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Somalia Military Assaults

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NEWS
December 19, 1996 | Times Wire Services
Artillery and explosions rocked the Somali capital for the sixth day Wednesday, despite an appeal by Muslim authorities for an end to "blind shelling" by all sides. Eight people were killed and 15 wounded in fighting in southern Mogadishu between forces loyal to faction leader Hussein Mohammed Aidid and those of his rivals, Osman Hassan Ali and Musa Sudi Yalahow. At least 107 people have died and 900 have been wounded since Friday in the worst fighting in a year.
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NEWS
December 19, 1996 | Times Wire Services
Artillery and explosions rocked the Somali capital for the sixth day Wednesday, despite an appeal by Muslim authorities for an end to "blind shelling" by all sides. Eight people were killed and 15 wounded in fighting in southern Mogadishu between forces loyal to faction leader Hussein Mohammed Aidid and those of his rivals, Osman Hassan Ali and Musa Sudi Yalahow. At least 107 people have died and 900 have been wounded since Friday in the worst fighting in a year.
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NEWS
May 14, 1995 | Associated Press
A mortar shell hit a school in southern Mogadishu on Saturday, killing nine students and injuring 18. A teacher lost both legs, said a doctor at Benadir Hospital, where the injured children were treated. It was not immediately possible to determine who fired the lone shell in the Bermuda neighborhood. There has been no fighting in the neighborhood since the Abgal and Murosade sub-clans fought a week ago.
NEWS
December 18, 1996 | From Associated Press
Militia fighters loyal to faction leader Ali Mahdi Mohamed bombarded his rival's palace Tuesday in the fifth day of fighting in Mogadishu. Thirteen people were killed and 23 wounded, hospital sources said. Ali Mahdi's fighters--one of several groups battling for control of the lawless capital--used pickup trucks with mounted weapons to attack Hussein Mohammed Aidid's troops at the airport and other positions in the southern part of the city.
NEWS
July 8, 1993 | From Associated Press
As many as six Somali employees of the United Nations were slain Wednesday in an ambush in Mogadishu, and the U.N. envoy to Somalia promised that peacekeepers will hunt the gunmen down. Two of the Somalis were dragged from their car and shot to death in a busy street market in Mogadishu. Four others wounded in the attack were abducted and presumed dead, said the envoy, retired U.S. Adm. Jonathan Howe. Howe described the ambush as an act of deliberate terrorism against U.
NEWS
July 4, 1993 | From Reuters
A gun battle erupted near Mogadishu airport Saturday night hours after a visiting U.S. envoy said U.N. peacekeepers were restoring order to the battered city. U.N. troops and Somali gunmen traded fire close to the airport run by the peacekeeping force and the roundabout in south Mogadishu where it is headquartered, residents said. The exchange lasted about 10 minutes. Rocket-propelled grenades were launched, presumably by gunmen attempting to hit U.N. positions, the residents said. The U.N.
NEWS
December 18, 1996 | From Associated Press
Militia fighters loyal to faction leader Ali Mahdi Mohamed bombarded his rival's palace Tuesday in the fifth day of fighting in Mogadishu. Thirteen people were killed and 23 wounded, hospital sources said. Ali Mahdi's fighters--one of several groups battling for control of the lawless capital--used pickup trucks with mounted weapons to attack Hussein Mohammed Aidid's troops at the airport and other positions in the southern part of the city.
NEWS
June 13, 1993 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.N. raids in Somalia represent a quantum leap for international peacekeeping, redefining the rules of engagement and intervention in ways that could set precedents for future operations in areas far beyond the troubled Horn of Africa. The offensive strikes against warlord Mohammed Farah Aidid and his militia contrast sharply with other peacekeeping operations in which U.N. "blue helmets," outnumbered and outgunned by local forces, merely monitor rather than keep the peace.
NEWS
June 13, 1993 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.N. forces launched a second overnight attack on Somali warlord Mohammed Farah Aidid early today after an earlier air and ground assault that destroyed most of Aidid's arsenal and demonstrated the United Nations' ability to back its mandates with military force. Explosions rocked the capital, Mogadishu, beginning about 12:45 a.m. local time (2:45 p.m. PDT) and lasting about 20 minutes, the Associated Press reported.
NEWS
February 23, 1993 | Associated Press
U.S. troops Monday postponed a pullout from Kismayu after at least seven Somalis were killed in fighting in the southern city and an Irish nurse was shot to death in an ambush on a relief convoy. The violence came on the day Gen. Cevik Bir of Turkey arrived to prepare to assume command of the U.S.-led military coalition that has secured Somalia since December, allowing relief shipments to reach starving millions. The United Nations is expected to take control of the operation within two months.
