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November 5, 2009 | Martin Zimmerman
A Westlake Village man was sentenced to 25 years in federal prison for bilking California and Texas investors out of more than $44 million. Curtis D. Somoza and co-defendant Robert Coberly, also of Westlake Village, were accused of collecting $64 million from investors with guarantees of easy returns, and then using much of the money to buy luxury homes, cars, yachts and jewelry. "This was an orgy of self-indulgence," U.S. District Judge A. Howard Matz said Tuesday before imposing the sentence on Somoza.
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BUSINESS
November 5, 2009 | Martin Zimmerman
A Westlake Village man was sentenced to 25 years in federal prison for bilking California and Texas investors out of more than $44 million. Curtis D. Somoza and co-defendant Robert Coberly, also of Westlake Village, were accused of collecting $64 million from investors with guarantees of easy returns, and then using much of the money to buy luxury homes, cars, yachts and jewelry. "This was an orgy of self-indulgence," U.S. District Judge A. Howard Matz said Tuesday before imposing the sentence on Somoza.
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OPINION
August 7, 1988
Why are there Americans (letters, July 26) who still side with those in control of Nicaragua? Within the past few weeks, we've seen armed thugs, some in uniform, some in mufti, break up the largest political demonstration in eight years; the country's only privately owned newspaper shut down; a church-sponsored radio station shut down for reporting the demonstration; 12 and 13-year-old boys pressed into service by the Sandinista Army, or sneaking...
BOOKS
July 21, 2002 | EUGEN WEBER, Eugen Weber is a contributing writer to Book Review.
"In the Clear" is a howl. Steve Lopez probably overdoes the hilariousness, but reading him is too much fun to notice, let alone to mind. A Times columnist, Lopez introduces us to Albert La Rosa, sheriff of a small town, Harbor Light, on the New Jersey shore, where independent fishermen have been squeezed out by conglomerates and where local storekeepers waste away, pressured by Bargain Acres, which bills itself as the largest retail space under one roof in North America.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 16, 1986
The contras of Nicaragua represent only the vestigial remains of the thoroughly reprehensible Somoza regime. They apotheosize rape, pillage and murder. They are supported not by the people of Nicaragua, but only by U.S. overt and covert funding. When funding for the contras finally dries up, they will go away and tiny Nicaragua will have a government of the people. The Reagan Administration's policy of aid to the contras is monstrous, inhuman, and should be punishable as a war crime.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 27, 1987
Am I being naive? Could the present state of death and destruction in Nicaragua have been avoided, if the United States had offered financial aid to the Sandinistas thereby preventing Soviet intervention and the subsequent formation of the contra rebels? The Times story ("Legacy of a Revolution," July 19), should be required reading by those of us who have been asleep concerning the revolution in Nicaragua. The in-depth report conveys that the Sandinistas have made great progress toward a democracy and an improved standard of living for its people after eliminating the Somoza regime eight years ago. MARTHA JACK West Covina
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 6, 1987
The essays by Kissinger and Wayne Smith ("Seeing Red: U.S. Policy in Latin America," Opinion, July 26) touch briefly on our biggest failing in foreign policy--management by crisis, coming in too late with too little. For decades, we looked the other way while Fulgencio Batista in Cuba and Somoza suppressed the democratic process, taking action only after the communists replaced them. Ignoring proposals from Latin democratic governments, like the Contadoras, we shove arms into the hands of Somoza's ex-police chiefs and call them "freedom fighters."
OPINION
February 21, 1988
I commend The Times for the publication of Galeano's eloquent and moving defense of the Nicaraguan nation. Without cant, hyperbole or hypocrisy, Galeano states the facts, which are that the Sandinistas have overthrown the Somoza dictatorship and established their own form of democracy. They have eliminated polio, and they have brought literacy to the people at large, who under Somoza could not read since only the upper-class was educated. They have distributed land to an essentially agrarian people who had no land.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 3, 1990
With all due respect for the retirement philosophy of one of history's greatest generals, Douglas MacArthur, the freedom-fighter Contras shouldn't lay down their arms forthwith, and "just fade away" into the Nicaraguan hills. Why demobilize an existing viable force for protecting the new democracy from internal subversion? Rather, these soldiers who, with only irregular U.S. support, fought long and hard for the democracy they now have, deserve an opportunity to use their hard earned experience and special skills to help preserve it!
