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Solomon Islands

WORLD
April 3, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
Thousands of residents camped out overnight on a hill above a devastated town in the western Solomon Islands after a tsunami washed away coastal villages, killing at least 13 people. The death toll was expected to rise. A wall of water reportedly 30 feet high struck the island of Choiseul and swept a third of a mile inland, while smaller but still destructive waves surged ashore elsewhere. Australian Broadcasting Corp.
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WORLD
April 2, 2007 | From the Associated Press
A massive earthquake struck off the Solomon Islands today, sending a tsunami crashing into villages on the country's west coast and leaving at least four people missing, officials said. The magnitude 8 quake triggered tsunami warnings throughout the South Pacific and as far north as Hawaii, although officials canceled the alert after the danger period passed.
WORLD
April 24, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
Police arrested a Solomon Islands opposition lawmaker today as he left the troubled nation's Parliament after its first session since the election of a new prime minister triggered two days of rioting. Police said Charles Dausabea was arrested for "intimidation" but gave no details. Rumors that China and Taiwan paid lawmakers to elect Snyder Rini as prime minister, denied by both nations, set off the riots.
WORLD
April 19, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
Mobs looted stores, torched buildings and cars, and pelted police with stones after lawmakers in the Solomon Islands elected a new prime minister associated with a previous administration accused of corruption. Seven police officers were injured, six of them Australians. The Australians are in the Solomon Islands to help end years of communal violence. The rioters were enraged that Snyder Rini was chosen prime minister despite his close ties to former leader Allan Kemakeza.
WORLD
October 28, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
Australia and New Zealand will start withdrawing troops from the Solomon Islands as a peacekeeping mission restores law and order. Australia sent 1,400 personnel in July as leader of a 2,225-strong force of soldiers and police from six nations. Direct intervention was seen as the only way to end years of fighting by ethnic militias. Australia said 800 of its personnel would return home by early December.
WORLD
October 17, 2003 | Richard C. Paddock and Richard Boudreaux, Times Staff Writers
Village chief Robert Satu believes he has a rare gift: the ability to summon wild dolphins. He stands in the bow of his small fishing boat, calls to the animals and asks them to swim toward his nets. Until recently, the dolphins would end up as dinner. Satu, 51, says he has used his talent to kill 483 dolphins during traditional hunts in this South Pacific nation, harvesting the meat to feed his village and the teeth to use as money.
WORLD
September 28, 2003 | Richard C. Paddock, Times Staff Writer
Six decades after U.S. soldiers landed here on Guadalcanal to drive out the Japanese, foreign troops have come back to this South Pacific nation, this time to halt years of ethnic fighting. The quick -- and bloodless -- restoration of law and order by a heavily armed five-nation force led by Australia has won enthusiastic praise from the public.
OPINION
August 3, 2003 | Ross Terrill, Ross Terrill's most recent book is "The New Chinese Empire." His "The Australians: The Way We Live Now" was published in 2000.
Los Angeles to Sydney brings a 17-hour time change but little political change. Here, "Bush-Blair-Howard" is code for the Iraq war triumvirate. Although Australia's contribution of 2,000 troops to the war was modest, thrice-elected Prime Minister John Howard has been almost as staunch a supporter of President Bush as has British Prime Minister Tony Blair. An Iraq-induced machismo marks Australian foreign policy.
WORLD
July 23, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
Mystery surrounded the whereabouts of Prime Minister Allan Kemakesa amid reports he had fled the capital, Honiara, fearing he could be kidnapped. Australian Broadcasting Corp. reported that he left the violence-racked city on a police patrol boat Tuesday night. An Australian-led force of 2,300 troops and police is due to arrive in the Solomon Islands on Thursday to help prop up Kemakesa's ailing administration.
TRAVEL
March 23, 2003 | Christopher Reynolds, Times Staff Writer
THE Solomon Islands are about 1,000 miles off Australia's northeast coast -- a long way from England's West Country, which is where we find Randall in the opening pages of this amusing, unassuming book. Randall is a teacher in his middle 30s, 10 years into a career of facing 14- and 15-year-olds, when a rare possibility falls into his path.
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