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December 11, 1992 | MARK FINEMAN and SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Through the anarchy, war and terror that has been Somalia for two years, there has been one other constant: Every morning, the rickety wood tables at Mogadishu's Black Sea Market were flush with little green bundles of knotty stems that are the lifeblood of many Somalis. But Thursday, for the first time anyone here can remember, the Black Sea Market's tables were bare. A nation went cold turkey. The culprit, in the eyes of most Somalis, was the U.S. Marine Corps.
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NEWS
February 19, 1993 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Call them haughty, individualistic, clannish, rugged, crafty--maybe even selfish and merciless, Somalis say. But first understand why. In a word, the reason is camels. "Livestock is Somalia, and Somalia is livestock," Mohamoud Abdillahi, chairman of the national Livestock Commission, explained, waxing lyrical about his livelihood and favorite topic. "The camel is our dollar, part of our heritage, our life."
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NEWS
February 19, 1993 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Call them haughty, individualistic, clannish, rugged, crafty--maybe even selfish and merciless, Somalis say. But first understand why. In a word, the reason is camels. "Livestock is Somalia, and Somalia is livestock," Mohamoud Abdillahi, chairman of the national Livestock Commission, explained, waxing lyrical about his livelihood and favorite topic. "The camel is our dollar, part of our heritage, our life."
NEWS
January 11, 1993 | RAY TESSLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER; Times Staff Writer Ray Tessler, sent to Somalia along with Orange County-based Marines, recently returned from a tour of duty to the East African country
It was a fleeting scene, glimpsed in a blur from a passing truck. Miles outside of Mogadishu, on a narrow dirt lane in a hungry village, a father slowly walked beside his little son. He looked down, adoringly. The boy twisted his face upward. His legs were withered like the bony branches of a sapling. Starvation and disease had destroyed them. Painfully, he pulled himself along beside his dad, walking through the dirt on his hands and gnarled knees.
NEWS
January 5, 1993 | DANIEL WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At the afternoon market for qat, the leaves that Somalis chew as a stimulant and mild narcotic, the salespeople once were only men, sometimes wearing old-style robes, more often in shabby Western dress. But these days, women in bright-colored scarves are elbowing their male compatriots aside for the attention of the throng of customers. It is one of many signs around town of the changed role for women in the wake of two years of civil war here.
NEWS
December 30, 1992 | KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The National University of Somalia sits on a slight rise overlooking the capital, an ironic symbol of what has become of this country. What was once a center of African education is now a relic, devoured by the chaos and brutality of civil war. It has no classrooms, no students, no facilities, no laboratories, no telephones, no electricity--nothing, not even a chalkboard. Even the toilet bowls have been ripped out.
NEWS
January 11, 1993 | RAY TESSLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER; Times Staff Writer Ray Tessler, sent to Somalia along with Orange County-based Marines, recently returned from a tour of duty to the East African country
It was a fleeting scene, glimpsed in a blur from a passing truck. Miles outside of Mogadishu, on a narrow dirt lane in a hungry village, a father slowly walked beside his little son. He looked down, adoringly. The boy twisted his face upward. His legs were withered like the bony branches of a sapling. Starvation and disease had destroyed them. Painfully, he pulled himself along beside his dad, walking through the dirt on his hands and gnarled knees.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 12, 1993
The Clinton Administration's newfound emphasis on an African solution to the Somalia conflict is the right touch--and offers hope. But politics and history impose formidable barriers to success in Mogadishu. The hope is that the now-infamous warlord Mohammed Farah Aidid will be more responsive to African leaders. Aidid's recent cease-fire and stopping of attacks on U.N. peacekeepers are welcome; now he should immediately free U.S. helicopter pilot Michael J.
NEWS
January 5, 1993 | DANIEL WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At the afternoon market for qat, the leaves that Somalis chew as a stimulant and mild narcotic, the salespeople once were only men, sometimes wearing old-style robes, more often in shabby Western dress. But these days, women in bright-colored scarves are elbowing their male compatriots aside for the attention of the throng of customers. It is one of many signs around town of the changed role for women in the wake of two years of civil war here.
NEWS
December 30, 1992 | KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The National University of Somalia sits on a slight rise overlooking the capital, an ironic symbol of what has become of this country. What was once a center of African education is now a relic, devoured by the chaos and brutality of civil war. It has no classrooms, no students, no facilities, no laboratories, no telephones, no electricity--nothing, not even a chalkboard. Even the toilet bowls have been ripped out.
NEWS
December 11, 1992 | MARK FINEMAN and SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Through the anarchy, war and terror that has been Somalia for two years, there has been one other constant: Every morning, the rickety wood tables at Mogadishu's Black Sea Market were flush with little green bundles of knotty stems that are the lifeblood of many Somalis. But Thursday, for the first time anyone here can remember, the Black Sea Market's tables were bare. A nation went cold turkey. The culprit, in the eyes of most Somalis, was the U.S. Marine Corps.
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