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May 1, 1993 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Few doubted that Gutalle, the Bandit of Baidoa, had lived up to his name. He was the chief of extortion at Baidoa airport, shaking down international relief agencies for hundreds of thousands of dollars in protection money as they sought to feed Somalia's starving millions. He killed at least 32 people, among them 17 women and children whom he mowed down in broad daylight with a battle-wagon outfitted with razor-blade bumpers.
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NEWS
May 1, 1993 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Few doubted that Gutalle, the Bandit of Baidoa, had lived up to his name. He was the chief of extortion at Baidoa airport, shaking down international relief agencies for hundreds of thousands of dollars in protection money as they sought to feed Somalia's starving millions. He killed at least 32 people, among them 17 women and children whom he mowed down in broad daylight with a battle-wagon outfitted with razor-blade bumpers.
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WORLD
November 23, 2007 | Edmund Sanders, Times Staff Writer
The president of Somalia on Thursday nominated a humanitarian administrator and former police colonel to become the next prime minister of the troubled Horn of Africa nation. Nur Hassan Hussein, who spent much of the last 20 years at the Somali Red Crescent Society, was praised as a neutral and respected leader. But it remained unclear whether his selection by President Abdullahi Yusuf would appease anti-government clans still waging a civil war in Mogadishu, the capital.
WORLD
December 25, 2006 | Abukar Albadri and Edmund Sanders, Special to The Times
Ethiopian jets pounded Islamic-held positions in southern Somalia, a sharp escalation Sunday of a conflict that diplomats fear could ignite a regional war. Several hundred people have been killed in five days of fighting between Ethiopian forces and Somalia's Islamic militias. Witnesses and officials said early morning strikes by Ethiopian planes killed about 80 fighters and civilians and wounded an additional 300 in the town of Beledweyne, which has been held by Somalia's Islamic Courts Union.
WORLD
January 23, 2007 | Edmund Sanders, Times Staff Writer
A fugitive Islamist leader praised recently by the U.S. government as a moderate who could bring much-needed public support to Somalia's transitional government has turned himself over to Kenyan authorities, American officials said Monday. Sheik Sharif Sheik Ahmed, a former teacher who rose to become chairman of the executive council of Somalia's Islamic Courts Union, is being held for questioning at a posh hotel in Nairobi, the officials said.
WORLD
January 12, 2007 | Edmund Sanders, Times Staff Writer
None of the three most-wanted Al Qaeda suspects believed to be hiding in southern Somalia were killed by a U.S. airstrike this week, a senior U.S. official here said Thursday. "The three high-value targets are still of intense interest to us," said the official, who requested anonymity because he was not authorized to speak on the record. The attack Sunday night by a U.S.
WORLD
December 29, 2006 | Edmund Sanders, Times Staff Writer
The headline in an Ethiopian newspaper drew familiar, if unflattering, comparisons to another nation's faster-thanexpected victory in a war abroad. "Mission Accomplished," blared Addis Ababa's Daily Monitor in a story about Ethiopian forces' triumph over Somalian Islamists this week. In 2003, the same phrase adorned a banner behind President Bush as he declared an end to major combat operations in Iraq, though the battles and bloodshed proved far from over.
WORLD
September 7, 2007 | Edmund Sanders, Times Staff Writer
In the latest challenge to Somalia's weak transitional government, an eclectic, but potentially powerful, alliance of Islamic sheiks, former warlords and ousted lawmakers is regrouping in this quaint Horn of Africa capital. For days, opposition leaders along with other exiled Somalis from across the world have been pouring into Asmara for what is being billed as a rival reconciliation conference to one in Mogadishu, the Somalian capital, that began in July and ended last week.
WORLD
January 7, 2007 | Edmund Sanders, Times Staff Writer
By launching a war against Somalia's Islamists, Ethiopia says it was drawing a line in the sand against religious extremism in East Africa. But without quick diplomacy and international aid, analysts caution that the war could radicalize the region's traditionally moderate Muslims. "This could bode ill for both Somalia and eastern Ethiopia, but perhaps even northern Kenya," said John Prendergast, Africa analyst at International Crisis Group, a conflict-resolution think tank based in Washington.
WORLD
October 2, 2007 | Edmund Sanders, Times Staff Writer
This struggling, low-profile nation is doing something virtually unheard of in Africa. It's turning down foreign aid.
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