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October 12, 2013 | By Robert Hilburn
Johnny Cash's life in the 1960s is mostly remembered as a time of glorious achievement - from the landmark prison albums at Folsom and San Quentin to the launch of the ABC-TV series featuring such guests as Bob Dylan and the Doors that led to his becoming a giant figure in popular culture, a symbol to millions, no less, of the best of American social values. But Cash also experienced excruciatingly dark times in the decade, fueled by drugs and guilt over the breakup of his marriage.
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NATIONAL
April 25, 2014 | By John M. Glionna
Are you heading to Bunkerville/To stand up and fight? Are you heading to Bunkerville/For your freedom and rights? Are you heading to Bunkerville/To stand up with me? -- From the song “Are You Heading to Bunkerville?” by Wayne and Paula Carson BUNKERVILLE, Nev. -- Susan DeLemus watched as her man headed to Bunkerville. The Rochester, N.H., resident was trolling the computer earlier this month with her husband, Jerry, when she saw him stiffen with surprise and rage at what he saw on his own computer screen.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 2014 | By Randall Roberts, Los Angeles Times Pop Music Critic
Musically speaking, one of the best parts of the breakout success of “True Detective” is the window it opens into the world of the Handsome Family. The husband-wife duo of Brett and Rennie Sparks composed “Far From Any Road,” used each week in the HBO mystery's opening credits, but that tells only a tiny part of their story. For the last two decades the pair has been using the blueprints of old-time country and western balladry to create dark but often lovely narratives set in the present.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 2014 | By Randall Roberts, Los Angeles Times Pop Music Critic
With spring arrives a fresh blossoming of seasonal metaphors to suggest new birth. A sprouting of unheard music arriving after months of cultivation. Proverbial butterflies crawling out of their cocoons. Bears stretching after deep sleep. In the immortal words of Peter Sellers' character Chauncey Gardiner in “Being There”: “In the garden, growth has it seasons. First comes spring and summer, but then we have fall and winter. And then we get spring and summer again.”  So it goes in late April, with the arrival of young music throughout the marketplace, the best of which is gunning for song-of-the-summer punch, making early moves toward July ubiquity.
BUSINESS
September 1, 2013 | By Jessica Naziri
Once upon a time, I listened to the radio. I even bought LPs, cassette tapes and CDs. But gone are those days. Now, I listen to streaming music, which has made staying on top of all the latest tunes as easy as a couple of clicks, all for about $10 a month. Some music apps focus on the basics (oldies are the goodies), others make recommendations based on your preferences or musical discovery, while others emphasize features like lyrics, sound adjustment and user interface.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 2013 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
We know too much about Mexico's drug war and not enough. We hear about it constantly, about the 60,000 murders and the slaughter of innocents, but getting a sense of what that means on the ground - and how pervasive its cultural influence is - is harder to come by. The potent documentary "Narco Cultura" is an excellent place to start. This dispassionate but devastating film looks at the drug wars from two very different but chillingly complementary perspectives. As directed and shot by Shaul Schwarz, an accomplished photojournalist who spent two years in this world as a still photographer before starting to film, "Narco Cultura" benefits from the access Schwarz earned through his time on the ground.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 2010 | By Matt Diehl, Special to the Los Angeles Times
"People used to say nobody can sing my songs but me — they're too personal," Joni Mitchell explained last week during a rare interview. Apparently, nobody told John Kelly not to try adapting her songs. The renowned Obie Award-winning actor and performance artist has been belting out Mitchell's songs for more than 20 years. This weekend, the New York-based Kelly concludes the L.A. run of his acclaimed solo tribute to the iconic, iconoclastic singer-songwriter, "Paved Paradise: The Art of Joni Mitchell," at Renberg Theatre.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 24, 2013 | By John Horn
Linda Ronstadt has disclosed that she is suffering from Parkinson's disease , and that the neurological disorder has left her unable to sing. The 67-year-old musician made the disclosure in an  AARP Magazine interview  posted online Friday. Ronstadt, an 11-time Grammy winner, said that she was diagnosed with the neurological ailment about eight months ago and "can't sing a note. " PHOTOS: Concerts by The Times “No one can sing with Parkinson's disease,” Ronstadt said.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 7, 2010
'Songs and Dances of Imaginary Lands' Where: the Songs and Dances Warehouse, 8810 Washington Blvd., Culver City When: 8 p.m. Thursday-Sunday and 2 p.m. Sunday. Ends July 18. Tickets: $25-$50 Info: (323) 655-2410 or http://www.overtoneindustries.org
ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 2014 | By David Horsey
Female country singers are complaining that their music is being pushed off the airwaves by a new crew of young, male, “bro-country” musicians singing interchangeable songs about dirt roads, pickup trucks, girls in tiny cutoff jeans and beer, lots of beer. Carrie Underwood is leading the charge, telling Billboard magazine that the country music business seems to have very limited room for new female musicians, but that it's different for the guys. “There seem to be so many male singers out there who can be viewed as similar, and there seems to be plenty of room for all of them,” Underwood said.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 2014 | By John Horn
SYDNEY, Australia - The video playing on the television inside Baz Luhrmann's bedroom was supposed to be much steamier. But where there should have been desirous bumping and prurient grinding, the couples were remarkably chaste, as if they had been ordered to abstain from all manner of randy moves. "Look at this," the filmmaker behind "Moulin Rouge!" and "The Great Gatsby" said from the foot of his bed. "You couldn't get any more sexless. " Working inside the creative compound he calls Iona in Sydney's arty Darlinghurst neighborhood, Luhrmann was sitting with a reporter, reviewing news clips from 1980s Australian ballroom dancing competitions, whose judges favored technique over passion.
