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NATIONAL
August 18, 2010 | By Richard A. Serrano, Tribune Washington Bureau
A federal judge in Virginia threw out piracy charges against six Somali nationals Tuesday, saying prosecutors had failed to prove that an April attack on a Navy ship off Africa was piracy "as defined by the law of nations. " But U.S. District Judge Raymond Jackson allowed the prosecution to go forward against the men on seven lesser charges. Convictions on the piracy allegations could have brought mandatory life sentences without parole. Defense attorneys had argued that their clients were not guilty of piracy because they had made no attempt to rob or board the ship.
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WORLD
February 21, 2014 | By Robyn Dixon
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- Nine militants and two Somali government officials were killed when an Al Qaeda -linked terror group attacked the presidential compound in the Somali capital, Mogadishu, on Friday. President Hassan Sheik Mohamud, whose residence and office are in the compound known as Villa Somalia, was unharmed. Two suicide bombers in two cars attacked the compound, triggering  massive explosions, before a group of seven armed gunmen opened fire, according to Somali security officials.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 18, 2013 | By Tony Perry
SAN DIEGO - Three Somali immigrants - an imam, a cabdriver and an employee of a money transmitting business - were sentenced Monday to federal prison for aiding a terrorist group in their homeland. Basaaly Saeed Moalin, 36, the cabdriver, was sentenced to 18 years. Mohamed Mohamed Mohamud, 41, the imam, was sentenced to 13 years. Issa Doreh, 56, the employee of the money transmitting business, was sentenced to 10 years. The three were convicted of a conspiracy to send money from San Diego to Somalia to help al-Shabaab, termed by the U.S. government as a terrorist group linked with Al Qaeda attempting to topple the shaky governments in Somalia, Yemen and elsewhere.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 2014 | By Lisa Rosen
Hollywood loves a Cinderella story, and few have ever fit that shoe better than Barkhad Abdi. The actor, who played Somali pirate leader Muse in the Paul Greengrass film "Captain Phillips" to great acclaim, was born in Mogadishu. He recalls an idyllic childhood there, making and flying kites and playing marbles, until the age of 7, when civil war broke out in Somalia. He and his family fled to Yemen, where his father was already working as a teacher. Seven years later, they immigrated to the U.S., joining a vibrant Somali community in Minneapolis.
NATIONAL
November 25, 2010 | By Bob Drogin, Los Angeles Times
A federal jury convicted five Somali men Wednesday of piracy on the high seas, the first such verdict in an American court in nearly 200 years, for shooting at a U.S. Navy warship disguised as a merchant vessel in the Indian Ocean last spring. The conviction on all counts after a dramatic trial in U.S. District Court in Norfolk, Va., carries a mandatory sentence of life in prison plus 80 years. Defense lawyers said they would appeal. The five defendants stood without expression and listened to an interpreter through earphones as the court clerk pronounced them each guilty on 14 counts, including attempts to plunder a vessel and assault with a deadly weapon.
WORLD
October 22, 2010 | By Ahmed Mooge and Patrick Gallagher, Los Angeles Times
When Mohamed Ali Dahir, a 21-year-old business administration student, used to board the bus to school, he wasn't worried about being prepared for an exam or arriving late to a lecture. Instead, he braced himself for gunfire or other violence that might erupt while he was traveling the streets of Mogadishu. Even though his bus is clearly marked as school transportation, he said, there were times when even "the government soldiers open fire at us as we return from our schools or college.
NATIONAL
June 8, 2013 | By Shashank Bengali, Los Angeles Times
NORFOLK, Va. - As heavily armed pirates held an American sailboat off the coast of Somalia in February 2011, Navy SEALs on the bridge of the guided missile destroyer Sterett heard one of the hijackers on the radio threatening the lives of his four American hostages. "I am holding these people. They are like meat," he said. "I will eat if you head my way. " What happened next is providing riveting testimony in a federal courtroom here as three rail-thin Somali men in baggy coats face the first U.S. murder trial of piracy suspects in nearly two centuries.
WORLD
August 20, 2012 | By Robyn Dixon, Los Angeles Times
MOGADISHU, Somalia - As Somalia approaches its umpteenth attempt to forge a government that will actually stick, there's a deadening familiarity here: bloodstained warlords reemerging, clan elders manipulating politics, roadblocks going up as militias try to reclaim turf. And yet a year of relative peace in Mogadishu, long the world capital of chaos, and the recent adoption of a new constitution have raised faint hopes that this latest stab at shedding the "failed state" label might actually work.
WORLD
August 9, 2012 | By Robyn Dixon, Los Angeles Times
MOGADISHU, Somalia - They came to the stadium in late afternoon, a sprinkle of rain mixing with their sweat as they pounded around the rough sand track. This is Mogadishu and the stadium bears the scars of war, but the gray sky could have been golden. In every runner's heart, it was as if there were another presence in the stadium, running with them: Mo Farah, the first Mogadishu-born athlete to take Olympic gold, in the 10,000-meter final in London. Although Farah, 29, won for the British team, to everyone in this city, he's a Somali.
