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WORLD
June 26, 2009 | Paul Richter
The Obama administration has begun sending arms aid to the beleaguered government of Somalia, officials said Thursday, in an escalation of its commitment to one of the world's most troubled states. State Department officials said the support was intended to help sustain a transitional government that is steadily losing ground to Islamic militants in fighting that has been catastrophic for civilians.
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WORLD
August 20, 2012 | By Lutfi Sheriff Mohammed and Robyn Dixon, Los Angeles Times
MOGADISHU, Somalia - Somalia's new parliament was sworn in and convened for the first time Monday, but a scheduled presidential vote was not held. No firm date has been given for the vote, which could be delayed days or weeks. The changeover came as the mandate for Somalia's unpopular United Nations-backed transitional government expired, a moment Somalis hope will lead to peace and stability after more than two decades of lawlessness and violence. Once parliament has elected a speaker, a process expected to take a few days, legislators are to vote in a new president.
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NEWS
June 13, 1995 | From Reuters
Gen. Mohammed Farah Aidid, who humiliated U.S. forces in Mogadishu, has been ousted as chairman of his faction by his former right-hand man, who wants the United Nations and aid agencies to return to help rebuild the nation, faction members said Monday. A vote against the 60-year-old Aidid was taken Sunday at a congress in Mogadishu of the United Somali Congress-Somali National Alliance called by his opponents within the group.
WORLD
August 6, 2011 | By Jeffrey Fleishman and Lutfi Sheriff Mohammed
The Shabab militant Islamic group retreated early Saturday from war-battered Mogadishu, leaving residents to awaken to hushed streets as the government claimed victory against extremist forces that had tormented the Somali capital for years. It was not clear whether the move signaled a lasting withdrawal by the Al Qaeda-linked group or was a tactical shift in preparation for a counterattack. The rebels have been pounded in recent months by 9,000 government-backed African Union soldiers and U.S. drone strikes that have targeted Shabab commanders.
NEWS
January 1, 1991 | From Reuters
Heavy fighting was reported in Somalia's capital, Mogadishu, between government and rebel forces Monday, and Italian Radio said that hundreds had been killed. An Italian diplomat in Somalia said President Mohamed Siad Barre was in a bunker near the airport, directing operations against rebels who had captured part of the city earlier in the day. The diplomat, embassy counselor Claudio Pacifico, said, "The president is at his command post together with the government and is leading operations."
NEWS
December 3, 1992 | DOYLE McMANUS and ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Bush Administration is moving toward agreement on a plan to place Somalia under transitional rule by the United Nations--similar to what is being done in Cambodia--after proposed military operations are over, officials said Wednesday. Although the White House has made no decisions, officials said there is a growing belief in the State Department and National Security Council that the step will be necessary to allow U.S. troops to pull out quickly once the area is secure.
NEWS
June 9, 1988
U.S. and other foreign aid workers evacuated from northern Somalia arrived in Kenya, saying they had seen fierce rebel attacks and executions by government firing squads. The 40 foreigners, including eight Americans, flew into Nairobi after the Somali government told them to return to their posts in the field or leave the East African country. Jean Metenier, a 28-year-old French technician, said he saw 21 people executed by a government firing squad in the northern city of Hargeisa.
NEWS
February 2, 1991 | Associated Press
Somalia's new leader said he plans to hold talks later this month with all Somali groups that opposed ousted President Mohamed Siad Barre or fought to end his 22-year rule. President Ali Mahdi Mohamed said the meetings will be held to discuss the future of the Horn of Africa nation, where rebel leaders claim about 4,000 people were killed in the monthlong insurgency.
NEWS
January 5, 1991 | From Associated Press
Gunmen captured the Red Cross office in Somalia's capital Friday, apparently taking its staff hostage, and fighting intensified in the rebels' bloody attempt to drive Somalia's president from power. Rebels claimed to have massed 10,000 reinforcements in the seaside capital of Mogadishu for a final offensive to end President Mohamed Siad Barre's 21-year rule. About 500 people have been killed in fighting this week, and foreigners and Somalis have been trying to flee the East African nation.
NEWS
February 3, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Somalia's interim President Ali Mahdi Mohamed approved a caretaker Cabinet, a week after rebels overran the capital of Mogadishu and ended the 21-year rule of President Mohamed Siad Barre. State radio named 10 ministers in the Cabinet, which it said was submitted to Mahdi by interim Prime Minister Umar Arteh Ghalib.
WORLD
July 24, 2009 | Associated Press
Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon called on all countries Thursday to provide urgent military support to Somalia's beleaguered transitional government, warning that its survival is at stake. Two allied Islamist insurgent groups -- Shabab and the Islamic Party -- launched an offensive after the return of an exiled insurgent leader in April that has killed hundreds of Somalis and forced tens of thousands to flee their homes.
WORLD
June 26, 2009 | Paul Richter
The Obama administration has begun sending arms aid to the beleaguered government of Somalia, officials said Thursday, in an escalation of its commitment to one of the world's most troubled states. State Department officials said the support was intended to help sustain a transitional government that is steadily losing ground to Islamic militants in fighting that has been catastrophic for civilians.
WORLD
April 15, 2009 | Edmund Sanders
With foreign warships looming off its shores and a worldwide debate raging over how to defeat piracy, leaders in this seaside Somali capital say there's a solution that could be fast, simple and relatively cheap: the Somalis themselves.
WORLD
December 31, 2006 | Edmund Sanders, Times Staff Writer
Leaders from Somalia's capital gathered Saturday where matters of importance are often debated and settled here: under the shade of a thorny aqab tree. This one was at a bombed-out military barracks on the edge of Mogadishu, chosen because the guest of honor, President Abdullahi Yusuf, refuses to enter a notoriously dangerous city that until last week had been under the control of an Islamist alliance. "I will come to Mogadishu once everything is in place," he said.
WORLD
December 30, 2006 | Edmund Sanders and Abukar Albadri, Special to The Times
A day after the fall of Mogadishu, Somalia's transitional prime minister made a symbolic visit Friday to the tense capital, where he was met with a mix of cheers and jeers. In one part of the city, thousands of supporters waved flowers and leaves at his passing convoy; in another, rioters threw stones and burned tires in protest.
NEWS
June 29, 2001
The failure of the XFL football league delivered a hit to World Wrestling Federation Entertainment Inc., which posted a fourth-quarter net loss of $20.4 million and full-year profit that was a third of what it was a year ago. WWF's quarterly loss was 28 cents per share, compared with pro forma profit of $9.5 million, or 14 cents, for the year earlier quarter. Analysts surveyed by First Call had expected a quarterly loss of 2 cents per share. . . . Walt Disney Co. has named John H. Davison as president and general manager of its four ABC radio stations in Los Angeles: KLOS-FM, KABC-AM, KDIS-AM and KSPN-AM.
NEWS
June 29, 2001 | From Associated Press
Somalia's new police battled factional militiamen opposed to the nation's transitional government, leaving five people dead Thursday, the force's second day on the job. More than 20 people, most of them civilians, were wounded in the fighting in south Mogadishu between faction leader Hussein Mohammed Aidid's militia and the government's police force, witnesses said.
NEWS
August 5, 2000 | ANN M. SIMMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It has become a common sight here: barefoot stevedores, their glistening ebony faces powdered with dust and sand, staggering up from the ocean onto a sand beach that has become the main trading port of this ravaged city in the Horn of Africa. On their backs they lug 110-pound sacks of Indonesian cement, Brazilian sugar or flour from the United Arab Emirates. Others clamber atop barges to discharge crates of foreign food, electronic goods, car engine parts or generators. A fee of $1.
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