Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSon Sann
IN THE NEWS

Son Sann

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 20, 2000 | From Times Wire Services
Former Prime Minister Son Sann, one of Cambodia's leading statesmen and fighters for democracy over the last half-century, died in his sleep in Paris on Tuesday, officials said. He was 89. Son Sann served as prime minister in 1967-68 under then-head of state Norodom Sihanouk, who is now king. Later, Son Sann became a leader in the battle against the Khmer Rouge, which turned Cambodia into a massive killing field.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 20, 2000 | From Times Wire Services
Former Prime Minister Son Sann, one of Cambodia's leading statesmen and fighters for democracy over the last half-century, died in his sleep in Paris on Tuesday, officials said. He was 89. Son Sann served as prime minister in 1967-68 under then-head of state Norodom Sihanouk, who is now king. Later, Son Sann became a leader in the battle against the Khmer Rouge, which turned Cambodia into a massive killing field.
Advertisement
NEWS
April 2, 1985
Secretary of State George P. Shultz will meet with two leaders of Cambodia's non-Communist guerrilla forces April 10 in Washington, the State Department said. The visit by Son Sann, president of the Khmer People's National Liberation Front, and Prince Norodom Ranariddh, representing a group headed by his father, Prince Norodom Sihanouk, was described as private. But Son Sann has been quoted as saying the visit is aimed at developing support for a $5-million aid proposal for the rebels.
NEWS
November 13, 1991 | Source: Associated Press
These three rebel groups will join Cambodian government to form ruling coalition: KHMER ROUGE: The strongest guerrilla group, the Communist Khmer Rouge ruled from 1975-78 with repressive regime blamed for 1 million deaths from executions, famine, unrest. Ousted by Soviet-backed Vietnamese forces. Estimated strength: 30,000 troops. Led publicly by Khieu Samphan and Son Sen, but there are rumors former dictator Pol Pot is still in charge.
NEWS
January 5, 1986 | From Times Wire Services
A rebellion in the leadership has clouded the future of one of the three Cambodian guerrilla groups fighting the Vietnamese in their country just as Hanoi is reported to be preparing another dry-season offensive against resistance forces. Dissidents say they have taken over the leadership of the non-Communist Khmer People's National Liberation Front headed by Son Sann. They appear to have won the support of most of its 14,000 guerrillas.
NEWS
January 12, 1985 | From Times Wire Services
Cambodian guerrilla leader Son Sann vowed Friday to switch tactics and reemphasize guerrilla war against the Vietnamese as a result of the takeover of his military headquarters at Ampil by Hanoi's forces. Son Sann, head of the Khmer People's National Liberation Front, told a press conference that his guerrillas would use hit-and-run raids to inflict maximum losses on the Vietnamese.
NEWS
June 6, 1990 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Cambodian government and the nominal head of the insurgent coalition warring against it signed an agreement here Tuesday for a cease-fire and an interim control council, but the Khmer Rouge, militarily the most powerful of the three rebel groups in the alliance, boycotted the pact. Prince Norodom Sihanouk told reporters that a two-day meeting, the first international peace conference in Tokyo since World War II, was a "half success."
NEWS
November 13, 1991 | Source: Associated Press
These three rebel groups will join Cambodian government to form ruling coalition: KHMER ROUGE: The strongest guerrilla group, the Communist Khmer Rouge ruled from 1975-78 with repressive regime blamed for 1 million deaths from executions, famine, unrest. Ousted by Soviet-backed Vietnamese forces. Estimated strength: 30,000 troops. Led publicly by Khieu Samphan and Son Sen, but there are rumors former dictator Pol Pot is still in charge.
NEWS
July 26, 1989 | RONE TEMPEST, Times Staff Writer
Preliminary talks between resistance leaders and the Vietnamese-backed Cambodian government broke down Tuesday, only a few days before a scheduled 20-nation Paris peace conference aimed at ending the Cambodian civil war. A meeting of the four parties scheduled for today was canceled. However, French diplomats insisted that the international conference, which is to include U.S. Secretary of State James A. Baker III and Soviet Foreign Minister Eduard A.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 31, 1989 | STEPHEN J. SOLARZ, Stephen J. Solarz (D-N.Y.) is chairman of the Asian and Pacific Affairs subcommittee of the House Foreign Affairs Committee.
