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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 27, 1992
I applaud your editorial "The Heartbreak of Africa: Somalia" (Feb. 18). The tragedy of war-ravaged Somalia is one of the most disastrous humanitarian tragedies in today's world. Most of the victims are women and children, caught in the bloody cross-fire of inter-clan warfare. The Los Angeles-based International Medical Corps (IMC) has witnessed this tragedy firsthand. Since last November, the IMC has been--and still is--the only U.S. medical organization providing medical relief to the Somali people.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 14, 2013 | By Rebecca Keegan
Barkhad Abdi is used to finding his way in strange new places: At age 7, he moved with his family from war-torn Somalia to Yemen, where he learned Arabic on the soccer field. At 14, he moved to Minneapolis and learned English from Jay-Z songs and "Seinfeld" episodes. Now, at 27, Abdi has made himself at home in another new town - Hollywood - by starring opposite Tom Hanks in the film "Captain Phillips. " In director Paul Greengrass' fact-based thriller, which opened Friday, Abdi plays Muse, a Somali pirate who hijacks an American cargo ship and takes its captain hostage.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 25, 1991
While the world's attention has focused on how to drive Saddam Hussein out of Kuwait, the Somali people of the Horn of Africa have focused on how to drive dictator Mohamed Siad Barre out of Somalia. Since Dec. 30, when the rebels of the United Somali Congress began to wage a conventional war against the government of Siad Barre, some 2,000 Somalis are reported to have died while the rest of Mogadishu's (the capital city of Somalia) residents (2 million) have become refugees without a refuge.
WORLD
August 14, 2013 | By Carol J. Williams
One of the few relief organizations to tough out more than two decades of civil war, famine and chaos, Doctors Without Borders announced Wednesday that it is closing all operations in Somalia because of "extreme abuses" by armed factions and government indifference toward them. “In choosing to kill, attack, and abduct humanitarian aid workers, these armed groups, and the civilian authorities who tolerate their actions, have sealed the fate of countless lives in Somalia,” Unni Karunakara, the international medical group's president, said in a scathing statement about the conditions driving the relief group to leave after 22 years.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 14, 2013 | By Rebecca Keegan
Barkhad Abdi is used to finding his way in strange new places: At age 7, he moved with his family from war-torn Somalia to Yemen, where he learned Arabic on the soccer field. At 14, he moved to Minneapolis and learned English from Jay-Z songs and "Seinfeld" episodes. Now, at 27, Abdi has made himself at home in another new town - Hollywood - by starring opposite Tom Hanks in the film "Captain Phillips. " In director Paul Greengrass' fact-based thriller, which opened Friday, Abdi plays Muse, a Somali pirate who hijacks an American cargo ship and takes its captain hostage.
NEWS
June 29, 2001 | From Associated Press
Somalia's new police battled factional militiamen opposed to the nation's transitional government, leaving five people dead Thursday, the force's second day on the job. More than 20 people, most of them civilians, were wounded in the fighting in south Mogadishu between faction leader Hussein Mohammed Aidid's militia and the government's police force, witnesses said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 18, 1992
As a physician who recently returned from war-torn Somalia, I want to commend you for your coverage of the tragic situation in Somalia ("Where a Gun Is a Meal Ticket," Aug. 11). From May 5 to June 4, I volunteered with the Los Angeles-based International Medical Corps (IMC), the only U.S. medical organization working in Mogadishu during the crisis. I am a 74-year-old retired surgeon who has worked in VA hospitals, and so have seen the aftermath of war. But at Digfer Hospital in Mogadishu, I witnessed firsthand the horrors that the fighting is wreaking on the Somali people, most of whom are children and women.
WORLD
June 14, 2006 | Robyn Dixon, Times Staff Writer
Somalian Prime Minister Ali Mohammed Gedi condemned the international community Tuesday for standing by while his countrymen suffered during years of bloodshed, and he called for concrete support for the country's transitional government. "It is inhuman to watch and wait and see. It's unacceptable to watch this punishment of the Somali people," Gedi told diplomats gathered here for a seven-nation conference on Somalia's future.
NEWS
December 9, 1993 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Hey you! Lie down! Lie down!" the young Marine shouted, pointing an assault rifle at Ahmed Hussein Fidow's head when it popped up, ever so briefly, to welcome U.S. Marines ashore here. It was Dec. 9, 1992, which seems a lifetime ago--the opening night of a year that went so wrong. But in a little-known scene that was to foreshadow so much, the Marine's warning wasn't enough. "Welcome Marines! Welcome in Mogadishu!" Fidow persisted from his prone position.
NEWS
October 8, 1993 | From Reuters
Text of President Clinton's address from the Oval Office on U.S. policy in Somalia: My fellow Americans, today I want to talk with you about our nation's military involvement in Somalia. A year ago, we all watched with horror as Somali children and their families lay dying by the tens of thousands, dying the slow, agonizing death of starvation, a starvation brought on not only by drought, but also by the anarchy that then prevailed in that country.
