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Somalia Refugees

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November 17, 1992 | Associated Press
A ship crowded with 2,500 Somali refugees limped Monday into a remote Yemeni port, where the refugees received their first food and water in several days but were forbidden to go ashore. Several hours later, the ship headed on from Mukalla to Aden, about 300 miles to the southwest, French naval officials said. U.N. workers in Aden were putting up tents and digging latrines on the beach to prepare for the refugees.
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WORLD
September 26, 2011 | By Robyn Dixon, Los Angeles Times
The barefoot Somali boy sat by an irrigation canal just beyond the camp that was his world, staring into the dirty, stagnant water. Why was his life so wretched? That day, Maulid Warfa had seen a school in a nearby town with real desks and chairs. The contrast with his refugee camp school, a bare hut with a leaking roof, seemed unbearable. "I remember sitting, thinking, 'Why? Why am I going to this school that doesn't even have chairs and doesn't even have a proper roof?
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WORLD
February 15, 2010 | By Haley Sweetland Edwards
Holding her baby above her head, Rihanna Mohammed tumbled out of a boat in rough seas and swam to the Yemeni shore. "It is a wicked, wicked journey," said the refugee from Somalia, her feet wrinkled and yellowed, her face speckled white with sand. "Waves were crashing over us the whole way. We were terrified." But she was lucky. Mohammed, her 1-year-old daughter and 48 others made it alive, fleeing the war and poverty of their native land for the uncertainties of a new one. Thousands make the journey every week in fleets of battered fishing boats sailed by smugglers.
WORLD
February 15, 2010 | By Haley Sweetland Edwards
Holding her baby above her head, Rihanna Mohammed tumbled out of a boat in rough seas and swam to the Yemeni shore. "It is a wicked, wicked journey," said the refugee from Somalia, her feet wrinkled and yellowed, her face speckled white with sand. "Waves were crashing over us the whole way. We were terrified." But she was lucky. Mohammed, her 1-year-old daughter and 48 others made it alive, fleeing the war and poverty of their native land for the uncertainties of a new one. Thousands make the journey every week in fleets of battered fishing boats sailed by smugglers.
WORLD
September 26, 2011 | By Robyn Dixon, Los Angeles Times
The barefoot Somali boy sat by an irrigation canal just beyond the camp that was his world, staring into the dirty, stagnant water. Why was his life so wretched? That day, Maulid Warfa had seen a school in a nearby town with real desks and chairs. The contrast with his refugee camp school, a bare hut with a leaking roof, seemed unbearable. "I remember sitting, thinking, 'Why? Why am I going to this school that doesn't even have chairs and doesn't even have a proper roof?
WORLD
July 8, 2009 | TIMES WIRE REPORTS
Much of Somalia's capital has become a ghost town as more than 200,000 residents have fled intensified clashes between Islamist insurgents and government troops, the U.N. and a medical charity said. Medecins Sans Frontieres announced it had been forced to close a pediatric hospital and three health clinics in the north of Mogadishu -- the first time it has done so in 17 years. The group is one of the few charities remaining in the country. The U.N. refugee agency says 204,000 Somalis have fled Mogadishu since May.
NEWS
March 7, 1993 | PAULINE JELINEK, ASSOCIATED PRESS
There is food for the hungry here, if no rest for the weary. Thousands of people who have fled Somalia are being restored to health by relief agencies at the Liboi refugee camp 9 miles from the border, but the violence from home is at their door once again. Refugees and Kenyan officials blame a recent surge of murders and looting in the camp and surrounding countryside on gunmen driven from Somalia by American and allied soldiers.
WORLD
July 8, 2009 | TIMES WIRE REPORTS
Much of Somalia's capital has become a ghost town as more than 200,000 residents have fled intensified clashes between Islamist insurgents and government troops, the U.N. and a medical charity said. Medecins Sans Frontieres announced it had been forced to close a pediatric hospital and three health clinics in the north of Mogadishu -- the first time it has done so in 17 years. The group is one of the few charities remaining in the country. The U.N. refugee agency says 204,000 Somalis have fled Mogadishu since May.
NEWS
November 17, 1992 | Associated Press
A ship crowded with 2,500 Somali refugees limped Monday into a remote Yemeni port, where the refugees received their first food and water in several days but were forbidden to go ashore. Several hours later, the ship headed on from Mukalla to Aden, about 300 miles to the southwest, French naval officials said. U.N. workers in Aden were putting up tents and digging latrines on the beach to prepare for the refugees.
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