NEWS
December 9, 1992 | MARK FINEMAN and SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A strike force of 1,800 Camp Pendleton-based U.S. Marines swept ashore here before dawn today, taking over the airport and port and launching a humanitarian mission that will bring at least 28,000 American servicemen to this chaotic, famine-racked African nation over the holidays. The troops, deployed from a flotilla in the Indian Ocean, were ferried ashore by helicopters, Hovercraft and amphibious assault vessels, escorted by armed Cobra choppers that filled the gray, cloudy skies.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 31, 2014 | By Tony Perry
  SAN DIEGO - A cabdriver from Anaheim on Friday became the 4th Somali national to be sentenced to prison for providing money and other support to a terrorist group in their native country. Ahmed Nasir Taalil Mohamud, 38, was sentenced to six years in prison for his part in helping the al-Shabaab militia, which has been linked to assassinations, suicide bombings and the use of roadside bombs. Mohamud and the three others were convicted at trial of conspiring to support a group deemed by the U.S. government to be a terrorist organization.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 18, 2013 | By Tony Perry
SAN DIEGO - Three Somali immigrants - an imam, a cabdriver and an employee of a money transmitting business - were sentenced Monday to federal prison for aiding a terrorist group in their homeland. Basaaly Saeed Moalin, 36, the cabdriver, was sentenced to 18 years. Mohamed Mohamed Mohamud, 41, the imam, was sentenced to 13 years. Issa Doreh, 56, the employee of the money transmitting business, was sentenced to 10 years. The three were convicted of a conspiracy to send money from San Diego to Somalia to help al-Shabaab, termed by the U.S. government as a terrorist group linked with Al Qaeda attempting to topple the shaky governments in Somalia, Yemen and elsewhere.
NATIONAL
November 6, 2013 | By Shashank Bengali
WASHINGTON - When is a pirate not a pirate? A federal court may provide an answer in a trial that opened in Washington this week of a Somali official who helped win release of a hijacked Danish cargo ship and crew for $1.7 million ransom, but who played no part in seizing the vessel or holding it for 71 days. U.S. courts have convicted dozens of Somali pirates in recent years, part of a vast multinational effort that has helped curtail the rampant hijacking of oil tankers, freighters, sailboats and other ships off the Horn of Africa.
WORLD
October 18, 2013 | By Robyn Dixon and Alexandra Sandels
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- Kenyan and Norwegian authorities are investigating the possible involvement of a 23-year-old Somali-born Norwegian in a devastating attack last month on a shopping mall in Kenya, officials said Friday. The Somali terror group Shabab claimed responsibility for the assault, which killed at least 61 civilians, six members of Kenya's security forces and five attackers, according to official figures. The BBC identified the suspect as Hassan Abdi Dhuhulow, who arrived in Norway in 1999.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 14, 2013 | By Rebecca Keegan
Barkhad Abdi is used to finding his way in strange new places: At age 7, he moved with his family from war-torn Somalia to Yemen, where he learned Arabic on the soccer field. At 14, he moved to Minneapolis and learned English from Jay-Z songs and "Seinfeld" episodes. Now, at 27, Abdi has made himself at home in another new town - Hollywood - by starring opposite Tom Hanks in the film "Captain Phillips. " In director Paul Greengrass' fact-based thriller, which opened Friday, Abdi plays Muse, a Somali pirate who hijacks an American cargo ship and takes its captain hostage.
OPINION
October 11, 2013 | By J. Peter Pham
The Tom Hanks movie "Captain Phillips," which opens Friday, will focus attention - again - on piracy off the coast of Somalia. The movie, in which (spoiler alert) the bad guys get caught, unfortunately might lead you to think that this is a problem that's been solved. After all, since the April 2009 seizure of the cargo ship Maersk Alabama, recounted in "Captain Phillips," there has been only one hijacking of a U.S.-flagged vessel by Somali pirates, the February 2011 seizure of a U.S. yacht in which the Americans were killed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 22, 1992
After years of providing guns to the Somalis, the U.S. is now engaged in an Alms Race. HARRY SIMMONS Laguna Hills
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 26, 1992
Despite the concerted effort of food delivery by the U.N. and the United States to save Somalis from total annihilation, Somalis continue to die daily by the hundreds. It is said that a whole generation of Somalis has died of starvation and civil war. Relief agencies in Somalia report that the food donated as of mid-August is not even half of what is needed. The situation in Somalia is obscene and has surpassed anybody's imagination of what damage starvation, coupled with civil war, can do to human beings.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 10, 2013 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
When Paul Greengrass directs a thoroughly dramatic tale based on true events and Tom Hanks takes on the title role, you think you know what to expect. But just you wait - the piercingly realistic "Captain Phillips" will exceed your expectations. The story of the six days that Richard Phillips, captain of the cargo ship Maersk Alabama, spent in April 2009 first trying to avoid a gang of Somali pirates and then as their restive captive, this film does an impeccable job of creating and tightening the narrative screws.
WORLD
October 4, 2013 | By Carol J. Williams
Pope Francis lamented the mass drowning of African boat people off the Italian island of Lampedusa on Thursday as "shameful" evidence of human indifference to those in despair. President Giorgio Napolitano of Italy, where tens of thousands of desperate migrants cast up on remote shores each year, deemed the deadliest migration accident in the Mediterranean Sea this year a "massacre of innocents. " But U.N. officials tasked with protecting those fleeing their homelands put into unemotional perspective the tragic end to a boatload of migrants' dangerous gamble for a better life: an everyday occurrence.
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