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Sonji Danese Taylor

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 3, 1994 | JIM NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The FBI has opened a civil rights investigation into the fatal shooting of a woman Dec. 16 by Los Angeles police officers who confronted her on a hospital rooftop, officials said Wednesday. "We've instituted a preliminary investigation into allegations of a civil rights violation in the death of Sonji Danese Taylor," said Special Agent John L. Hoos, a spokesman for the FBI's Los Angeles field division.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 8, 1994 | SHAWN HUBLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Closing yet another chapter in the controversial police shooting of a knife-wielding single mother last year, the Los Angeles Police Commission has ruled that the two officers who shot Sonji Taylor acted within department policy. The decision, announced Tuesday, came nearly a year after the Dec. 16, 1993, death of the 27-year-old Taylor, shot nine times on the roof of St. Vincent Medical Center as she babbled incoherently and threatened her 3-year-old son with a knife.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 1, 1994
The family of Sonji Danese Taylor, who was shot and killed by Los Angeles police officers last year, filed a $20-million claim against the city Thursday, alleging that officers used excessive force against her and then conspired to cover up their actions. "At no time during the course of these events did Sonji Taylor pose a threat to . . . police officers, nor did she do anything to justify the force used against her," according to the claim, the first step toward filing suit against the city.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 1, 1994
The family of Sonji Danese Taylor, who was shot and killed by Los Angeles police officers last year, filed a $20-million claim against the city Thursday, alleging that officers used excessive force against her and then conspired to cover up their actions. "At no time during the course of these events did Sonji Taylor pose a threat to . . . police officers, nor did she do anything to justify the force used against her," according to the claim, the first step toward filing suit against the city.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 12, 1994 | JIM NEWTON and MILES CORWIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Los Angeles Police Department on Friday denounced reporting by a local newspaper chain as "reckless and reprehensible" and said the publication had printed incorrect information about the Dec. 16 shooting of a woman by LAPD officers. The San Gabriel Valley Newspapers, based in West Covina, reported this week that investigators had discovered "as many as four 9 mm bullets" beneath the fallen body of Sonji Danese Taylor, a 27-year-old woman shot on a hospital rooftop.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 11, 1994 | JIM NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Investigators probing the fatal shooting by police of a woman on a hospital rooftop are focusing on at least one bullet that "mushroomed" inside the woman's body, a phenomenon that can indicate a person was shot while lying down, but also can be caused by other conditions, sources said Thursday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 4, 1994 | JIM NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Los Angeles Police Department and the Los Angeles County district attorney's office have squared off over a controversial police shooting case, with the LAPD refusing a request for documents on the incident and the district attorney convening a grand jury in response, sources close to the investigation said Thursday. According to the sources, county prosecutors recently requested internal LAPD documents concerning the fatal shooting of Sonji Danese Taylor on a hospital rooftop Dec. 16.
NEWS
February 13, 1994 | DIANNE KLEIN and JIM NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
There is an image of Sonji Danese Taylor summoned by the official accounts of her death that her family cannot countenance. Not today, two months after Los Angeles police shot her nine times, and perhaps not for as long as they live. The two officers who fired at Taylor on the roof of St. Vincent Medical Center just before Christmas called her behavior bizarre. They said she was threatening her 3-year-old son with a butcher knife. They said she was threatening them, lunging and talking crazy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 8, 1994 | SHAWN HUBLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Closing yet another chapter in the controversial police shooting of a knife-wielding single mother last year, the Los Angeles Police Commission has ruled that the two officers who shot Sonji Taylor acted within department policy. The decision, announced Tuesday, came nearly a year after the Dec. 16, 1993, death of the 27-year-old Taylor, shot nine times on the roof of St. Vincent Medical Center as she babbled incoherently and threatened her 3-year-old son with a knife.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 8, 1994
Police officers carry guns because they are in a dangerous business--protecting the public from those who would harm others. Police are, in effect, licensed to use the force that is necessary to maintain peace and order. In return, the community must feel confident that officers use that force responsibly and judiciously. That's why the Los Angeles Police Department should cooperate fully in the district attorney's investigation of a controversial shooting.
NEWS
February 13, 1994 | DIANNE KLEIN and JIM NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
There is an image of Sonji Danese Taylor summoned by the official accounts of her death that her family cannot countenance. Not today, two months after Los Angeles police shot her nine times, and perhaps not for as long as they live. The two officers who fired at Taylor on the roof of St. Vincent Medical Center just before Christmas called her behavior bizarre. They said she was threatening her 3-year-old son with a butcher knife. They said she was threatening them, lunging and talking crazy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 12, 1994 | JIM NEWTON and MILES CORWIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Los Angeles Police Department on Friday denounced reporting by a local newspaper chain as "reckless and reprehensible" and said the publication had printed incorrect information about the Dec. 16 shooting of a woman by LAPD officers. The San Gabriel Valley Newspapers, based in West Covina, reported this week that investigators had discovered "as many as four 9 mm bullets" beneath the fallen body of Sonji Danese Taylor, a 27-year-old woman shot on a hospital rooftop.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 11, 1994 | JIM NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Investigators probing the fatal shooting by police of a woman on a hospital rooftop are focusing on at least one bullet that "mushroomed" inside the woman's body, a phenomenon that can indicate a person was shot while lying down, but also can be caused by other conditions, sources said Thursday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 4, 1994 | JIM NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Los Angeles Police Department and the Los Angeles County district attorney's office have squared off over a controversial police shooting case, with the LAPD refusing a request for documents on the incident and the district attorney convening a grand jury in response, sources close to the investigation said Thursday. According to the sources, county prosecutors recently requested internal LAPD documents concerning the fatal shooting of Sonji Danese Taylor on a hospital rooftop Dec. 16.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 3, 1994 | JIM NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The FBI has opened a civil rights investigation into the fatal shooting of a woman Dec. 16 by Los Angeles police officers who confronted her on a hospital rooftop, officials said Wednesday. "We've instituted a preliminary investigation into allegations of a civil rights violation in the death of Sonji Danese Taylor," said Special Agent John L. Hoos, a spokesman for the FBI's Los Angeles field division.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 17, 1994 | JULIE TAMAKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Los Angeles Police Department will open a new police academy next month in the San Fernando Valley, but graduates won't be allowed to carry guns or wear badges. They will, however, be armed with new insights about how real police officers do their jobs. In yet another push toward community-based policing, 80 residents from throughout the Valley will take part in a civilian police academy, consisting of 30 hours of training on the use of force, traffic procedures and arrests.
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