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Somalia Revolts

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NEWS
January 8, 1991 | From Times Wire Services
The State Department said Monday that Somali army looters fired rocket grenades at the U.S. Embassy in the capital of Mogadishu and sacked it hours after American and other diplomats were evacuated from that nation's capital. "Certainly there is no doubt" that the looters were soldiers in the armed forces of Somali President Mohamed Siad Barre, said a member of the department task force monitoring developments in the war-torn African nation.
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NEWS
December 30, 2001 | From Reuters
Heavy fighting that broke out in Somalia's capital has killed nine people, including three civilians caught in cross-fire as police battled heavily armed militias, authorities said. The fighting late Friday pitted militiamen loyal to a businessman against the police forces of Somalia's transitional national government. Both sides used machine guns, assault rifles and rocket-propelled grenades. Frightened civilians evacuated the area near Mogadishu's animal market where the shooting took place.
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NEWS
March 7, 1994 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A U.S. Marine sniper team peered through gun sights atop the Empire State merchant ship Sunday afternoon, scanning the horizon of a city slipping deeper into chaos by the day, as 277 American soldiers flanked by the high-powered cannons of two Bradley fighting vehicles quietly marched up the gangplank. On Tuesday, another ship will dock at Mogadishu's seaport, the Greek cruise ship Mediterranean Sky. Also amid strict security, more than 500 U.S.
NEWS
December 8, 2001 | DAVAN MAHARAJ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At the Dayx livestock market here, 60- year-old Ali Omalia is performing an act seldom seen in this war-ravaged capital. He's paying taxes, the equivalent of about 50 cents, on a camel he bought to slaughter. In another era, Omalia might have been like any other grumbling taxpayer.
NEWS
March 20, 1994 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On the edge of Medina market, about a block from the perimeter of the main military compound America is leaving behind, Mahmoud Mohamed sat at a battered metal table, selling the last of the American garbage that has fed his family and tens of thousands of others for more than a year. They are the leavings of U.S. military MREs--Meals Ready to Eat.
NEWS
December 9, 1993 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Hey you! Lie down! Lie down!" the young Marine shouted, pointing an assault rifle at Ahmed Hussein Fidow's head when it popped up, ever so briefly, to welcome U.S. Marines ashore here. It was Dec. 9, 1992, which seems a lifetime ago--the opening night of a year that went so wrong. But in a little-known scene that was to foreshadow so much, the Marine's warning wasn't enough. "Welcome Marines! Welcome in Mogadishu!" Fidow persisted from his prone position.
NEWS
June 14, 1993 | ART PINE and TODD SHIELDS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Pakistani troops deployed by the United Nations opened fire on civilian demonstrators Sunday, killing at least 14 and perhaps as many as 20, hours before U.N. forces launched a third night of air strikes on the Somali capital. In the 90-minute attack early today, a U.S. AC-130H Spectre gunship joined a force targeting two vehicle storage sites controlled by Somali warlord Mohammed Farah Aidid, the Pentagon said.
NEWS
February 28, 1995 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Their fingers crossed in hopes of avoiding a repeat of bloodshed here, U.S. Marines splashed ashore in Somalia early today to conclude a misadventure that hardened America's heart to troubles in far-off corners of the globe and deepened its doubts about being the world's policeman.
NEWS
September 19, 1993 | From Times Wire Services
Two mortars struck just outside Mogadishu's largest hospital Saturday, wounding 34 Somalis, doctors said. Four mortars also hit the U.N. compound, slightly wounding an American soldier. The mortars were fired after U.S. Army Rangers raided a suspected military staging area for militiamen of fugitive warlord Mohammed Farah Aidid. U.N. military spokesman Maj. David Stockwell said the mortars that hit the sprawling U.N.
