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NEWS
June 28, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
More than 2,000 police began patrolling Somalia's capital for the first time in 10 years as the fledgling government tried to take back the streets from militias. Officers and 45 pickup trucks fitted with heavy weapons deployed at dawn in Mogadishu, police Col. Abdi Hassan Awaleh Qeybdid said. The 1991 ouster of Maj. Gen.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 21, 2009 | Alexandra Zavis
"It's just before midnight and we just have been attacked by pirates." So began a not entirely atypical blog post by Kaye Caldwell of Hermosa Beach, who since last summer has been traveling the world with her husband and three children. The April 26 attack on their Italian cruise ship far off the coast of Somalia was but the latest installment in an adventure that has taken the family to the Australian outback, riot-torn Thailand and South African townships.
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NEWS
October 25, 1993 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On a warm afternoon last week, Abdulkadir Yahya Ali and his wife, Suad, spent several painful hours on the veranda of their newly opened "Peace Hotel," looking to the day next March when the last American soldier leaves this country. "The U.N. will collapse. Civil war will resume," concluded Yahya, a Somali intellectual, U.N. political officer and former U.S. Embassy protocol chief who gambled his life and his future on the troubled American-led U.N. mission to pacify and rebuild Somalia.
NEWS
June 28, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
More than 2,000 police began patrolling Somalia's capital for the first time in 10 years as the fledgling government tried to take back the streets from militias. Officers and 45 pickup trucks fitted with heavy weapons deployed at dawn in Mogadishu, police Col. Abdi Hassan Awaleh Qeybdid said. The 1991 ouster of Maj. Gen.
NEWS
March 28, 1993 | From Times Wire Services
Somali leaders, vowing to trade "the logic of force for the ethic of dialogue," agreed Saturday to establish an interim government to end the anarchy that has locked their country in a deadly cycle of famine and violence. After 13 days of bargaining at a U.N.-sponsored peace conference here, 15 chiefs of Somalia's warring factions reached a compromise accord to set up a three-tiered, federal-style administration to guide their country during a two-year period leading to elections.
NEWS
September 16, 1998 | ANN M. SIMMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was not so long ago that Somali entrepreneurs needing permits to conduct business had to travel hundreds of miles to the capital, Mogadishu, and then spend at least a month begging and bribing government officials to procure the proper stamps and signatures. Even making a business call sometimes required crossing into another country, as Somalia's state-controlled utility left broad swaths of territory without service.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 21, 2009 | Alexandra Zavis
"It's just before midnight and we just have been attacked by pirates." So began a not entirely atypical blog post by Kaye Caldwell of Hermosa Beach, who since last summer has been traveling the world with her husband and three children. The April 26 attack on their Italian cruise ship far off the coast of Somalia was but the latest installment in an adventure that has taken the family to the Australian outback, riot-torn Thailand and South African townships.
OPINION
December 13, 1992 | Henry A. Kissinger, Former Secretary of State Henry A. Kissinger writes frequently for The Times
Normally, one would not expect an enterprise with such potentially long-term consequences as the dispatch of U.S. combat forces to Somalia to be launched in the last five weeks of a presidency. Bill Clinton does not yet have a national-security team to help him make assessments. His entourage has been careful to note that though he is "supportive," he did not participate in the decision.
NEWS
March 3, 1995 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With U.S. Marines pouring out gunfire to safeguard a U.N. retreat, the world gave up on woebegone Somalia today. The goodby was purely military: 73 hours after landing, the last of the Marines, their machine-gun barrels still hot, rumbled across the beach and splashed their amphibious assault vehicles into the Indian Ocean, bound for home or duty stations elsewhere. Fading into the distance was the sorrowful pop of Somali gunfire, the national anthem for this disintegrated nation.
NEWS
October 12, 1993 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Just three months before he declared war on the United States and the United Nations, a kinder and gentler Mohammed Farah Aidid sat on the rooftop of his heavily armed Mogadishu compound, idly tapping the shaft of his ceremonial warlord cane and smiling faintly at the U.S. helicopter gunships that occasionally circled overhead. "The American presence in Somalia is very important, and it should be continued in a very constructive way," Aidid told a Times reporter on that quiet March afternoon.
NEWS
September 16, 1998 | ANN M. SIMMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was not so long ago that Somali entrepreneurs needing permits to conduct business had to travel hundreds of miles to the capital, Mogadishu, and then spend at least a month begging and bribing government officials to procure the proper stamps and signatures. Even making a business call sometimes required crossing into another country, as Somalia's state-controlled utility left broad swaths of territory without service.
NEWS
October 25, 1993 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On a warm afternoon last week, Abdulkadir Yahya Ali and his wife, Suad, spent several painful hours on the veranda of their newly opened "Peace Hotel," looking to the day next March when the last American soldier leaves this country. "The U.N. will collapse. Civil war will resume," concluded Yahya, a Somali intellectual, U.N. political officer and former U.S. Embassy protocol chief who gambled his life and his future on the troubled American-led U.N. mission to pacify and rebuild Somalia.
NEWS
March 28, 1993 | From Times Wire Services
Somali leaders, vowing to trade "the logic of force for the ethic of dialogue," agreed Saturday to establish an interim government to end the anarchy that has locked their country in a deadly cycle of famine and violence. After 13 days of bargaining at a U.N.-sponsored peace conference here, 15 chiefs of Somalia's warring factions reached a compromise accord to set up a three-tiered, federal-style administration to guide their country during a two-year period leading to elections.
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