SPORTS
April 25, 2014 | By Chuck Schilken
Terry Bradshaw has a loyal following in Pittsburgh. I don't know. Something about winning four Super Bowls with some team called the Steelers. So who better than the blond bomber to kick off a summer concert series June 14 that also features Motown legend Smokey Robinson and old-school favorites the Oak Ridge Boys and 38 Special at the Meadows Casino in Washington, Pa., about 30 minutes outside of the Steel City? Sounds great. He can just stand there and tell football anecdotes while laying on that down-home charm that has made him a favorite during Fox's football coverage all these years.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 14, 2014 | By Randy Lewis
It was an offhanded comment by singer-songwriter Jesse Winchester, but it stopped Elvis Costello cold when he was chatting with Winchester for his short-lived music-interview series “Spectacle” on the Sundance Channel a few years ago. In an aside, the inordinately gifted songwriter casually identified “The Brand New Tennessee Waltz” (one of the first songs for which he'd gained acclaim in the early 1970s) as the first song he'd ever written. Then he nonchalantly moved on to finish the main point he was making about the art of writing songs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 12, 2014
Jesse Winchester, 69, a U.S.-born singer who established himself in Canada after dodging the Vietnam War and who went on to write songs covered by Elvis Costello, Jimmy Buffett and Joan Baez, died of bladder cancer Friday at his home in Charlottesville, Va., according to his agent Keith Case. Winchester's best-known songs include "Yankee Lady," "Biloxi," "Say What" and "Mississippi, You're on My Mind. " Artists as diverse as Reba McEntire, Wilson Pickett, Waylon Jennings, Emmylou Harris, Bonnie Raitt and the Everly Brothers have performed Winchester's pieces.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 2014 | By Randall Roberts, Los Angeles Times Pop Music Critic
Bob Dylan's mercurial words on religion and spirituality have been examined for decades. Scholars, cultural critics and theologians have speculated with their pens, parsing the songwriter's syllables as if they were grains of sand. Entire books have focused on his spiritual explorations, beginning with his Jewish roots, his sometime embrace of evangelical Christianity and beyond. For all the words, though, few have argued its point more thoroughly - and with fewer academic buzzwords - than Brothers & Sisters, a choir of Los Angeles session singers who in 1969 gathered at Sound Recorders Studios in Hollywood under the direction of Lou Adler to record an album of the most uplifting and spiritually inclined works in Dylan's early canon.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 2014 | By Oliver Gettell
Does the "2" in "Rio 2" stand for "2 Much"? Not officially, but you might think so judging from reviews of the new animated musical, which finds Jesse Eisenberg and Anne Hathaway's blue macaws headed from the hustle and bustle of Rio de Janeiro to the wilds of the Amazon rain forest. Film critics say the movie is eye-catching and sounds good, but the story is overly familiar and overstuffed. The Times' Betsy Sharkey writes , "Wonderfully animated and well-voiced, 'Rio 2' is nevertheless too much.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 23, 2012 | By Todd Martens, Los Angeles Times
The London Olympics won't get underway until this weekend, but numerous songs from these pop-heavy games have already been released. As part of its "Rock the Games" music program, the London Organising Committee of the Olympic and Paralympic Games commissioned five songs. The first to appear was Muse's "Survival," and the last will be Dizzee Rascal's "Scream," which will be released midway through the games on Aug. 6. Here, we pit the official Olympic songs against one another and rank them the only way the Olympics know how: gold, silver and bronze.
BUSINESS
December 26, 2012 | By Salvador Rodriguez
Google recently rolled out a free scan and match feature for its Music service, but it seems to be switching explicit versions of songs with clean ones and vice versa. The Mountain View, Calif., company rolled out the new feature a week ago giving consumers a free alternative to similar services offered by Amazon.com and Apple, which charge $25 for their services. But earlier this week, reports hit the Web saying users are having their songs switched out for incorrect versions that either bleep out words when they're not supposed to or don't when they should.
TRAVEL
April 11, 2014 | By Chuck Graham
You don't have to travel all the way to East Africa to go on safari. Grab your binoculars and camera and scan the 50-mile-long Carrizo Plain National Monument for its array of wildlife. Carrizo Plain, about 100 miles northwest of Los Angeles and known as California's Serengeti, is the largest single native grassland remaining in the Golden State. It's home to the highest concentration of endangered species in California. Drive slowly on Soda Lake Road and search for herds of pronghorn antelope and Tule elk. The real challenge will be spotting rarer critters such as the blunt-nosed leopard lizard, San Joaquin kit fox, San Joaquin antelope ground squirrel and giant kangaroo rat. Don't ignore old fence posts either, favorite perches for raptors such as ferruginous and red-tailed hawks, prairie falcons and American kestrels.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 2014 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Wonderfully animated and well-voiced, "Rio 2" is nevertheless too much. Too much plot, too many issues, too many characters. But not too much music. Yes, the musical numbers reach saturation levels, but the Latin-influenced jamming and singing are absolutely fabulous. "Rio 2's" music might even save the 3-D animated action-adventure about endangered South American blue macaws from the terrible 2s that affect so many sequels. The eclectic animal and human cast and respective star voices that "Rio" introduced in 2011 have all reconvened to continue the party.
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