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January 12, 1992 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Chinese President Yang Shangkun left here for a routine eight-day trip to Singapore and Malaysia, Premier Li Peng offered some cheerful advice. "Don't let yourself get too busy," Li counseled Yang while shaking hands goodby at a brief departure ceremony in the Great Hall of the People last week. Yang, a sturdy 84-year-old, bantered briefly with Li, then headed for the airport.
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NEWS
January 12, 1992 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Chinese President Yang Shangkun left here for a routine eight-day trip to Singapore and Malaysia, Premier Li Peng offered some cheerful advice. "Don't let yourself get too busy," Li counseled Yang while shaking hands goodby at a brief departure ceremony in the Great Hall of the People last week. Yang, a sturdy 84-year-old, bantered briefly with Li, then headed for the airport.
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NEWS
May 16, 1995
The most frequently mentioned candidates to succeed Deng Xiaoping are: * President Jiang Zemin, 68, the early favorite, holds all three top positions in the state and Communist Party. He became designated successor in 1989 when Deng Xiaoping named him as the "core" of the third generation of Communist leaders. * Premier Li Peng, 66, a long shot, is the main hope of the hard-line faction of the party. But he lost key support with the death of senior leader Chen Yun in April.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 17, 2007 | From the Associated Press
Bo Yibo, the last of the "Eight Immortals" who led China through the tumultuous 1970s and '80s, has died, the official Xinhua News Agency reported Tuesday. He was 98. Hong Kong's Phoenix Satellite Television said Bo died Monday at a hospital in the Chinese capital. No cause of death was announced. Bo, the father of China's Commerce Minister Bo Xilai, was a veteran of the 1949 communist revolution and a former vice premier.
NEWS
October 20, 1992 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Senior leader Deng Xiaoping emerged into public view Monday to savor a moment of political triumph and endorse a successor generation of leaders committed to his vision of how to modernize China. Deng, 88, the architect of China's 14-year-old economic reform program, posed for pictures in the Great Hall of the People with the 2,000 delegates to the Communist Party's 14th National Congress, which concluded Sunday.
NEWS
April 29, 1997 | HENRY CHU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The death over the weekend of one of the last remaining political contemporaries of China's late "paramount leader," Deng Xiaoping, will probably strengthen President Jiang Zemin's hold on power in the world's most populous country, analysts said Monday. Peng Zhen, one of the so-called Eight Immortals in China because of his role in the Communist takeover of 1949 and his enduring influence, died late Saturday. He was 95.
NEWS
December 30, 1986 | JIM MANN, Times Staff Writer
A group of five senior Chinese Communist Party officials were reported Monday to have made an extraordinary appearance in which they warned their countrymen against excessive Westernization and indirectly sought to blame recent student demonstrations on this trend. It was the first indication that tradition-minded conservatives in the party are using this month's wave of student protests to attack the open-door policies and economic reforms fostered by Chinese leader Deng Xiaoping.
WORLD
January 19, 2005 | Ching-Ching Ni, Times Staff Writer
Ordinary Chinese easily could have missed the death this week of a purged Communist Party leader who sympathized with the students during protests that led to the 1989 Tiananmen Square massacre. That's because the government has done everything it can to make sure his passing is a nonevent. The evening news continued to keep its silence Tuesday, a day after Zhao Ziyang, 85, died in a Beijing hospital after suffering a series of strokes. Newspapers ran brief items tucked into the back pages.
NEWS
September 17, 1985 | JIM MANN, Times Staff Writer
The Chinese Communist Party announced the resignations Monday of more than 140 senior party leaders, a move aimed at transferring power from veteran revolutionaries to a younger generation of leaders. After a series of meetings in the Great Hall of the People, the party's Central Committee announced the most sweeping change in its top ranks in almost a decade.
NEWS
May 29, 1987 | JIM MANN, Times Staff Writer
It was a sign of the times. China announced last week that the nation's universities will soon have some new professors in their midst. Beginning next month, Communist Party officials responsible for the ideological and political indoctrination of Chinese students will be allowed for the first time to hold the ranks of lecturer, associate professor or even full professor at the nation's universities.
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