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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 11, 2000 | JANICE JONES DODDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A van carrying a mother, baby-sitter and three young children from Irvine was broadsided as it emerged from the Foothill Transportation Corridor toll road Saturday afternoon, killing a 4-year-old girl and sending others to the hospital. --Los Angeles Times, May 26, 1996 * A routine account of a Memorial Day weekend traffic accident. The victims are nameless and the details are few, but they convey life-changing tragedy. Parents reading it see their worst nightmare: the death of a child.
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NEWS
December 6, 2012 | By Todd Martens, Los Angeles Times
The Academy Awards haven't been kind to songs of late. The last few years, the category has been treated as an after-thought, with either one film dominating the slate of nominees or voters struggling to find five songs worthy of contention. After the nadir that was 2012, when only two songs were recognized, the academy has promised change. Five songs will be nominated for the upcoming awards, and once again the rarely showcased art of cinematic songwriting will be handled with grown-up respect.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 2, 2012 | By Patrick Kevin Day
Bob Dylan and counterterrorism? Say what? It may sound like an odd pairing, but that's exactly what Cinemax is giving us with the new season of "Strike Back," the channel's series about a stealth counterterrorism unit crossing the globe to squelch threats. For the second season, debuting Aug. 17, two brand-new Bob Dylan songs will be featured. The first song, "Early Roman Kings," premieres Thursday on Cinemax, HBO and cinemax.com. The video for the song will feature scenes from the new season starring Philip Winchester, Sullivan Stapleton, Rhashan Stone and Michelle Lukes.
NATIONAL
July 28, 2010 | By Alana Semuels, Los Angeles Times
Ben Jaffe, the tuba player and creative director for the Preservation Hall Jazz Band, was sitting in his Faubourg Marigny house one spring morning, drinking fresh-brewed New Orleans chicory coffee and worrying about the oil spill. He and music producer Bill Lynn had just watched oil executives blame one another for the Deepwater Horizon rig disaster, and Jaffe, who comes from a long line of jazz musicians, was sick of it. He glanced over at a glum Lynn, and as if by instinct, they started riffing on a standard New Orleans tune, "It Ain't My Fault."
ENTERTAINMENT
July 20, 2013 | By Randy Lewis
TUCSON - Sitting on a swivel bar stool near the kitchen of her home outside Tucson, Suzy Horton Ronstadt listened to the familiar words of songwriter Jimmy Webb's pop-rock classic "MacArthur Park. " Ronstadt smiled at first, then had to blink as her blue eyes welled up at the line "After all the loves of my life, you'll still be the one. " But unlike countless listeners who've shed a tear or two over the anguished romanticism of that sentiment since actor-singer Richard Harris took it to the top of the pop charts in 1968, Ronstadt has a special attachment to the song.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 1992
Pop Eye (Sept. 27) asks why Randy Travis' greatest hits were released simultaneously on two separate albums although they could easily have fit onto one CD or cassette. Travis' record company responds by claiming that the cost of publishing royalties made them do it, that "doubling the number of songs . . . would create a doubling of the price." Not true. Publishing royalties currently cost record companies a government-mandated maximum of 6 1/4 cents per normal-length song (among the world's lowest, usually split equally between writer and publisher)
TRAVEL
April 19, 2013 | By Michele Bigley
Kaunakakai, Hawaii - A fire that raged through Hotel Molokai's Hula Shores restaurant last spring did not keep the kupuna - and their audience - from claiming their spots near the lapping sea and coconut palms. For more than a decade, at 4 p.m. Fridays, 10 to 30 kupun a ("elders" in Hawaiian) have gathered at the hotel to strum their ukuleles and sing the lost songs of their youth. Half of the kupuna had their backs to the audience; instead of performing they sat around card tables sipping wine, laughing and enjoying themselves.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 16, 2013 | By Glenn Whipp
The film academy has released its list of the 75 songs that will be competing for the 2014 original song Oscar. Taylor Swift, U2 and Coldplay are on it. So is "Let It Go," the pop power ballad from Disney's animated "Frozen" that every 12-year-old girl already knows by heart. "The Great Gatsby" has five songs on the list. So does "Kamasutra 3D. " "Austenland" has four, and there's ... Wait. What? There are five songs nominated from "Kamasutra 3D," a movie that, judging from its trailer , looks like a glossy mashup of "Spartacus," "Pirates of the Caribbean" and a Zalman King compilation reel (not that there's anything wrong with that ... and, wow, the music must be great!
BUSINESS
December 26, 2012 | By Salvador Rodriguez
Google recently rolled out a free scan and match feature for its Music service, but it seems to be switching explicit versions of songs with clean ones and vice versa. The Mountain View, Calif., company rolled out the new feature a week ago giving consumers a free alternative to similar services offered by Amazon.com and Apple, which charge $25 for their services. But earlier this week, reports hit the Web saying users are having their songs switched out for incorrect versions that either bleep out words when they're not supposed to or don't when they should.
BUSINESS
December 19, 2012 | By Salvador Rodriguez
Google wants you to use its Music service, and it's willing to store 20,000 of your songs for free in the cloud to get you to try it. The Mountain View, Calif., company announced a new scan and match feature for U.S. users that will let them quickly store their music libraries to the cloud-based Google Music service. Users can then listen to their music on any computer or mobile device. Songs will stream at up to 320 kilobits per second, although the quality may be lower depending on your Internet connection.
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