NEWS
August 9, 1993 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the largest single loss of American life since the international community went to Somalia's rescue last December, four U.S. soldiers died Sunday when gunmen ambushed a U.N. peacekeeping convoy in Mogadishu. President Clinton pledged to take "appropriate action" against those responsible. The soldiers were killed when their vehicle hit a land mine in southern Mogadishu and the convoy in which they were riding came under attack.
NEWS
July 27, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Fighting erupted among rival Somali militiamen for control of the southern port of Kismayu, and radio reports said nine people were killed and 20 wounded. Residents said gunmen loyal to warlord Gen. Mohammed Morgan of the Somali Patriotic Movement fought rivals from the Juba Valley Alliance, a clan-based grouping that helped set up a new civil administration in the city, about 310 miles south of the capital, Mogadishu.
NEWS
May 20, 2001 | ANN M. SIMMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Somalia's first central government in a decade is struggling to assert its authority, sparking fears that the country could once again disintegrate into the anarchy it witnessed in the early 1990s. There are no properly functioning ministries. With government offices in ruins, most Cabinet ministers conduct their daily business in heavily guarded homes or hotel rooms.
NEWS
March 31, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
A top faction leader freed two of four U.N. staffers he had been holding in opposition to Somalia's new government. Pierre-Paul Lamotte of Belgium and French national Mohamed Mohamedi were flown to Kenya, according to the United Nations. The remaining hostages are Britons.
NEWS
March 28, 2001 | From Times Wire Services
Militiamen ambushed an aid convoy and attacked the compound of a French humanitarian aid group Tuesday, seizing nine relief workers, Somali officials said. A U.N. spokeswoman in neighboring Kenya said early today that five of the workers had been released. Witnesses said at least eight Somalis were killed in the fighting in Mogadishu that stemmed from a feud between two groups, one of which was hired to protect the compound of the aid group Doctors Without Borders.
NEWS
January 9, 2001 | Associated Press
The speaker of Somalia's parliament appeared after two days of hiding Monday and accused neighboring Ethiopia of masterminding an attack on his entourage that left at least nine people dead and dozens injured. A delegation led by speaker Abdalla Derow Issak, which included a government minister and seven legislators, was ambushed Saturday by more than 200 anti-government gunmen 185 miles northwest of Mogadishu, the capital.
NEWS
January 8, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Somalia has dispatched dozens of heavily armed men to rescue the parliament speaker and other officials in hiding since they were ambushed about 185 miles northwest of Mogadishu, the capital, by an anti-government militia, an official said. The force will not attack the Rahanwein Resistance Army gunmen who ambushed the group, but will meet the group at a village about 40 miles east of the ambush site, the official said. Speaker Abdalla Derow Issak and the others were said to be on foot.
NEWS
January 17, 1993 | DANIEL WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A pair of young, battle-hardened men from each side of the no-man's-land in devastated downtown Mogadishu were discussing what must be one of Africa's most surreal monuments. It was a combat tank, sitting upright in shallow water off the disused old port of Mogadishu, its cannon pointing toward the city. "We stole this tank from you and drove it into the water," one of the men said with a laugh. The other contradicted him humorously but with a trace of bite in his voice.
NEWS
January 1, 1991 | From Reuters
Heavy fighting was reported in Somalia's capital, Mogadishu, between government and rebel forces Monday, and Italian Radio said that hundreds had been killed. An Italian diplomat in Somalia said President Mohamed Siad Barre was in a bunker near the airport, directing operations against rebels who had captured part of the city earlier in the day. The diplomat, embassy counselor Claudio Pacifico, said, "The president is at his command post together with the government and is leading operations."
NEWS
January 7, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Militia gunmen attacked government forces escorting Somalia's parliament speaker and other officials, killing at least nine soldiers and wounding dozens, witnesses said. The fate of the officials was unknown. More than 200 Rahanwein Resistance Army gunmen ambushed speaker Abdalla Derow Issak's entourage as it was traveling in a militia-controlled region about 185 miles northwest of the capital, Mogadishu.
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