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Somalia Relief

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September 24, 1992 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The drought had passed over Abdi Husein's farm. As recently as a year ago, he was able to grow corn, tomatoes and onions on four acres along a wadi flowing intermittently into the Juba River 150 miles from this provincial center. But then the war reached his village. The army of deposed dictator Mohamed Siad Barre was fleeing west toward the Kenya border, pursued by the warlord Gen. Mohammed Farrah Aidid, and its path was left a wasted ruin.
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NEWS
November 21, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
Somalia's warring factions have resumed their battles--even though southern parts of the country are underwater--jeopardizing food aid to thousands of people rendered homeless by six weeks of flooding. "These crazy people still need to fight each other, aren't even willing to stop until the crisis is over," an aid worker said. Fighting has flared again in Baidoa, center of the region hardest-hit by floods that killed 2,000 people and drove 200,000 others from their homes.
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NEWS
August 16, 1992 | From Associated Press
The United Nations and the United States widened their relief operation in Somalia on Saturday with an airlift to the nation's interior, where millions are threatened with starvation. The plane carried nearly 19 tons of high-protein biscuits to Baidoa, a town northwest of Mogadishu where aid workers estimate 500 to 700 people die daily. The airlift marked the start of a huge U.N.
NEWS
November 19, 1997 | From Times Wire Services
Hundreds of thousands of people stranded by devastating floods in southern Somalia will go hungry--and some may die--unless nations chip in several million dollars immediately for emergency relief, aid workers said Tuesday. They estimated that 2,000 people have drowned since the flooding began in the East African nation last month. Tens of thousands more are marooned on small patches of high land that are inaccessible by road or airplane.
NEWS
January 2, 1993 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As the sun set on the battered Somali town of Baidoa one day this week, 100 U.S. Marines gathered around Los Angeles' Cardinal Roger Mahony for an evening Mass. "You fellows should understand how this is playing back home," Mahony told the Marines, many of whom came from Oxnard, Mission Hills and other cities in the cardinal's own archdiocese. "You're helping these people. And you really should be proud of that. It's having an enormous positive impact," he said.
NEWS
October 31, 1992 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The resignation and replacement of the United Nations' chief representative in Somalia could set back by months a U.N. relief effort that is already near a standstill, say relief officials reached in the Somali capital, Mogadishu. "We're right back to where we were last May," one aid worker said. Every setback could mean hundreds more deaths every day among famine victims in the stricken country. The officials were highly critical of the Thursday replacement of U.N.
NEWS
December 4, 1992 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.N. Security Council voted unanimously Thursday to authorize an American-commanded force of mainly American troops to speed into the woeful nation of Somalia and brush aside the warlords and their young henchmen now preventing most food shipments from reaching the starving millions there.
NEWS
December 14, 1992 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an important advance that brought Operation Restore Hope closer to Somalia's starving millions, more than 600 U.S. Marine, Air Force and Army troops took over an abandoned inland airstrip here Sunday and created the first permanent base on the edge of the nation's famine zone. The troops arrived at the former Soviet base, set amid thickets of thorny acacia trees, in wave after wave of helicopters watched solemnly in flight by curious farmers and herds of camels.
NEWS
December 7, 1992 | SCOTT PETERSON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A relief convoy ended a month-old standoff with warring militias Sunday and left the capital's chaotic port to deliver food to an isolated part of the city as U.S. Marines massed offshore. The convoy of 40 trucks was the first such convoy to make it safely out of the port in more than a month--since before the port was shelled Nov. 7 and a 34-truck shipment was ambushed four days later on its way to the famine zone in the interior, with as many as 40 of its guards killed.
NEWS
September 13, 1992 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The United Nations on Saturday announced a major initiative to increase the amount of relief food, agricultural stocks and medical care in famine-stricken Somalia over the next three months. But U.N. officials, speaking here after a two-day fact-finding trip to Somalia, acknowledged that the program's success still depends on the cooperation of the country's warlords and armed gangs in permitting unimpeded movement of supplies out of the key port of Mogadishu and into the countryside.
