YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSongs


December 6, 2012 | By Todd Martens, Los Angeles Times
The Academy Awards haven't been kind to songs of late. The last few years, the category has been treated as an after-thought, with either one film dominating the slate of nominees or voters struggling to find five songs worthy of contention. After the nadir that was 2012, when only two songs were recognized, the academy has promised change. Five songs will be nominated for the upcoming awards, and once again the rarely showcased art of cinematic songwriting will be handled with grown-up respect.
August 23, 2013 | By David Ng
"Amélie," the whimsical 2001 French film starring Audrey Tautou, will become a stage musical with songs by composer Dan Messé, who has revealed the news on the Facebook page of his band, the Brooklyn-based Hem. The musical, which has no dates attached, is being co-written with playwright Craig Lucas and co-lyricist Nathan Tysen. Messé recently wrote on Facebook: "So not the best kept secret, but still I'm happy to announce that I've been commissioned to adapt the film 'Amélie' for Broadway...  Can't wait to share it with you!"
July 29, 2010 | Los Angeles Times
New Orleans musicians often write about tragedies and the BP oil spill is no exception. These are just a small sample of the jazz, bluegrass, rap and other songs New Orleans musicians wrote about the spill. Nobody knows nothin' . Written by John Boutte, Bill Lynn and Paul Sanchez. Featuring the Preservation Hall Jazz Band with Clint Maedgen and Threadhead Records artists John Boutté, Paul Sanchez, Susan Cowsill, Craig Klein, and Margie Perez Ain't My Fault. with Mos Def', Lenny Kravitz, Trombone Shorty, Tim Robbins, Preservation Hall Jazz Band Sorry Ain't Enough No More by Shamarr Allen, Dee-1, Paul Sanchez, & Bennie of Hot 8 Sportsman's Paradise by Ramblin' Letters Sweet Crude Blues by John Bagnato Hey Tony!
February 18, 2011 | By Ned Parker and Doha Al Zohairy, Los Angeles Times
The song just came to him. Boiling with anger on that first day of February after Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak refused to step down, Ramy Essam grabbed his guitar. Within 20 minutes, he banged out lyrics cobbled together from the chants of the crowd in Tahrir Square, and then climbed a wobbly stage. "All of us are standing together, asking for one simple thing: Leave, leave, leave, leave," he sang, in a hypnotic echo of the words that had ricocheted through the square all day. "He will leave, because we won't leave.
July 28, 2010 | By Alana Semuels, Los Angeles Times
Ben Jaffe, the tuba player and creative director for the Preservation Hall Jazz Band, was sitting in his Faubourg Marigny house one spring morning, drinking fresh-brewed New Orleans chicory coffee and worrying about the oil spill. He and music producer Bill Lynn had just watched oil executives blame one another for the Deepwater Horizon rig disaster, and Jaffe, who comes from a long line of jazz musicians, was sick of it. He glanced over at a glum Lynn, and as if by instinct, they started riffing on a standard New Orleans tune, "It Ain't My Fault."
February 21, 2014 | By Susan King
Steve Lawrence loved to talk music with Frank Sinatra. During one of their chats, the Chairman of the Board asked Lawrence to name his favorite song. "I said, there are a lot of wonderful songs out there," Lawrence, 78, recalled in a recent interview. "He said, 'Name one.' I said OK, 'Moonlight in Vermont.' He said 'Why?' I said well to be honest it's the only American popular song I can think of that doesn't have a rhyme. " Sinatra was taken aback. "He said, 'Really? I recorded that song.' And he starts to sing it to me across the table.
April 19, 2013 | By Michele Bigley
Kaunakakai, Hawaii - A fire that raged through Hotel Molokai's Hula Shores restaurant last spring did not keep the kupuna - and their audience - from claiming their spots near the lapping sea and coconut palms. For more than a decade, at 4 p.m. Fridays, 10 to 30 kupun a ("elders" in Hawaiian) have gathered at the hotel to strum their ukuleles and sing the lost songs of their youth. Half of the kupuna had their backs to the audience; instead of performing they sat around card tables sipping wine, laughing and enjoying themselves.
December 19, 2012 | By Salvador Rodriguez
Google wants you to use its Music service, and it's willing to store 20,000 of your songs for free in the cloud to get you to try it. The Mountain View, Calif., company announced a new scan and match feature for U.S. users that will let them quickly store their music libraries to the cloud-based Google Music service. Users can then listen to their music on any computer or mobile device. Songs will stream at up to 320 kilobits per second, although the quality may be lower depending on your Internet connection.
December 22, 2013 | By Randy Lewis
The raison d'être of Stevie Wonder's annual holiday concert is the collection of toys for needy children in the Southland, something he's done enthusiastically for 18 years now, each edition featuring a different lineup of friends, musical colleagues and family members. Saturday's installment of Wonder's House Full of Toys at the Nokia Theatre, however, may have given the biggest gift of all to the audience of about 7,000: the first-ever performance of his landmark 1976 double album “Songs in the Key of Life” in its entirety.
October 11, 1992
Pop Eye (Sept. 27) asks why Randy Travis' greatest hits were released simultaneously on two separate albums although they could easily have fit onto one CD or cassette. Travis' record company responds by claiming that the cost of publishing royalties made them do it, that "doubling the number of songs . . . would create a doubling of the price." Not true. Publishing royalties currently cost record companies a government-mandated maximum of 6 1/4 cents per normal-length song (among the world's lowest, usually split equally between writer and publisher)
Los Angeles Times Articles