WORLD
September 16, 2012 | By Robyn Dixon, Los Angeles Times
MOGADISHU, Somalia - The great part about being mayor of Mogadishu is that you get to reinvent a city so thoroughly taken apart by more than 20 years of chaos and war, it's almost a clean slate. The hard part: staying alive. Death threats come with the job. Outside Mohamed Ahmed Noor's office there's a huge sign, "Welcome to Mogadishu. " At his entry sits a guard with a machine gun, looped several times with ropes of ammunition. To get inside, you must squeeze through a hubbub of waiting people so dense you wonder how he gets any work done.
WORLD
August 6, 2011 | By Jeffrey Fleishman and Lutfi Sheriff Mohammed
The Shabab militant Islamic group retreated early Saturday from war-battered Mogadishu, leaving residents to awaken to hushed streets as the government claimed victory against extremist forces that had tormented the Somali capital for years. It was not clear whether the move signaled a lasting withdrawal by the Al Qaeda-linked group or was a tactical shift in preparation for a counterattack. The rebels have been pounded in recent months by 9,000 government-backed African Union soldiers and U.S. drone strikes that have targeted Shabab commanders.
WORLD
April 30, 2007 | Lutfi Mohammed, Special to The Times
Somalis who fled the worst fighting this city has seen since the early 1990s have been warily returning, but few here said they believed the transitional government had crushed Islamic militias and ushered in an era of peace. Mogadishu residents Sunday recounted horrific stories of civilian casualties and massive structural damage during recent shelling by government and allied Ethiopian forces attempting to drive Islamic militants from the capital.
WORLD
June 14, 2006 | Robyn Dixon, Times Staff Writer
Somalian Prime Minister Ali Mohammed Gedi condemned the international community Tuesday for standing by while his countrymen suffered during years of bloodshed, and he called for concrete support for the country's transitional government. "It is inhuman to watch and wait and see. It's unacceptable to watch this punishment of the Somali people," Gedi told diplomats gathered here for a seven-nation conference on Somalia's future.
NEWS
June 29, 2001 | From Associated Press
Somalia's new police battled factional militiamen opposed to the nation's transitional government, leaving five people dead Thursday, the force's second day on the job. More than 20 people, most of them civilians, were wounded in the fighting in south Mogadishu between faction leader Hussein Mohammed Aidid's militia and the government's police force, witnesses said.
NEWS
December 9, 1993 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Hey you! Lie down! Lie down!" the young Marine shouted, pointing an assault rifle at Ahmed Hussein Fidow's head when it popped up, ever so briefly, to welcome U.S. Marines ashore here. It was Dec. 9, 1992, which seems a lifetime ago--the opening night of a year that went so wrong. But in a little-known scene that was to foreshadow so much, the Marine's warning wasn't enough. "Welcome Marines! Welcome in Mogadishu!" Fidow persisted from his prone position.
WORLD
August 14, 2013 | By Carol J. Williams
One of the few relief organizations to tough out more than two decades of civil war, famine and chaos, Doctors Without Borders announced Wednesday that it is closing all operations in Somalia because of "extreme abuses" by armed factions and government indifference toward them. “In choosing to kill, attack, and abduct humanitarian aid workers, these armed groups, and the civilian authorities who tolerate their actions, have sealed the fate of countless lives in Somalia,” Unni Karunakara, the international medical group's president, said in a scathing statement about the conditions driving the relief group to leave after 22 years.
NEWS
October 25, 1993 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On a warm afternoon last week, Abdulkadir Yahya Ali and his wife, Suad, spent several painful hours on the veranda of their newly opened "Peace Hotel," looking to the day next March when the last American soldier leaves this country. "The U.N. will collapse. Civil war will resume," concluded Yahya, a Somali intellectual, U.N. political officer and former U.S. Embassy protocol chief who gambled his life and his future on the troubled American-led U.N. mission to pacify and rebuild Somalia.
NEWS
October 25, 1993 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On a warm afternoon last week, Abdulkadir Yahya Ali and his wife, Suad, spent several painful hours on the veranda of their newly opened "Peace Hotel," looking to the day next March when the last American soldier leaves this country. "The U.N. will collapse. Civil war will resume," concluded Yahya, a Somali intellectual, U.N. political officer and former U.S. Embassy protocol chief who gambled his life and his future on the troubled American-led U.N. mission to pacify and rebuild Somalia.
NEWS
October 8, 1993 | From Reuters
Text of President Clinton's address from the Oval Office on U.S. policy in Somalia: My fellow Americans, today I want to talk with you about our nation's military involvement in Somalia. A year ago, we all watched with horror as Somali children and their families lay dying by the tens of thousands, dying the slow, agonizing death of starvation, a starvation brought on not only by drought, but also by the anarchy that then prevailed in that country.
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