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Somalia Military Confrontations

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NEWS
June 8, 1993 | From Associated Press
Machine-gun battles between U.N. troops and Somali gunmen broke out here early today, several hours after Pakistani troops reportedly killed two Somalis in clashes. The after-midnight exchanges lasted about 30 minutes. It was the first such fighting in the city since Saturday, when clashes killed at least 23 Pakistani peacekeeping troops. Five Pakistani soldiers were released to the United Nations on Monday after being captured by Somalis during Saturday's fighting.
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NEWS
April 20, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
Rival militias battled with mortars and automatic weapons in the streets of Mogadishu, killing at least 19 people and wounding 47. The fighting erupted early between fighters of Gen. Mohammed Farah Aidid and those of Osman Hassan Ali, also known as "Atto." It was difficult to assess the precise number of casualties. A local journalist reported that at least 19 fighters were killed, and hospitals reported treating 47 wounded. Atto is Aidid's former financier and advisor.
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NEWS
June 6, 1993 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the worst fighting since the United Nations assumed control of Somalia from U.S. troops, up to 49 people were killed and more than 150 were injured Saturday in clashes between peacekeepers and a Somali warlord's gunmen. A U.N. general said there were reports of up to 26 Pakistani peacekeepers killed and 10 missing in the clashes in the Somali capital of Mogadishu, the Associated Press reported. "The Pakistani toll is heavy.
NEWS
October 26, 1993 | From Associated Press
Militiamen loyal to Mohammed Farah Aidid, engaged for months in a guerrilla war with U.N. forces, clashed with an old rival Monday in open clan warfare that broke an unsteady 19-month truce. U.N. officials said at least 10 Somalis were killed and 45 wounded in fierce battles around Aidid's stronghold. The final toll was expected to be higher. U.N. and American troops stayed out of the fray, mindful of the heavy casualties from an Oct. 3 battle that killed 18 Americans and about 300 Somalis. U.S.
NEWS
April 20, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
Rival militias battled with mortars and automatic weapons in the streets of Mogadishu, killing at least 19 people and wounding 47. The fighting erupted early between fighters of Gen. Mohammed Farah Aidid and those of Osman Hassan Ali, also known as "Atto." It was difficult to assess the precise number of casualties. A local journalist reported that at least 19 fighters were killed, and hospitals reported treating 47 wounded. Atto is Aidid's former financier and advisor.
NEWS
January 11, 1993 | DANIEL WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mogadishu experienced its most serious and prolonged bout of street fighting since the arrival of the U.S. Marines as clan-based factions exchanged gunfire and artillery barrages Sunday throughout most of the day. One hospital alone received six dead and about 100 wounded from a western neighborhood of the capital. Many of the wounded were women caught in the cross-fire as the return to normal life was abruptly halted by the gunfire.
NEWS
June 7, 1993 | ROBIN WRIGHT and JOSH FRIEDMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A shaken U.N. Security Council on Sunday night unanimously called for the arrest, trial and punishment of those behind the killings of 22 U.N. peacekeepers in Somalia over the weekend, one of the most devastating such attacks in the world body's history. The council also called on member countries to send more troops and heavy equipment to Somalia so that U.N. personnel there could disarm warlords who had brought widespread famine to the country before U.S.
NEWS
March 6, 1993 | Times Wire Services
Five Somalis were killed Friday in the southern Somali port of Kismayu, four of them in gun battles with Belgian troops, the U.S. military said. The fifth Somali died in renewed clan clashes in the port, the spokesman, Marine Col. Fred Peck, told reporters. He also announced that Kismayu's rival warlords, Mohamed Siad Hirsi, known as Gen. Morgan, and Omar Jess, volunteered to hand over more weapons to the U.S.-led task force today.
NEWS
January 17, 1993 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A small U.S. Army unit returning to Mogadishu surprised a band of highway robbers and, while returning fire, killed six Somalis, including one bandit and at least three of the unarmed victims of the robbery, a military spokesman said Saturday. The incident, on the main two-lane road from Mogadishu to Bela Dogle on Friday night, marked at least the second time that American forces have acknowledged killing unarmed civilians since Operation Restore Hope was launched five weeks ago.
NEWS
October 26, 1993 | From Associated Press
Militiamen loyal to Mohammed Farah Aidid, engaged for months in a guerrilla war with U.N. forces, clashed with an old rival Monday in open clan warfare that broke an unsteady 19-month truce. U.N. officials said at least 10 Somalis were killed and 45 wounded in fierce battles around Aidid's stronghold. The final toll was expected to be higher. U.N. and American troops stayed out of the fray, mindful of the heavy casualties from an Oct. 3 battle that killed 18 Americans and about 300 Somalis. U.S.
NEWS
June 8, 1993 | From Associated Press
Machine-gun battles between U.N. troops and Somali gunmen broke out here early today, several hours after Pakistani troops reportedly killed two Somalis in clashes. The after-midnight exchanges lasted about 30 minutes. It was the first such fighting in the city since Saturday, when clashes killed at least 23 Pakistani peacekeeping troops. Five Pakistani soldiers were released to the United Nations on Monday after being captured by Somalis during Saturday's fighting.
NEWS
June 7, 1993 | ROBIN WRIGHT and JOSH FRIEDMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A shaken U.N. Security Council on Sunday night unanimously called for the arrest, trial and punishment of those behind the killings of 22 U.N. peacekeepers in Somalia over the weekend, one of the most devastating such attacks in the world body's history. The council also called on member countries to send more troops and heavy equipment to Somalia so that U.N. personnel there could disarm warlords who had brought widespread famine to the country before U.S.
NEWS
June 6, 1993 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the worst fighting since the United Nations assumed control of Somalia from U.S. troops, up to 49 people were killed and more than 150 were injured Saturday in clashes between peacekeepers and a Somali warlord's gunmen. A U.N. general said there were reports of up to 26 Pakistani peacekeepers killed and 10 missing in the clashes in the Somali capital of Mogadishu, the Associated Press reported. "The Pakistani toll is heavy.
NEWS
March 6, 1993 | Times Wire Services
Five Somalis were killed Friday in the southern Somali port of Kismayu, four of them in gun battles with Belgian troops, the U.S. military said. The fifth Somali died in renewed clan clashes in the port, the spokesman, Marine Col. Fred Peck, told reporters. He also announced that Kismayu's rival warlords, Mohamed Siad Hirsi, known as Gen. Morgan, and Omar Jess, volunteered to hand over more weapons to the U.S.-led task force today.
NEWS
January 17, 1993 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A small U.S. Army unit returning to Mogadishu surprised a band of highway robbers and, while returning fire, killed six Somalis, including one bandit and at least three of the unarmed victims of the robbery, a military spokesman said Saturday. The incident, on the main two-lane road from Mogadishu to Bela Dogle on Friday night, marked at least the second time that American forces have acknowledged killing unarmed civilians since Operation Restore Hope was launched five weeks ago.
NEWS
January 11, 1993 | DANIEL WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mogadishu experienced its most serious and prolonged bout of street fighting since the arrival of the U.S. Marines as clan-based factions exchanged gunfire and artillery barrages Sunday throughout most of the day. One hospital alone received six dead and about 100 wounded from a western neighborhood of the capital. Many of the wounded were women caught in the cross-fire as the return to normal life was abruptly halted by the gunfire.
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