NEWS
May 14, 1995 | Associated Press
A mortar shell hit a school in southern Mogadishu on Saturday, killing nine students and injuring 18. A teacher lost both legs, said a doctor at Benadir Hospital, where the injured children were treated. It was not immediately possible to determine who fired the lone shell in the Bermuda neighborhood. There has been no fighting in the neighborhood since the Abgal and Murosade sub-clans fought a week ago.
NEWS
August 23, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Seven Indian soldiers were killed in an ambush in a village controlled by warlord Gen. Mohammed Farah Aidid, officials said in the capital, Mogadishu. Nine other Indians, also in Somalia as peacekeepers for the United Nations, were wounded in the convoy ambush 70 miles southwest of the capital. Attacks on U.N. troops have been increasing. U.N.
NEWS
July 25, 1993 | From Associated Press
Gun men ambushed American military vehicles Saturday, wounding two U.S. servicemen in the latest attack on U.N. personnel. Two Somalis were killed in the return fire. The gunmen fired on two Humvee all-purpose vehicles as the peacekeepers were returning from the airport to U.N. headquarters, said Capt. Jonathan Dahms, a U.N. spokesman. Other soldiers in the attacked vehicles shot back, killing the two Somalis. Three or four other gunmen apparently escaped, Dahms said.
NEWS
July 13, 1993 | From Associated Press
The mother of a British photographer killed by a mob in Somalia paid tribute to her son as a "very bright light which shone for a short time." "He was an inspirational person. He was amazing. He was bright, he was funny, he was musical, and he was very brave and handsome." Her free-lance photographer son, Dan Eldon, was one of two news photographers killed in an attack Monday in the Somali capital, Mogadishu. Eldon, who held dual British-U.S.
NEWS
July 8, 1993 | From Associated Press
As many as six Somali employees of the United Nations were slain Wednesday in an ambush in Mogadishu, and the U.N. envoy to Somalia promised that peacekeepers will hunt the gunmen down. Two of the Somalis were dragged from their car and shot to death in a busy street market in Mogadishu. Four others wounded in the attack were abducted and presumed dead, said the envoy, retired U.S. Adm. Jonathan Howe. Howe described the ambush as an act of deliberate terrorism against U.
NEWS
July 4, 1993 | From Reuters
A gun battle erupted near Mogadishu airport Saturday night hours after a visiting U.S. envoy said U.N. peacekeepers were restoring order to the battered city. U.N. troops and Somali gunmen traded fire close to the airport run by the peacekeeping force and the roundabout in south Mogadishu where it is headquartered, residents said. The exchange lasted about 10 minutes. Rocket-propelled grenades were launched, presumably by gunmen attempting to hit U.N. positions, the residents said. The U.N.
NEWS
July 3, 1993 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Militiamen loyal to fugitive Somali warlord Mohammed Farah Aidid launched another attack against U.N. peacekeeping troops in Mogadishu, killing three Italian paratroopers and wounding 22 while injuring four Somali policemen, officials said here Friday. The Italians were ambushed after they had completed a search operation in a suspected weapons storehouse. Italian tanks and U.S.
NEWS
June 12, 1993 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.N. forces in Somalia, including 1,200 American soldiers and heavily armed AC-130H gunships, attacked strongholds of Somali clan leader Mohammed Farah Aidid early today in Mogadishu in retaliation for the ambush last weekend of 23 Pakistani peacekeeping troops. The U.N. attack, coordinated by the United States, concentrated on blowing up four weapons compounds and warehouses belonging to Aidid and taking over a radio station he had been using as a command center, the Pentagon said.
NEWS
July 3, 1993 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Militiamen loyal to fugitive Somali warlord Mohammed Farah Aidid launched another attack against U.N. peacekeeping troops in Mogadishu, killing three Italian paratroopers and wounding 22 while injuring four Somali policemen, officials said here Friday. The Italians were ambushed after they had completed a search operation in a suspected weapons storehouse. Italian tanks and U.S.
NEWS
June 26, 1993 | From a Times Staff Writer
A U.S.-owned ocean tanker assigned to support the U.N. peacekeeping mission in Somalia was hit by a shell in Mogadishu harbor Friday in what U.S. officials said was the first such attack on an allied supply ship since the humanitarian relief effort there began last December. The U.S. Military Sealift Command said that the shell, which struck the 661-foot vessel about 12 feet below the main deck, may have been a rocket-launched grenade. Officials said they had no idea who fired the projectile.
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