NEWS
July 29, 1994 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton Administration, haunted by its nightmarish experience in Somalia, is trying to avoid the same political mistakes as it prepares for a massive military relief effort in Rwanda. U.S. officials said the lessons learned from the American mission in Somalia--which turned from an initial success into a textbook case of how not to run such an operation--account for much of the Administration's caution in sending troops into Kigali, Rwanda's capital.
NEWS
January 26, 1994 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Although images of stick-limbed, swollen-bellied babies no longer numb the minds of workers in Somalia, U.N. officials are troubled by hints of potential disaster as the peacekeeping force there dwindles in size and power. "It's a shaky situation, a touch-and-go situation," said Jan Eliasson, the Swedish diplomat who is departing as U.N. undersecretary general for humanitarian affairs. "What we fear is an outbreak of hostilities." In a report to the Security Council two weeks ago, U.N.
NEWS
July 9, 1993 | RICHARD A. SERRANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
About 350 U.S. Marines have landed in northern Somalia to help local officials rebuild roads and a burned-out school and orphanage as part of continuing humanitarian relief and training efforts, Pentagon officials said Thursday. The deployment, dubbed Operation Open Hand, is an extension of earlier relief efforts by the U.S. military to secure deliveries of food and supplies to starving people in war-ravaged Somalia.
NEWS
June 22, 1993 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Four Somali women sat half-buried in a pile of American wheat in a seaside neighborhood here the other day, guarded by U.N. soldiers stationed on nearby rooftops. And, for the first time in two weeks, they resumed the job of giving food to the beleaguered citizenry. "I was afraid to come today," admitted one aid recipient, Kadijo Hassan Mohamud, a 25-year-old mother of four who collected her ration of five pounds of wheat in a plastic bag. "But for food, we must trust in God.
NEWS
May 5, 1993 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The American flag was still flying outside the three U.S. Army tents marked "Black Chicken Company" at Mogadishu Airport on Tuesday, even after the U.S. command flag was lowered for the last time at the former U.S. Embassy in a brief afternoon ceremony. It was a time to take stock--the official end to what the military brass had declared a successful and unprecedented U.S.
NEWS
May 3, 1993 | PAUL HOUSTON
LOW BLOW? Shortly after a two-day trip to deliver aid to starving Somalians, heavyweight champion Riddick Bowe received a note from President Clinton, praising his "generosity and kindness." But Ambassador Robert Oakley, the special U.S. envoy to Somalia who for three months endured cramped quarters in the gutted U.S. Embassy during the military operation there, hasn't heard boo from Clinton since his return in March.
NEWS
September 23, 1992 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a major blow to the Somalia relief effort, outbreaks of looting, gun battles and bad weather have forced the indefinite suspension of most of the international airlifts flying emergency food into the country's interior, officials said Tuesday. The sharp deterioration of security over the last few days is affecting hundreds of thousands of famine victims in regional centers. They were just beginning to receive airlifted food after months of starvation.
NEWS
December 14, 1992 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Facing growing criticism for the cautious pace with which U.S. troops are moving out of the capital of Mogadishu, Lt. Gen. Robert B. Johnston, the American military commander in Somalia, pledged Sunday that his forces will get to the terrorized city of Baidoa "as soon as we can." "I can't just run 50 Marines down the road and expect that all will be well in Baidoa. . . ," Johnston said Sunday.
NEWS
April 29, 1993 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To a scratchy rendition of the national anthem and the wail of a Pakistani bagpipe brigade, the U.S. military operation to end starvation and restore hope in Somalia effectively came to an end Wednesday as the American forces turned over their last regional command to the United Nations. The official change of command to a multinational U.N. peacekeeping force that will assume responsibility for the war-ravaged nation's recovery will not take place until next Tuesday, at the earliest.
NEWS
March 14, 1993 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Three hundred strong, people whose country has vanished, they marched down a sun-blasted road one morning to the tootling of saxophones to celebrate a unique revolution in Africa, one that hasn't yet had a victor. Two years ago, Somalia's dictator, Mohamed Siad Barre, was toppled from power and then fled abroad. To mark the anniversary, a tiny part of Mogadishu's populace met at the crumbling review stand where Siad Barre used to gaze proudly on his army and listened to speeches and music.
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