robert Hilburn; Dean Kuipers; Steve Baltin; Randy Lewis; Natalie Nichols; Soren Baker
*** 1/2 SOLOMON BURKE "Don't Give Up on Me" Fat Possum Burke is one of the all-time great soul singers, an artist with the character and command of such legendary figures as Otis Redding, Ray Charles and Sam Cooke. But the Philadelphia native, who did his most acclaimed work for Atlantic Records in the '60s, has been off the pop radar screen for so long that he is probably known today only by soul cultists.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 17, 2001 | ROBERT HILBURN, TIMES POP MUSIC CRITIC
There are usually one or two names on the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame's annual list of inductees that cause some younger pop fans to draw a blank--and it's no different this year. Even the most casual fan will recognize most of the artists who will be inducted at the hall of fame dinner Monday in New York: Aerosmith, Michael Jackson, Queen, Paul Simon, Steely Dan and Ritchie Valens. But Solomon Burke? The Flamingos? That's where some blanks may be drawn.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 11, 2002 | ROBERT HILBURN
The permit on the dressing room wall at the House of Blues in West Hollywood lists the capacity as 20, but twice that many people are shoehorned into the space--and most will be joining Solomon Burke on stage. "We need your immediate attention," demands the bear-sized Burke from the rear of the room. "We go on stage in 15 minutes. No drinking water on stage. No chewing gum. No talking. A hundred-dollar fine if anyone talks."
ENTERTAINMENT
August 11, 2002 | Robert Hilburn
A selected guide to Solomon Burke's albums: "If You Need Me/Rock 'n Soul" (Collectables). This 23-song album brings together Burke's first two Atlantic albums. They are both seminal moments in contemporary pop, with young Burke singing his heart out, backed by a small army of musicians (often a four-piece horn section, three or more guitarists, organ, piano, bass and backup singers).
ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 1998 | ROBERT HILBURN
**** PERCY SLEDGE, "The Very Best of Percy Sledge" Rhino/Atlantic Percy Sledge sings the title phrase of "When a Man Loves a Woman" with such passion and conviction that the single stands as one of the defining records in American soul music. Though the record only spent two weeks at No. 1 on the pop charts in 1966, it is invariably included on lists of the all-time great singles and has been a radio staple for decades now.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 26, 1994 | STEVE APPLEFORD
Show-biz pageantry certainly has its place, but why bother when it only obscures the massive vocal talent of a veteran soul man like Solomon Burke? At the second of two shows Friday at the House of Blues, Burke shared a crowded stage with no fewer than 40 people (musicians, singers, dancers, two sons and a daughter to wipe his sweaty brow), when all that really mattered was the voice . That Burke isn't as much a household name as Otis Redding or Al Green isn't for lack of ability.
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