As Vietnam prepares to withdraw its forces from Cambodia, Pol Pot and the Khmer Rouge, who cold-bloodedly killed up to 2 million of their fellow Cambodians the last time they held power, appear to be positioning themselves to once again seize control. In order to avoid such a dreadful denouement to the Cambodian drama, we need a comprehensive strategy designed to promote a political settlement that will end the fighting and effectively prevent the Khmer Rouge from returning to power.
NEWS
June 6, 1990 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Cambodian government and the nominal head of the insurgent coalition warring against it signed an agreement here Tuesday for a cease-fire and an interim control council, but the Khmer Rouge, militarily the most powerful of the three rebel groups in the alliance, boycotted the pact. Prince Norodom Sihanouk told reporters that a two-day meeting, the first international peace conference in Tokyo since World War II, was a "half success."
NEWS
July 26, 1989 | RONE TEMPEST, Times Staff Writer
Preliminary talks between resistance leaders and the Vietnamese-backed Cambodian government broke down Tuesday, only a few days before a scheduled 20-nation Paris peace conference aimed at ending the Cambodian civil war. A meeting of the four parties scheduled for today was canceled. However, French diplomats insisted that the international conference, which is to include U.S. Secretary of State James A. Baker III and Soviet Foreign Minister Eduard A.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 31, 1989 | STEPHEN J. SOLARZ, Stephen J. Solarz (D-N.Y.) is chairman of the Asian and Pacific Affairs subcommittee of the House Foreign Affairs Committee.
As Vietnam prepares to withdraw its forces from Cambodia, Pol Pot and the Khmer Rouge, who cold-bloodedly killed up to 2 million of their fellow Cambodians the last time they held power, appear to be positioning themselves to once again seize control. In order to avoid such a dreadful denouement to the Cambodian drama, we need a comprehensive strategy designed to promote a political settlement that will end the fighting and effectively prevent the Khmer Rouge from returning to power.
NEWS
January 5, 1986 | From Times Wire Services
A rebellion in the leadership has clouded the future of one of the three Cambodian guerrilla groups fighting the Vietnamese in their country just as Hanoi is reported to be preparing another dry-season offensive against resistance forces. Dissidents say they have taken over the leadership of the non-Communist Khmer People's National Liberation Front headed by Son Sann. They appear to have won the support of most of its 14,000 guerrillas.
NEWS
April 2, 1985
Secretary of State George P. Shultz will meet with two leaders of Cambodia's non-Communist guerrilla forces April 10 in Washington, the State Department said. The visit by Son Sann, president of the Khmer People's National Liberation Front, and Prince Norodom Ranariddh, representing a group headed by his father, Prince Norodom Sihanouk, was described as private. But Son Sann has been quoted as saying the visit is aimed at developing support for a $5-million aid proposal for the rebels.
NEWS
January 12, 1985 | From Times Wire Services
Cambodian guerrilla leader Son Sann vowed Friday to switch tactics and reemphasize guerrilla war against the Vietnamese as a result of the takeover of his military headquarters at Ampil by Hanoi's forces. Son Sann, head of the Khmer People's National Liberation Front, told a press conference that his guerrillas would use hit-and-run raids to inflict maximum losses on the Vietnamese.
NEWS
December 11, 1987 | STANLEY MEISLER, Times Staff Writer
Prince Norodom Sihanouk, dramatically puncturing a week of euphoria over the start of a Cambodian peace process, announced Thursday that he has canceled his two scheduled meetings next year with Premier Hun Sen of Cambodia despite their signed agreement to meet. In a note released to the press, Sihanouk denounced the 36-year-old premier whom he had embraced and toasted only a week ago. Sihanouk called Hun Sen "a lackey" of the Vietnamese who prop up his government.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|