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Somalia Economy

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NEWS
December 26, 1992 | SCOTT KRAFT and MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Bright and early each brutally hot day in Somalia, Ali Osman Hassan shows up for work in the middle of nowhere, on the rocky road that links Mogadishu with the interior. Using his hands, Hassan scoops dirt and rocks into a foot-deep pothole, sculpting a smooth, rounded top. As each vehicle approaches, he draws attention to his handiwork by spinning a rolled-up piece of cloth like a cowboy's lasso over the filled pothole.
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NEWS
August 5, 2000 | ANN M. SIMMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It has become a common sight here: barefoot stevedores, their glistening ebony faces powdered with dust and sand, staggering up from the ocean onto a sand beach that has become the main trading port of this ravaged city in the Horn of Africa. On their backs they lug 110-pound sacks of Indonesian cement, Brazilian sugar or flour from the United Arab Emirates. Others clamber atop barges to discharge crates of foreign food, electronic goods, car engine parts or generators. A fee of $1.
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NEWS
August 5, 2000 | ANN M. SIMMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It has become a common sight here: barefoot stevedores, their glistening ebony faces powdered with dust and sand, staggering up from the ocean onto a sand beach that has become the main trading port of this ravaged city in the Horn of Africa. On their backs they lug 110-pound sacks of Indonesian cement, Brazilian sugar or flour from the United Arab Emirates. Others clamber atop barges to discharge crates of foreign food, electronic goods, car engine parts or generators. A fee of $1.
NEWS
July 9, 1997 | ANN M. SIMMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mohammed Awil Mohammed watches with satisfaction as four women crouch on the sandy ground outside his shop in the musty heat of the dawn here, pulling the husk from frankincense with their fingers and teeth. Each worker, her lips ringed with white powder from her labors, will clean and sort at least 35 pounds of the clumps of aromatic gum before her day ends at 11 p.m.
NEWS
March 19, 1994 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The first sign of real hope for this nation's war-ruined economy arrived in a heavily armed van at the Hotel Sahafi last week wearing an Australian bush hat and a pocketful of promise: Greg Clutton was here to buy bananas--millions of them.
NEWS
March 3, 1993 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lost in the shadow of a Gargantuan U.S. Navy vessel loading helicopters, tanks and trucks bound for home at the south pier of Mogadishu Port, scores of sweating Somali stevedores tossed 100-pound sacks of chilies and sugar off the Al Mannal, a weather-beaten dhow, while another group loaded it with hay.
NEWS
July 9, 1997 | ANN M. SIMMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mohammed Awil Mohammed watches with satisfaction as four women crouch on the sandy ground outside his shop in the musty heat of the dawn here, pulling the husk from frankincense with their fingers and teeth. Each worker, her lips ringed with white powder from her labors, will clean and sort at least 35 pounds of the clumps of aromatic gum before her day ends at 11 p.m.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 12, 1993
Your article on Somalia's ruined schools (Dec. 30) is very informative and painted an accurate picture of the magnitude of the wreckage that the 2-year-old civil war brought. I am not certain, however, whether this civil war is caused by the "dispute between nomads and farmers," or a power struggle between different nomadic clans, which is what all the protagonists belong to. In fact, Somalia's civil war is a war of nomadic clans in an agricultural territory. It is, therefore, the farmers who are most affected by the famine.
NEWS
December 13, 1992 | LAURIE K. SCHENDEN, Dale Lya Pierson, UCLA Extension Community Partnerships Coordinator, spent six weeks in March, 1991, getting her husband's Somali family out of a Kenyan refugee camp. They are living with Pierson and her husband in Mid-City. They both have master's degrees in African Area Studies. She was interviewed by Laurie K. Schenden.
As the TV airwaves fill with images of international troops in Mogadishu, Somalia's capital, America gains an opportunity to learn about a country whose political problems and human suffering have too long been neglected. I know from personal experience--I struggled to bring 13 in-laws out of the Liboi refugee camp in Kenya in 1991, at a time when everyone seemed to turn a deaf ear to the need for aid in this then-forgotten corner of the world.
WORLD
May 27, 2008 | Abukar Albadri and Edmund Sanders, Special to The Times
Along the ghostly streets of Mogadishu, just about the only traffic nowadays consists of starving cats and goats searching for food. They race toward the occasional pedestrian, crying for scraps. Their owners fled the city's violence long ago, leaving more than half of Somalia's capital deserted. Shops are closed. Burned-out cars sit abandoned by the side of the road.
NEWS
March 19, 1994 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The first sign of real hope for this nation's war-ruined economy arrived in a heavily armed van at the Hotel Sahafi last week wearing an Australian bush hat and a pocketful of promise: Greg Clutton was here to buy bananas--millions of them.
NEWS
March 3, 1993 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lost in the shadow of a Gargantuan U.S. Navy vessel loading helicopters, tanks and trucks bound for home at the south pier of Mogadishu Port, scores of sweating Somali stevedores tossed 100-pound sacks of chilies and sugar off the Al Mannal, a weather-beaten dhow, while another group loaded it with hay.
NEWS
December 26, 1992 | SCOTT KRAFT and MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Bright and early each brutally hot day in Somalia, Ali Osman Hassan shows up for work in the middle of nowhere, on the rocky road that links Mogadishu with the interior. Using his hands, Hassan scoops dirt and rocks into a foot-deep pothole, sculpting a smooth, rounded top. As each vehicle approaches, he draws attention to his handiwork by spinning a rolled-up piece of cloth like a cowboy's lasso over the filled pothole.
MAGAZINE
April 4, 1993 | SCOTT KRAFT, Scott Kraft, the Times' Johannesburg bureau chief, won this year's Sigma Delta Chi award for foreign correspondence for a story on AIDS in Africa, which appeared in this magazine
THE WHITE-ROBED SURGEON, AWEYS ABDI OMAR, hands covered in blood, was cutting into the abdomen of a Somali man in Mogadishu's Digfer Hospital when half a dozen armed men burst into the operating room, carrying a moaning figure in their arms. "Doctor, you have to leave that one," they said, pointing to the anesthetized patient on the table. "Our brother has been shot." "But this patient may die if I leave," Omar protested. "Your brother is not hurt badly. He will have to wait."
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