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NEWS
June 13, 1995 | From Reuters
Gen. Mohammed Farah Aidid, who humiliated U.S. forces in Mogadishu, has been ousted as chairman of his faction by his former right-hand man, who wants the United Nations and aid agencies to return to help rebuild the nation, faction members said Monday. A vote against the 60-year-old Aidid was taken Sunday at a congress in Mogadishu of the United Somali Congress-Somali National Alliance called by his opponents within the group.
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NEWS
November 21, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
Somalia's warring factions have resumed their battles--even though southern parts of the country are underwater--jeopardizing food aid to thousands of people rendered homeless by six weeks of flooding. "These crazy people still need to fight each other, aren't even willing to stop until the crisis is over," an aid worker said. Fighting has flared again in Baidoa, center of the region hardest-hit by floods that killed 2,000 people and drove 200,000 others from their homes.
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NEWS
November 19, 1997 | From Times Wire Services
Hundreds of thousands of people stranded by devastating floods in southern Somalia will go hungry--and some may die--unless nations chip in several million dollars immediately for emergency relief, aid workers said Tuesday. They estimated that 2,000 people have drowned since the flooding began in the East African nation last month. Tens of thousands more are marooned on small patches of high land that are inaccessible by road or airplane.
NEWS
November 19, 1997 | From Times Wire Services
Hundreds of thousands of people stranded by devastating floods in southern Somalia will go hungry--and some may die--unless nations chip in several million dollars immediately for emergency relief, aid workers said Tuesday. They estimated that 2,000 people have drowned since the flooding began in the East African nation last month. Tens of thousands more are marooned on small patches of high land that are inaccessible by road or airplane.
NEWS
November 21, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
Somalia's warring factions have resumed their battles--even though southern parts of the country are underwater--jeopardizing food aid to thousands of people rendered homeless by six weeks of flooding. "These crazy people still need to fight each other, aren't even willing to stop until the crisis is over," an aid worker said. Fighting has flared again in Baidoa, center of the region hardest-hit by floods that killed 2,000 people and drove 200,000 others from their homes.
NEWS
August 13, 1992 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.N. officials said Wednesday they have reached a "momentous" agreement with a key Somali warlord allowing the deployment of up to 500 armed foreign troops to protect relief shipments coming into the port of Mogadishu. Plagued by violence and looting, the port is a troublesome bottleneck for emergency food and medical supplies for Somalia's more than 6 million people, as many as 1.5 million of whom face famine after years of civil war and drought. The agreement with Gen.
NEWS
August 7, 1992 | From Reuters
A United Nations team arrived in the ruined Somali capital Thursday to cheers from crowds of gun-toting teen-agers lining the streets as the U.N. convoy raced to meetings with rival warlords. "They think the U.N. is bringing its army to bring peace to the city," a Somali escorting the team told reporters. Peter Hansen of Denmark and his 23-member team met with self-styled President Ali Mahdi Mohamed, whose vicious feud with Gen. Mohamed Farah Aidid has killed and maimed thousands.
NEWS
January 19, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Rebels in devastated Somalia appealed for the world not to let their need for food, medical aid and other assistance be forgotten in the concern over the Persian Gulf War. Thousands would die in that event, the Somali National Movement said in a radio broadcast monitored in Nairobi, Kenya.
NEWS
August 29, 1992 | Times Wire Services
Food deliveries to Somalia: U.S.: 34.5 metric tons of beans, rice, wheat and cooking oil to Belet Huen, in western Somalia, from the Kenyan port of Mombasa, using four C-130 cargo planes. GERMANY: 20 metric tons of food, mostly grains, to Mogadishu, Somalia's capital, from Mombasa, in two Transall cargo planes.
NEWS
July 10, 1992 | Associated Press
The Red Cross said Thursday that the plight faced by Somalia's people is more desperate now than before the cease-fire and urged increased international aid to the country. Peter G. Stocker, head of the Red Cross delegation in the Horn of Africa nation, said "a dramatic and worsening situation is being faced by the people of Somalia day after day."
