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Somali Americans

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WORLD
October 31, 2011 | By Robyn Dixon, Los Angeles Times
An Islamist group says an American militant of Somali origin carried out a suicide bombing against an African Union base on Saturday, killing at least 10 people in Mogadishu, and it released a suicide message that it says he recorded before the attack. Abdisalan Hussein Ali, 22, was among about 20 young Somali Americans from Minneapolis allegedly recruited since 2007 by the Shabab, a rebel group, to fight in Somalia. In an audio clip aired Sunday on a Somali radio station associated with the Shabab, a voice attributed to Ali said in English that jihad, or holy war, was the most important objective for Muslims and urged them not to "just chill out all day. " "It is not important that you become a doctor or you become some sort of engineer.
ARTICLES BY DATE
WORLD
September 26, 2013 | By Richard A. Serrano and Ken Dilanian
WASHINGTON - The CIA is adding operatives and resources to focus on the Somalia-based militant group the Shabab as the FBI sends scores of agents to help examine evidence taken from the rubble of the shopping mall massacre in Nairobi, U.S. officials say. The FBI is taking the lead in the investigation, while the CIA and other U.S. intelligence agencies are mining electronic data and quizzing informants in an effort to determine whether the Al...
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OPINION
July 14, 2010
If there were any doubts that the bloody conflict in Somalia could pose a threat to African stability, they were buried in the Ugandan capital of Kampala this week along with the 76 people killed in twin bombings orchestrated by Somalia's extremist Islamic militia known as Shabab. The attacks, which targeted fans watching the World Cup final on televisions at a rugby club and an Ethiopian restaurant, were, in fact, a triple blow against Uganda, Ethiopia and what the radical group perceives to be ungodly Western influences such as soccer.
WORLD
November 17, 2011 | By David S. Cloud and Ken Dilanian, Los Angeles Times
Kenya's government has made an urgent appeal to the Obama administration for the Pentagon to provide intelligence and logistical support to Kenya's faltering month-old military operation in Somalia against the Shabab, a powerful Al Qaeda-linked militia. Administration officials are considering the request, which came through the State Department, to provide military surveillance and reconnaissance that could include imagery from drone aircraft. Such aid would represent a significant expansion of U.S. involvement in the chaotic East African nation.
NATIONAL
March 12, 2009 | Rebecca Cole
There is no evidence that radicalized Somali American youths who have disappeared over the last two years are being trained abroad to attack the United States, intelligence and law enforcement officials told members of a Senate panel Wednesday. Although worrisome, their apparent recruitment by the Shabab , a militant group linked to Al Qaeda, is more likely to signify that they are motivated to help their country fight against Ethiopians, who invaded the country in 2006.
NATIONAL
August 5, 2010 | Ken Dilanian, Tribune Washington Bureau
Fourteen people have been accused of providing support to the Somali terrorist group Shabab in indictments unsealed Thursday that shed light on "a deadly pipeline" of funding and fighters to the group from cities across the United States, Atty. Gen. Eric H. Holder Jr. said. Most of those charged were U.S. citizens of Somali descent. It has long been known that disaffected Somali Americans were leaving their homes in Minnesota and other states to join Shabab, an Islamist army whose several thousand fighters are battling Somalia's weak government.
WORLD
September 26, 2013 | By Richard A. Serrano and Ken Dilanian
WASHINGTON - The CIA is adding operatives and resources to focus on the Somalia-based militant group the Shabab as the FBI sends scores of agents to help examine evidence taken from the rubble of the shopping mall massacre in Nairobi, U.S. officials say. The FBI is taking the lead in the investigation, while the CIA and other U.S. intelligence agencies are mining electronic data and quizzing informants in an effort to determine whether the Al...
WORLD
November 17, 2011 | By David S. Cloud and Ken Dilanian, Los Angeles Times
Kenya's government has made an urgent appeal to the Obama administration for the Pentagon to provide intelligence and logistical support to Kenya's faltering month-old military operation in Somalia against the Shabab, a powerful Al Qaeda-linked militia. Administration officials are considering the request, which came through the State Department, to provide military surveillance and reconnaissance that could include imagery from drone aircraft. Such aid would represent a significant expansion of U.S. involvement in the chaotic East African nation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 20, 2003 | Ann M. Simmons, Times Staff Writer
One community that claims him consists of industrious, hard-nosed cops, versed in street smarts. Another is a population of often-disoriented refugees, many traumatized by violence and war. His ability to merge both of these worlds has been the key to success for Abdiweli Heibeh -- the first Somali American to become a police officer in San Diego and possibly the first nationwide.
