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Sonia Johnston

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November 24, 1994 | DAVID REYES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A faction of the Juaneno Band of Mission Indians that is embroiled in a leadership struggle was handed a defeat Wednesday when an Orange County Superior Court judge denied an injunction sought by an ousted tribal leader. In denying the action brought by David Belardes, the former leader at the center of the controversy, Judge James R. Ross said he did not find that Belardes' argument "had met the burden to merit any action."
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NEWS
March 3, 1997 | MICHAEL GRANBERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Juaneno Band of Mission Indians, who consider themselves the indigenous people of Orange County, first applied for recognition from the U.S. government more than a century ago. Today, with a new century nearing, they still don't have it. Soon, however, the Juanenos may be rewarded with their own equivalent of the Holy Grail, one they and their ancestors have pursued almost as long as the swallows have been returning to Capistrano. But there may be a problem.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 18, 1994 | MARTIN MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A group of Juaneno Band of Mission Indians elected a tribal leader and council Saturday, while an opposing faction called the results meaningless. Sonia Johnston was named tribal leader, but declined to discuss her new position Saturday night. Johnston said she and other new members of the Juaneno council would be talking about their roles at a later date. But David Belardes, the leader of a rival faction, was quick to dismiss Saturday's vote.
NEWS
March 3, 1997 | MICHAEL GRANBERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Juaneno Band of Mission Indians, who consider themselves the indigenous people of Orange County, first applied for recognition from the United States government more than a century ago. Today, on the eve of a new century, they still don't have it. Soon, however, the Juanenos may be rewarded with the elusive official status, one that they and their ancestors have pursued almost as long as the swallows have been returning to Capistrano. But there may be a problem.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 24, 1994 | DAVID REYES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A faction of the Juaneno Band of Mission Indians that is embroiled in a leadership struggle was handed a defeat Wednesday when an Orange County Superior Court judge denied an injunction sought by an ousted tribal leader. In denying the action brought by David Belardes, the former leader at the center of this controversy, Judge James R. Ross said he did not find that Belardes' argument "had met the burden to merit any action."
NEWS
November 23, 1994 | MICHAEL GRANBERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A growing rift among the Juaneno Band of Mission Indians is threatening to split them into factions and imperil their long-sought goal of establishing their own sovereign government as a federally recognized tribe. One of the Southland's oldest Native American groups, the Juanenos have fought for federal recognition for decades. Representatives of the U.S.
NEWS
November 23, 1994 | MICHAEL GRANBERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A growing rift among the Juaneno Band of Mission Indians is threatening to split them into factions and imperil their long-sought goal of establishing their own sovereign government as a federally recognized tribe. One of the Southland's oldest Native American groups, the Juanenos have fought for federal recognition for decades. Representatives of the U.S.
NEWS
March 3, 1997 | MICHAEL GRANBERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Juaneno Band of Mission Indians, who consider themselves the indigenous people of Orange County, first applied for recognition from the United States government more than a century ago. Today, on the eve of a new century, they still don't have it. Soon, however, the Juanenos may be rewarded with the elusive official status, one that they and their ancestors have pursued almost as long as the swallows have been returning to Capistrano. But there may be a problem.
NEWS
March 3, 1997 | MICHAEL GRANBERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Juaneno Band of Mission Indians, who consider themselves the indigenous people of Orange County, first applied for recognition from the U.S. government more than a century ago. Today, with a new century nearing, they still don't have it. Soon, however, the Juanenos may be rewarded with their own equivalent of the Holy Grail, one they and their ancestors have pursued almost as long as the swallows have been returning to Capistrano. But there may be a problem.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 23, 1997 | LISA RICHARDSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Jim Velasques, tribal chief of the Coastal Gabrieleno-Digueno Indians, picked up his mail at the front door Friday, he found a small padded Manila envelope containing a bullet. Painted white and with the threat, "Our ancestors await you" inscribed on it, the bullet became the latest in a rash of threats sent to people linked by their involvement with development projects. "The minute I saw that the envelope was padded, that was it. I knew what it was," Velasques said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 18, 1994 | MARTIN MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A group of Juaneno Band of Mission Indians elected a tribal leader and council Saturday, while an opposing faction called the results meaningless. Sonia Johnston was named tribal leader, but declined to discuss her new position Saturday night. Johnston said she and other new members of the Juaneno council would be talking about their roles at a later date. But David Belardes, the leader of a rival faction, was quick to dismiss Saturday's vote.
NEWS
November 24, 1994 | DAVID REYES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A faction of the Juaneno Band of Mission Indians that is embroiled in a leadership struggle was handed a defeat Wednesday when an Orange County Superior Court judge denied an injunction sought by an ousted tribal leader. In denying the action brought by David Belardes, the former leader at the center of the controversy, Judge James R. Ross said he did not find that Belardes' argument "had met the burden to merit any action."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 24, 1994 | DAVID REYES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A faction of the Juaneno Band of Mission Indians that is embroiled in a leadership struggle was handed a defeat Wednesday when an Orange County Superior Court judge denied an injunction sought by an ousted tribal leader. In denying the action brought by David Belardes, the former leader at the center of this controversy, Judge James R. Ross said he did not find that Belardes' argument "had met the burden to merit any action."
NEWS
November 23, 1994 | MICHAEL GRANBERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A growing rift among the Juaneno Band of Mission Indians is threatening to split them into factions and imperil their long-sought goal of establishing their own sovereign government as a federally recognized tribe. One of the Southland's oldest Native American groups, the Juanenos have fought for federal recognition for decades. Representatives of the U.S.
NEWS
November 23, 1994 | MICHAEL GRANBERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A growing rift among the Juaneno Band of Mission Indians is threatening to split them into factions and imperil their long-sought goal of establishing their own sovereign government as a federally recognized tribe. One of the Southland's oldest Native American groups, the Juanenos have fought for federal recognition for decades. Representatives of the U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 16, 2006 | Roy Rivenburg, Times Staff Writer
The skull of a Native American has been unearthed by construction workers at St. Margaret's Episcopal School in San Juan Capistrano, halting a chapel expansion project as archeologists sift the dirt for artifacts. The partial skull was discovered Friday afternoon and taken to the coroner's office for analysis, officials said Tuesday. A forensic anthropologist confirmed the remains were Native American and not recently buried, said Orange County coroner spokesman Jim Amormino.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 27, 1993 | T. CHRISTIAN MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Services were held Monday for Isabel Parra Grijalva, a lifelong resident of the county and a descendant of one of its pioneers. She was 104. A third-generation Californian born in San Juan Capistrano, Grijalva died July 22 in Santa Ana of natural causes. Grijalva was the great-great-granddaughter of Miguel Parra, for whom the Parra Adobe in San Juan Capistrano is named. The building, built in the 1840s as a stagecoach stop, is now a museum but is closed for repairs.
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