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ENTERTAINMENT
August 23, 2013 | By David Ng
"Amélie," the whimsical 2001 French film starring Audrey Tautou, will become a stage musical with songs by composer Dan Messé, who has revealed the news on the Facebook page of his band, the Brooklyn-based Hem. The musical, which has no dates attached, is being co-written with playwright Craig Lucas and co-lyricist Nathan Tysen. Messé recently wrote on Facebook: "So not the best kept secret, but still I'm happy to announce that I've been commissioned to adapt the film 'Amélie' for Broadway...  Can't wait to share it with you!"
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NATIONAL
July 29, 2010 | Los Angeles Times
New Orleans musicians often write about tragedies and the BP oil spill is no exception. These are just a small sample of the jazz, bluegrass, rap and other songs New Orleans musicians wrote about the spill. Nobody knows nothin' . Written by John Boutte, Bill Lynn and Paul Sanchez. Featuring the Preservation Hall Jazz Band with Clint Maedgen and Threadhead Records artists John Boutté, Paul Sanchez, Susan Cowsill, Craig Klein, and Margie Perez Ain't My Fault. with Mos Def', Lenny Kravitz, Trombone Shorty, Tim Robbins, Preservation Hall Jazz Band Sorry Ain't Enough No More by Shamarr Allen, Dee-1, Paul Sanchez, & Bennie of Hot 8 Sportsman's Paradise by Ramblin' Letters Sweet Crude Blues by John Bagnato Hey Tony!
BUSINESS
July 25, 2013 | By Ryan Faughnder
Many musicians and wannabe stars have enjoyed posting on YouTube their own versions of singer-songwriter Jason Mraz's first international hit, "I'm Yours. " Trouble was, Mraz had no quick and easy way to find those versions and collect royalties. Now he may have found a solution. Audiam Inc., which launched overseas last month and in the U.S. on Wednesday, searches YouTube for people using Mraz's copyrighted songs and collects part of the advertising revenue generated by those clips, under an agreement with YouTube.
NATIONAL
July 28, 2010 | By Alana Semuels, Los Angeles Times
Ben Jaffe, the tuba player and creative director for the Preservation Hall Jazz Band, was sitting in his Faubourg Marigny house one spring morning, drinking fresh-brewed New Orleans chicory coffee and worrying about the oil spill. He and music producer Bill Lynn had just watched oil executives blame one another for the Deepwater Horizon rig disaster, and Jaffe, who comes from a long line of jazz musicians, was sick of it. He glanced over at a glum Lynn, and as if by instinct, they started riffing on a standard New Orleans tune, "It Ain't My Fault."
ENTERTAINMENT
July 20, 2013 | By Randy Lewis
TUCSON - Sitting on a swivel bar stool near the kitchen of her home outside Tucson, Suzy Horton Ronstadt listened to the familiar words of songwriter Jimmy Webb's pop-rock classic "MacArthur Park. " Ronstadt smiled at first, then had to blink as her blue eyes welled up at the line "After all the loves of my life, you'll still be the one. " But unlike countless listeners who've shed a tear or two over the anguished romanticism of that sentiment since actor-singer Richard Harris took it to the top of the pop charts in 1968, Ronstadt has a special attachment to the song.
TRAVEL
April 19, 2013 | By Michele Bigley
Kaunakakai, Hawaii - A fire that raged through Hotel Molokai's Hula Shores restaurant last spring did not keep the kupuna - and their audience - from claiming their spots near the lapping sea and coconut palms. For more than a decade, at 4 p.m. Fridays, 10 to 30 kupun a ("elders" in Hawaiian) have gathered at the hotel to strum their ukuleles and sing the lost songs of their youth. Half of the kupuna had their backs to the audience; instead of performing they sat around card tables sipping wine, laughing and enjoying themselves.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 1992
Pop Eye (Sept. 27) asks why Randy Travis' greatest hits were released simultaneously on two separate albums although they could easily have fit onto one CD or cassette. Travis' record company responds by claiming that the cost of publishing royalties made them do it, that "doubling the number of songs . . . would create a doubling of the price." Not true. Publishing royalties currently cost record companies a government-mandated maximum of 6 1/4 cents per normal-length song (among the world's lowest, usually split equally between writer and publisher)
BUSINESS
December 19, 2012 | By Salvador Rodriguez
Google wants you to use its Music service, and it's willing to store 20,000 of your songs for free in the cloud to get you to try it. The Mountain View, Calif., company announced a new scan and match feature for U.S. users that will let them quickly store their music libraries to the cloud-based Google Music service. Users can then listen to their music on any computer or mobile device. Songs will stream at up to 320 kilobits per second, although the quality may be lower depending on your Internet connection.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 22, 2013 | By Randy Lewis
The raison d'être of Stevie Wonder's annual holiday concert is the collection of toys for needy children in the Southland, something he's done enthusiastically for 18 years now, each edition featuring a different lineup of friends, musical colleagues and family members. Saturday's installment of Wonder's House Full of Toys at the Nokia Theatre, however, may have given the biggest gift of all to the audience of about 7,000: the first-ever performance of his landmark 1976 double album “Songs in the Key of Life” in its entirety.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 2, 2012 | By Patrick Kevin Day
Bob Dylan and counterterrorism? Say what? It may sound like an odd pairing, but that's exactly what Cinemax is giving us with the new season of "Strike Back," the channel's series about a stealth counterterrorism unit crossing the globe to squelch threats. For the second season, debuting Aug. 17, two brand-new Bob Dylan songs will be featured. The first song, "Early Roman Kings," premieres Thursday on Cinemax, HBO and cinemax.com. The video for the song will feature scenes from the new season starring Philip Winchester, Sullivan Stapleton, Rhashan Stone and Michelle Lukes.
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