NEWS
June 13, 1995 | From Reuters
Gen. Mohammed Farah Aidid, who humiliated U.S. forces in Mogadishu, has been ousted as chairman of his faction by his former right-hand man, who wants the United Nations and aid agencies to return to help rebuild the nation, faction members said Monday. A vote against the 60-year-old Aidid was taken Sunday at a congress in Mogadishu of the United Somali Congress-Somali National Alliance called by his opponents within the group.
NEWS
March 4, 1994 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.S. intervention in Somalia, once heralded as a sequel to the Persian Gulf War against Iraq in shaping the new world order, may turn out instead to be the exception rather than a precedent for U.S. policy in the post-Cold War world. In a low-key, anticlimactic end to the lifesaving drama launched by President George Bush 14 months ago under the glare of television lights, the United States on Tuesday began the final month of withdrawing its troops.
NEWS
September 3, 1992 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At what passes for a hospital in this once-proud town there are 10 beds in the main ward, occupied Wednesday by 45 patients. One of them, a farmer named Yusuf Sheikh Husein, lay prostrate, his muscles wasted to nothingness from months of starvation. A doctor leaned over and roughly pinched the skin between the man's ribs. It came away like a thin leaf of paper. "You see?" the doctor said. "There is nothing left of him."
NEWS
September 2, 1992 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Much of the U.S. food aid going to famine-ravaged Somalia consists of corn and sorghum, grains chosen because they are less likely to be stolen by roving bands of armed thugs since Somalis don't much like them, President Bush's aid coordinator said Tuesday.
NEWS
August 29, 1992 | Times Wire Services
Food deliveries to Somalia: U.S.: 34.5 metric tons of beans, rice, wheat and cooking oil to Belet Huen, in western Somalia, from the Kenyan port of Mombasa, using four C-130 cargo planes. GERMANY: 20 metric tons of food, mostly grains, to Mogadishu, Somalia's capital, from Mombasa, in two Transall cargo planes.
NEWS
August 16, 1992 | From Associated Press
The United Nations and the United States widened their relief operation in Somalia on Saturday with an airlift to the nation's interior, where millions are threatened with starvation. The plane carried nearly 19 tons of high-protein biscuits to Baidoa, a town northwest of Mogadishu where aid workers estimate 500 to 700 people die daily. The airlift marked the start of a huge U.N.
NEWS
September 2, 1992 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Much of the U.S. food aid going to famine-ravaged Somalia consists of corn and sorghum, grains chosen because they are less likely to be stolen by roving bands of armed thugs since Somalis don't much like them, President Bush's aid coordinator said Tuesday.
NEWS
August 16, 1992 | From Associated Press
The United Nations and the United States widened their relief operation in Somalia on Saturday with an airlift to the nation's interior, where millions are threatened with starvation. The plane carried nearly 19 tons of high-protein biscuits to Baidoa, a town northwest of Mogadishu where aid workers estimate 500 to 700 people die daily. The airlift marked the start of a huge U.N.
NEWS
August 13, 1992 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.N. officials said Wednesday they have reached a "momentous" agreement with a key Somali warlord allowing the deployment of up to 500 armed foreign troops to protect relief shipments coming into the port of Mogadishu. Plagued by violence and looting, the port is a troublesome bottleneck for emergency food and medical supplies for Somalia's more than 6 million people, as many as 1.5 million of whom face famine after years of civil war and drought. The agreement with Gen.
NEWS
August 7, 1992 | From Reuters
A United Nations team arrived in the ruined Somali capital Thursday to cheers from crowds of gun-toting teen-agers lining the streets as the U.N. convoy raced to meetings with rival warlords. "They think the U.N. is bringing its army to bring peace to the city," a Somali escorting the team told reporters. Peter Hansen of Denmark and his 23-member team met with self-styled President Ali Mahdi Mohamed, whose vicious feud with Gen. Mohamed Farah Aidid has killed and maimed thousands.
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