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Somatogen Inc

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BUSINESS
September 18, 1992
Fluor Daniel said Thursday that it has won a $40-million contract in the large and growing biopharmaceuticals market. Somatogen Inc., a biotechnology company based in Boulder, Colo., selected Fluor to build its first manufacturing plant for large-scale clinical trials of its synthetic hemoglobin product. If approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, the synthetic blood would be an alternative for transfusions.
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BUSINESS
September 18, 1992
Fluor Daniel said Thursday that it has won a $40-million contract in the large and growing biopharmaceuticals market. Somatogen Inc., a biotechnology company based in Boulder, Colo., selected Fluor to build its first manufacturing plant for large-scale clinical trials of its synthetic hemoglobin product. If approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, the synthetic blood would be an alternative for transfusions.
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BUSINESS
June 28, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Lilly, Biotech Firm in Venture: Indianapolis-based Eli Lilly & Co. said it is teaming with Somatogen Inc. to make artificial hemoglobin that could be used as a blood substitute in emergencies. Boulder, Colo.-based Somatogen developed the product and is testing it with patients. The partnership will join a handful of other companies racing to get FDA approval for the first artificial blood. The agreement calls for Lilly to invest $20 million in Somatogen in exchange for Somatogen common stock.
BUSINESS
June 28, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Blue-chip stocks closed sharply higher Monday while bond yields fell, sparked by a stabilization in the dollar and by falling commodity prices and interest rates. The Dow Jones industrial average rose 48.56 points to 3,685.50, partially offsetting last week's declines. But some analysts suggested that the rebound could be short-lived.
NEWS
November 13, 1992 | ROBIN HERMAN, THE WASHINGTON POST
Physicians began to search in the 17th Century for potent fluids that could substitute for blood. They experimented by transfusing wine and ale into animals; they tried using dog and lamb blood in human patients--with fatal results. In a bizarre 19th-Century fad that swept the United States, medical researchers even infused milk from cows, goats and humans into the veins of patients.
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