NATIONAL
December 7, 2009 | By Sebastian Rotella
The Obama administration, grappling with a spate of recent Islamic terrorism cases on U.S. soil, has concluded that the country confronts a rising threat from homegrown extremism. Anti-terrorism officials and experts see signs of accelerated radicalization among American Muslims, driven by a wave of English-language online propaganda and reflected in aspiring fighters' trips to hot spots such as Pakistan and Somalia. Europe had been the front line, the target of successive attacks and major plots, while the U.S. remained relatively calm.
WORLD
October 31, 2011 | By Robyn Dixon, Los Angeles Times
An Islamist group says an American militant of Somali origin carried out a suicide bombing against an African Union base on Saturday, killing at least 10 people in Mogadishu, and it released a suicide message that it says he recorded before the attack. Abdisalan Hussein Ali, 22, was among about 20 young Somali Americans from Minneapolis allegedly recruited since 2007 by the Shabab, a rebel group, to fight in Somalia. In an audio clip aired Sunday on a Somali radio station associated with the Shabab, a voice attributed to Ali said in English that jihad, or holy war, was the most important objective for Muslims and urged them not to "just chill out all day. " "It is not important that you become a doctor or you become some sort of engineer.
NATIONAL
August 5, 2010 | Ken Dilanian, Tribune Washington Bureau
Fourteen people have been accused of providing support to the Somali terrorist group Shabab in indictments unsealed Thursday that shed light on "a deadly pipeline" of funding and fighters to the group from cities across the United States, Atty. Gen. Eric H. Holder Jr. said. Most of those charged were U.S. citizens of Somali descent. It has long been known that disaffected Somali Americans were leaving their homes in Minnesota and other states to join Shabab, an Islamist army whose several thousand fighters are battling Somalia's weak government.
OPINION
July 14, 2010
If there were any doubts that the bloody conflict in Somalia could pose a threat to African stability, they were buried in the Ugandan capital of Kampala this week along with the 76 people killed in twin bombings orchestrated by Somalia's extremist Islamic militia known as Shabab. The attacks, which targeted fans watching the World Cup final on televisions at a rugby club and an Ethiopian restaurant, were, in fact, a triple blow against Uganda, Ethiopia and what the radical group perceives to be ungodly Western influences such as soccer.
NATIONAL
March 12, 2009 | Rebecca Cole
There is no evidence that radicalized Somali American youths who have disappeared over the last two years are being trained abroad to attack the United States, intelligence and law enforcement officials told members of a Senate panel Wednesday. Although worrisome, their apparent recruitment by the Shabab , a militant group linked to Al Qaeda, is more likely to signify that they are motivated to help their country fight against Ethiopians, who invaded the country in 2006.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 20, 2003 | Ann M. Simmons, Times Staff Writer
One community that claims him consists of industrious, hard-nosed cops, versed in street smarts. Another is a population of often-disoriented refugees, many traumatized by violence and war. His ability to merge both of these worlds has been the key to success for Abdiweli Heibeh -- the first Somali American to become a police officer in San Diego and possibly the first nationwide.
OPINION
August 25, 2006
Re "DEA's Khat Sting Stirs Up Somali 'Cultural Clash,' " Aug. 22 I am not particularly surprised to see the Drug Enforcement Administration in Seattle arresting a bunch of Somali Americans for using their native beverage, khat. With effects very similar to strong coffee, it may well have been becoming a competitor to java in Seattle. What bothers me most about the big khat bust is the DEA's priorities. Is there any valid reason that khat should be illegal and vodka legal? Seriously, in this age of growing international terrorism, surely our federal agents have far better things to do than this.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 16, 2014 | By Jeffrey Fleishman
Actors who portrayed men driven by desperation, greed, hate and opportunism received Academy Award nominations for best supporting actor Thursday in an intense spectrum of films that ranged from exposing Wall Street's financial sins to the battle against prejudice and death during America's AIDS epidemic. The nominees are: Jared Leto, a graceful, hard-bargaining transsexual in "Dallas Buyers Club"; Barkhad Abdi, a tenacious, rail-thin Somali pirate in “Captain Phillips”; Michael Fassbender, a pathological plantation owner in “12 Years a Slave”;  Bradley Cooper, a frenetic, ego-driven FBI agent in “American Hustle”; and Jonah Hill, a con-man drenched in perversity and excess in “The Wolf of Wall Street.” A number of the roles spoke to America's darker impulses, from the cruelties of the antebellum South to capitalism's ingenuity and the illicit designs it evokes.
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