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NEWS
November 26, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Cholera has killed as many as 25 people in southern Somalia in two days, and health officials in Mogadishu, the capital, said they fear that the waterborne disease could spread. The officials said more than 80 people have been hospitalized in Adaleh, about 140 miles northeast of the capital, and in six surrounding villages. Health authorities expressed concern over the intensity of the disease and the large area that appears to be affected.
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NEWS
November 26, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Cholera has killed as many as 25 people in southern Somalia in two days, and health officials in Mogadishu, the capital, said they fear that the waterborne disease could spread. The officials said more than 80 people have been hospitalized in Adaleh, about 140 miles northeast of the capital, and in six surrounding villages. Health authorities expressed concern over the intensity of the disease and the large area that appears to be affected.
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NEWS
December 29, 1997 | From Associated Press
An unexplained disease that has caused scores of Kenyans, Somalis and livestock to bleed to death this month may be a form of anthrax, medical experts said Sunday. "At the moment, the evidence that we have agrees the most with an outbreak of anthrax," said Dr. Douglas Klaucke, acting World Health Organization representative in Kenya.
NEWS
April 25, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
A cholera epidemic in drought-hit southern Somalia has killed hundreds of people, including at least 80 in the last three days, health officials said. They said 50 people had died in and around the towns of Dinsor and Qansahdhere in the Bay region. Nearly 400 deaths had been recorded in the area in the last two weeks. In nearby Bardera, 30 people have died in the last three days, district commissioner Mohamud Abdi Takuul said. Officials said many more people might have died in remote villages.
NEWS
April 25, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
A cholera epidemic in drought-hit southern Somalia has killed hundreds of people, including at least 80 in the last three days, health officials said. They said 50 people had died in and around the towns of Dinsor and Qansahdhere in the Bay region. Nearly 400 deaths had been recorded in the area in the last two weeks. In nearby Bardera, 30 people have died in the last three days, district commissioner Mohamud Abdi Takuul said. Officials said many more people might have died in remote villages.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 14, 1992 | LESLIE BERKMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A tough lesson learned in the early days of the Persian Gulf War--not about tactics or weapons but about lettuce and other vegetables--may save the troops in Somalia considerable misery. The lesson occurred when some field commanders, taking pity on troops eating bland, prepackaged rations, accepted fresh vegetables bought in Egypt and other nearby countries. The result: Each week thousands of troops reported to sick call with diarrhea. This time, Lt.
NEWS
December 25, 1992 | RAY TESSLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The shrunken peanut of a boy with the haunting big eyes stared vacantly while the mother who had somehow saved him from starvation and bullets for a year gently cradled him in her lap. Although he is eating now in this hot, overcrowded refugee village 20 miles outside of Baidoa, chronic malnutrition has left the 2-year-old child with the frail, tiny-boned body of a 6-month-old baby.
WORLD
September 13, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
Thousands of children face starvation as violence continues around southern Somalia, the health minister and UNICEF said. Health Minister Isse Weheliye said that "thousands of children are on the verge of death." UNICEF said a recent malnutrition survey showed that 83,000 children in central and southern Somalia were suffering from malnutrition -- 13,500 of whom were at risk of starvation.
NEWS
January 28, 1993 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The anesthesiologist had no electronic gear to monitor the heartbeat of the patient splayed on the operating table, so he kept his index fingers tightly hooked under the man's chin to feel his pulse. The 35-year-old Somali's colon had been shattered by a bullet. One hour into an operation to rebuild it, the surgeon, Dr. Omar Nur Abdi, complained that he had no proper thread to sew up the incision in the unconscious man's left side.
NEWS
January 19, 1993 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At an intersection in a besieged neighborhood known as the Bermuda Triangle, Marines with M-16s scanned the rooftops for snipers Monday while Navy Lt. Mark Roback stood on a flatbed truck and peered deep into the open mouth of Howa Mohamed. "It's completely bombed out," Roback said, shaking his head. "There's decay all the way through. We'll have to take that tooth out."
NEWS
December 29, 1997 | From Associated Press
An unexplained disease that has caused scores of Kenyans, Somalis and livestock to bleed to death this month may be a form of anthrax, medical experts said Sunday. "At the moment, the evidence that we have agrees the most with an outbreak of anthrax," said Dr. Douglas Klaucke, acting World Health Organization representative in Kenya.
NEWS
December 25, 1992 | RAY TESSLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The shrunken peanut of a boy with the haunting big eyes stared vacantly while the mother who had somehow saved him from starvation and bullets for a year gently cradled him in her lap. Although he is eating now in this hot, overcrowded refugee village 20 miles outside of Baidoa, chronic malnutrition has left the 2-year-old child with the frail, tiny-boned body of a 6-month-old baby.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 14, 1992 | LESLIE BERKMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A tough lesson learned in the early days of the Persian Gulf War--not about tactics or weapons but about lettuce and other vegetables--may save the troops in Somalia considerable misery. The lesson occurred when some field commanders, taking pity on troops eating bland, prepackaged rations, accepted fresh vegetables bought in Egypt and other nearby countries. The result: Each week thousands of troops reported to sick call with diarrhea. This time, Lt.
WORLD
September 26, 2007 | Edmund Sanders, Times Staff Writer
Five months old and weighing less than 10 pounds, Shukri Mohammed stretched her tiny mouth to make a giant scream Tuesday when a health worker measured her limp arm for malnutrition. But scarcely a sound escaped from the baby's throat, and she sank back exhausted into her mother's arms. It's been a struggle since the day Shukri was born. The next morning, her mother walked three days to escape shelling in Mogadishu that had recently killed her husband.
NEWS
October 30, 1994 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rep. Richard H. Lehman, a conservative Democrat from the San Joaquin Valley, admires President Clinton and thinks he is doing some good things for America. But the only reference to Clinton in Lehman's television commercials as he fights for reelection is not one likely to get him invited to the White House for dinner.
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