OPINION
May 10, 1987
I was shocked to learn about the death in Nicaragua of Ben Linder, a 27-year-old engineer from Portland, Ore. Ben was a good friend and neighbor during the years I lived and worked in Nicaragua. Linder was assassinated by a group of contras in the northern Nicaraguan town where he worked on a hydroelectric project. It was no accident; Linder was specifically targeted by President Reagan's "freedom fighters." It's now official--our tax dollars go to murder U.S. citizens who contribute their valuable skills to benefit the poorest inhabitants of Nicaragua's countryside.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 15, 1991 | BOSCO MATAMOROS, Bosco Matamoros was an official in the Nicaraguan resistance.
With the attention of the world focused on the Middle East and the end of the Cold War, the geopolitical importance of Central America has all but disappeared. Those who assassinated Enrique Bermudez, the former anti-Sandinista resistance leader, in Nicaragua in February counted on going unnoticed by the world community.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 9, 1990
Nicaragua is not Lebanon--at least not yet. So recent reports that the Sandinistas are passing out guns to their supporters before handing the government over to President-elect Violeta Chamorro are not the cause for panic that they would be in Beirut. But it's an alarming development that must be stopped. The tactic is not new: The need for a well-armed militia has been Sandinista dogma ever since they took control of the popular revolution that overthrew Somoza in 1979.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 3, 1990
With all due respect for the retirement philosophy of one of history's greatest generals, Douglas MacArthur, the freedom-fighter Contras shouldn't lay down their arms forthwith, and "just fade away" into the Nicaraguan hills. Why demobilize an existing viable force for protecting the new democracy from internal subversion? Rather, these soldiers who, with only irregular U.S. support, fought long and hard for the democracy they now have, deserve an opportunity to use their hard earned experience and special skills to help preserve it!
NEWS
March 21, 1989 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, Times Staff Writer
During nearly 10 years in a Sandinista prison for his service in the pre-revolutionary National Guard, Octavio Borgen had plenty of time to count. He said his jailers beat him 27 times. Thirty-five times, the former captain recalled, he was put in a dark punishment cell with no room to lie down. Five times he was taken from his cell in Modelo Prison to El Chipote, a notorious interrogation center. Once he endured three days of hostile questioning without sleep.
NEWS
March 17, 1989 | From Times wire service s
Almost 1,900 members of former dictator Anastasio Somoza's national guard were pardoned today in the biggest prisoner release in the nation's history. The pardon fulfilled one of Nicaragua's commitments under a Central American peace accord signed in El Salvador last month.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 18, 1989 | From Reuters
Chilean photographer Alejandro Mella Lattore, accused of taking part in the assassination of former Nicaraguan dictator Anastasio Somoza, was freed Friday after spending nearly nine years in jail. "I'm free, it's unbelievable, it looks as if at last a terrible nightmare is over," Mella Latorre, 36, told reporters. "I'm sure that if Alfredo Stroessner had not been overthrown I wasn't going to be freed," he said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 13, 1985
Bill Curry's article (Sept. 2), "Private U.S. Aid--Boon to Sandinistas," documenting private U.S. citizens' aid to Nicaragua, will surely raise the ire of supporters of President Reagan's policy of hostility toward Managua. Such private aid is frequently denounced as "aid and comfort" to a Marxist enemy of democracy. Enemies of democracy are found in any regime that gorges itself upon the labors of a subjugated people. To an extent, a variation of this unfortunate scenario may be found today in the failed promises of the Sandinista revolution.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 9, 1990
Nicaragua is not Lebanon--at least not yet. So recent reports that the Sandinistas are passing out guns to their supporters before handing the government over to President-elect Violeta Chamorro are not the cause for panic that they would be in Beirut. But it's an alarming development that must be stopped. The tactic is not new: The need for a well-armed militia has been Sandinista dogma ever since they took control of the popular revolution that overthrew Somoza in 1979.
OPINION
August 7, 1988
Why are there Americans (letters, July 26) who still side with those in control of Nicaragua? Within the past few weeks, we've seen armed thugs, some in uniform, some in mufti, break up the largest political demonstration in eight years; the country's only privately owned newspaper shut down; a church-sponsored radio station shut down for reporting the demonstration; 12 and 13-year-old boys pressed into service by the Sandinista Army, or sneaking...
OPINION
February 21, 1988
I commend The Times for the publication of Galeano's eloquent and moving defense of the Nicaraguan nation. Without cant, hyperbole or hypocrisy, Galeano states the facts, which are that the Sandinistas have overthrown the Somoza dictatorship and established their own form of democracy. They have eliminated polio, and they have brought literacy to the people at large, who under Somoza could not read since only the upper-class was educated. They have distributed land to an essentially agrarian people who had no land.
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