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SPORTS
December 15, 1992 | RANDY HARVEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Returning home to Somalia after winning the 1,500 meters in track and field's 1987 World Championships, Abdi Bile discovered during a visit to the capital city of Mogadishu that he had inspired a running boom. "I couldn't believe how excited the young men were about my race," he said. "You couldn't drive in the streets because there were so many people running. I thought there must be a cross-country race going on, but I was told, 'No, it's just young people who want to run like you.'
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WORLD
August 28, 2012 | By Lutfi Sheriff Mohammed and Robyn Dixon, Los Angeles Times
MOGADISHU, Somalia - When she was 17, Samia Yusuf Omar experienced a brief moment in the international spotlight when she ran a 200-meter race representing Somalia at the 2008 Beijing Olympic Games. Omar finished far behind other sprinters in her qualifying heat, but as a female athlete competing in the Olympics for Somalia, a country known mainly for being a failed state, she made headlines. She also got hooked on a dream: Omar wanted to train as a runner and compete internationally for her country, and to earn money to support her family.
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SPORTS
December 15, 1992 | RANDY HARVEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Over dinner one recent night at a restaurant near the corner of Wilshire and Vermont in Los Angeles, Ahmed Abdi Dahir pointed toward Somalia's Olympic Committee. "It is all in here," he said, tapping his head with his forefinger. "We had a building in Mogadishu, but it, like everything else in the capital city, has been destroyed in the civil war. There is not even one file left, not one." Dahir is best known in the West as a humanitarian. As director of the Somali Relief Rehabilitation Assn.
SPORTS
December 15, 1992 | RANDY HARVEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Over dinner one recent night at a restaurant near the corner of Wilshire and Vermont in Los Angeles, Ahmed Abdi Dahir pointed toward Somalia's Olympic Committee. "It is all in here," he said, tapping his head with his forefinger. "We had a building in Mogadishu, but it, like everything else in the capital city, has been destroyed in the civil war. There is not even one file left, not one." Dahir is best known in the West as a humanitarian. As director of the Somali Relief Rehabilitation Assn.
SPORTS
August 4, 1992 | MIKE DOWNEY, The Times
Somalia was not expected to request a bid to the Olympics. It did. Abdi Bile, a distance runner too seriously injured to compete, carried his poverty-stricken and war-torn country's flag in the opening ceremony. Three non-competing members of his delegation followed. Somalia expected to compete in the Olympics. It didn't. Shidane Omar Ahmed, Somalia's only official entry, never got to Barcelona to run in the 400 meters.
WORLD
August 28, 2012 | By Lutfi Sheriff Mohammed and Robyn Dixon, Los Angeles Times
MOGADISHU, Somalia - When she was 17, Samia Yusuf Omar experienced a brief moment in the international spotlight when she ran a 200-meter race representing Somalia at the 2008 Beijing Olympic Games. Omar finished far behind other sprinters in her qualifying heat, but as a female athlete competing in the Olympics for Somalia, a country known mainly for being a failed state, she made headlines. She also got hooked on a dream: Omar wanted to train as a runner and compete internationally for her country, and to earn money to support her family.
SPORTS
December 15, 1992 | RANDY HARVEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Returning home to Somalia after winning the 1,500 meters in track and field's 1987 World Championships, Abdi Bile discovered during a visit to the capital city of Mogadishu that he had inspired a running boom. "I couldn't believe how excited the young men were about my race," he said. "You couldn't drive in the streets because there were so many people running. I thought there must be a cross-country race going on, but I was told, 'No, it's just young people who want to run like you.'
SPORTS
August 4, 1992 | MIKE DOWNEY, The Times
Somalia was not expected to request a bid to the Olympics. It did. Abdi Bile, a distance runner too seriously injured to compete, carried his poverty-stricken and war-torn country's flag in the opening ceremony. Three non-competing members of his delegation followed. Somalia expected to compete in the Olympics. It didn't. Shidane Omar Ahmed, Somalia's only official entry, never got to Barcelona to run in the 400 meters.
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