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Somalia Security

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NEWS
December 6, 1992 | MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As more U.S. troops began to move toward Somalia, U.N. Secretary General Boutros Boutros-Ghali called on the international community Saturday to stem the shipment of arms to Africa, where he said they are responsible for tragedies like the one that has drawn the United States into a massive relief effort. "The outside world must act, urgently, to curtail the flow of arms to Africa," Boutros-Ghali told a conference on global development at former President Jimmy Carter's policy center in Atlanta.
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WORLD
July 25, 2009 | Reuters
Newly appointed Somali Security Minister Abdullahi Mohammed Ali vowed Friday to reform the security forces in the Horn of Africa nation, seen by many as riven with internal divisions. Somalia's Western-backed government is struggling to wrest control of the anarchic nation from powerful Islamist-led rebels. "I think, in wartimes, it is difficult for even a functioning government to organize its forces very effectively. We are trying to reform the police and the military," he said.
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NEWS
September 20, 1992 | Reuters
This country's fiercest warlord returned from bush battles like a conquering hero Saturday and ruled out the deployment of 3,000 U.N. troops to stop gunmen looting food for the starving. "Without our consent they cannot come and we will not agree, absolutely," declared guerrilla leader Mohammed Farrah Aidid, returning to battle-ruined Mogadishu after five months. Aidid said the 500 Pakistani troops taking positions this week, plus a local police force of 6,000, can handle security in Somalia.
NEWS
July 4, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
A United Nations plan to help Somalia's fledgling government rebuild has been put on hold because of security concerns, said David Stephen, the U.N. representative for Somalia. A draft of the plan was to have been delivered by the end of April, but the March kidnapping of four U.N. employees in Mogadishu, the capital, halted the process, Stephen said. The hostages were released unharmed by their captors, who oppose the government.
NEWS
June 20, 1993 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Early last month, when the United States formally ended its five-month-long military intervention in Somalia and turned the peacekeeping job over to the United Nations, there was widespread agreement that the mission had been successful. Relief agencies were well on their way to easing starvation among Somalis. The country's warring clan factions had been restrained. Even Mogadishu seemed secure. "It's a good feeling to have been a part of that," Marine Lt. Gen. Robert B.
NEWS
March 12, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Donor nations and relief officials opened a Somalia aid conference in the Ethiopian capital of Addis Ababa and threatened to limit funding or even pull out of Somalia unless violence is halted and peace talks progress. Three foreign aid workers have been killed in Somalia this year, and rioting and clan fighting have interrupted relief shipments. Somali representatives attending the conference demanded that the United Nations give them a stronger police force and step up weapons seizures.
NEWS
December 7, 1992 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This U.S. Navy ship, carrying enough supplies and ammunition to arm, feed and quench the thirst of 2,000 Marines during 15 days of battle, is steaming toward a midnight rendezvous tonight with a U.S. flotilla--and, soon after, the beginning of Operation Restore Hope in Somalia. Lt. Col.
NEWS
December 8, 1992 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The first large contingent of U.S. Marines scheduled for duty in famine-ravaged Somalia is to land in that country Wednesday morning in what American officials hope will be a strong enough show of force to discourage serious opposition, the Pentagon said Monday.
NEWS
August 22, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Commercial flights were barred from Mogadishu's airport after U.N. commanders learned warlord Mohammed Farah Aidid may be planning to use antiaircraft missiles. Aidid is believed to have Stinger ground-to-air missiles captured during the overthrow of former dictator Mohamed Siad Barre early in 1991. U.N. spokesman Maj. David Stockwell said the restriction will probably remain in effect until Aug. 28.
NEWS
December 9, 1990 | Associated Press
The State Department on Saturday advised all Americans to leave Somalia because of growing chaos there, and urged Americans to defer all travel to the African country until it becomes safe.
NEWS
November 5, 1994 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The international intervention in Somalia--once a prideful and altruistic mission for both the United States and the United Nations--headed toward an ignominious end Friday as the Security Council voted unanimously to withdraw all 15,000 peacekeepers there by March 31.
NEWS
January 26, 1994 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Although images of stick-limbed, swollen-bellied babies no longer numb the minds of workers in Somalia, U.N. officials are troubled by hints of potential disaster as the peacekeeping force there dwindles in size and power. "It's a shaky situation, a touch-and-go situation," said Jan Eliasson, the Swedish diplomat who is departing as U.N. undersecretary general for humanitarian affairs. "What we fear is an outbreak of hostilities." In a report to the Security Council two weeks ago, U.N.
NEWS
August 28, 1993 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Defense Secretary Les Aspin said Friday the United States plans to bring its forces home from Somalia as soon as they have re-established adequate security in the country, but he provided no firm timetable for achieving that elusive goal. In a speech before a foreign policy group, Aspin said the roughly 4,600 American military personnel now in Somalia--including 1,600 combat soldiers and 3,000 logistics troops--would stay "long enough to complete their mission and no longer."
NEWS
August 22, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Commercial flights were barred from Mogadishu's airport after U.N. commanders learned warlord Mohammed Farah Aidid may be planning to use antiaircraft missiles. Aidid is believed to have Stinger ground-to-air missiles captured during the overthrow of former dictator Mohamed Siad Barre early in 1991. U.N. spokesman Maj. David Stockwell said the restriction will probably remain in effect until Aug. 28.
NEWS
June 21, 1993 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The massive U.N. ground and air assault on a Somali warlord's neighborhood last week was originally planned as a three-day operation but was cut short after the first day, apparently because of top-level fears of a public relations backlash in the United States and Europe, a U.N. official revealed Sunday.
NEWS
June 20, 1993 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Early last month, when the United States formally ended its five-month-long military intervention in Somalia and turned the peacekeeping job over to the United Nations, there was widespread agreement that the mission had been successful. Relief agencies were well on their way to easing starvation among Somalis. The country's warring clan factions had been restrained. Even Mogadishu seemed secure. "It's a good feeling to have been a part of that," Marine Lt. Gen. Robert B.
NEWS
August 28, 1993 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Defense Secretary Les Aspin said Friday the United States plans to bring its forces home from Somalia as soon as they have re-established adequate security in the country, but he provided no firm timetable for achieving that elusive goal. In a speech before a foreign policy group, Aspin said the roughly 4,600 American military personnel now in Somalia--including 1,600 combat soldiers and 3,000 logistics troops--would stay "long enough to complete their mission and no longer."
NEWS
December 31, 1992 | KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The main U.S. Marine mission of opening and securing food distribution centers for millions of starving Somalis will be preempted for the next two days by a more immediate calling: protecting President Bush. For 41 hours starting today, Bush will stop for photo opportunities and ad-libbed remarks to Somali orphans and to the American troops stationed here at his orders. "The President won't be making any substantive or significant speeches," said a member of his staff.
NEWS
June 20, 1993 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Only three months ago, while Mohammed Farah Aidid was solemnly negotiating Somalia's future in neighboring Ethiopia, his thugs back home were trying to extort $450,000 from two relief agencies with threats that "blood would flow." Officials from one of those agencies, CARE, a U.S.-based organization, were worried that the threat would force them to close down here.
NEWS
March 12, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Donor nations and relief officials opened a Somalia aid conference in the Ethiopian capital of Addis Ababa and threatened to limit funding or even pull out of Somalia unless violence is halted and peace talks progress. Three foreign aid workers have been killed in Somalia this year, and rioting and clan fighting have interrupted relief shipments. Somali representatives attending the conference demanded that the United Nations give them a stronger police force and step up weapons seizures.
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