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Sonnets

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ENTERTAINMENT
August 10, 2003
OK. 400 British actors have created a 98-CD set of Shakespeare's 38 plays. 102 hours for $600 ("To the Last Syllable," by David Gritten, Aug. 3). Just as notable is Shakespeare's 154 sonnets performed with enormous eloquence and sensitivity on a five-hour CD set for $19.95. They were recorded by one American actor -- Stacy Keach, considered by many as America's finest classical actor. Ned Manderino Silver Lake
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 20, 2013 | By David Ng
William Shakespeare is believed to have written 154 sonnets during his life. Carrying around the complete volume has never been physically burdensome since each poem is a mere 14 lines. But a new application for the Apple iPad and iPhone is seeking to make the sonnets even more portable and accessible. The free app, which is downloadable from the Apple store, is a multimedia experience that includes short videos of actors reciting the sonnets. New videos will be released on a rolling basis, shot on different locations throughout New York.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 20, 2013 | By David Ng
William Shakespeare is believed to have written 154 sonnets during his life. Carrying around the complete volume has never been physically burdensome since each poem is a mere 14 lines. But a new application for the Apple iPad and iPhone is seeking to make the sonnets even more portable and accessible. The free app, which is downloadable from the Apple store, is a multimedia experience that includes short videos of actors reciting the sonnets. New videos will be released on a rolling basis, shot on different locations throughout New York.
HEALTH
May 10, 2010 | By Robert Oliphant, Special to the Los Angeles Times
My name is Bob and I'm an exercise coward. I've tried to stick with various exercise programs but always failed until I reached 71 and my Kaiser internist prodded me into an honest shot at losing weight. To my surprise, this time I was able to stick with it — all because of a Higher Power, namely William Shakespeare. My Higher Power had hooked up with me five years earlier when my fear of senile dementia had pushed me into memorizing 20 of his most famous sonnets as a brain exercise.
NEWS
June 28, 2000 | BOOTH MOORE
Racks of free postcards advertising everything from vodka to blue jeans have become fixtures at urban bars, restaurants and coffee houses. And now, the group Writers at Work is hoping the postcard medium will help generate excitement about . . . sonnets? The Silver Lake-based organization, which has offered workshops and editorial services for writers since 1997, has commissioned eight local poets to write sonnets for distribution in 291 free postcard racks throughout the city.
HEALTH
May 10, 2010 | By Robert Oliphant, Special to the Los Angeles Times
My name is Bob and I'm an exercise coward. I've tried to stick with various exercise programs but always failed until I reached 71 and my Kaiser internist prodded me into an honest shot at losing weight. To my surprise, this time I was able to stick with it — all because of a Higher Power, namely William Shakespeare. My Higher Power had hooked up with me five years earlier when my fear of senile dementia had pushed me into memorizing 20 of his most famous sonnets as a brain exercise.
MAGAZINE
October 20, 1985 | BEVIS HILLIER
One of the most irritating cliches of journalism today is this: "What do X, Y and Z (three well-known people) have in common?" The answer is usually something like: "They all spread peanut butter on their watermelons," or "All three have their hair styled by Madame Snippette of Beverly Hills." The irreverent syllables "So what?" spring to mind. But I will ask: What do the three ceramic figures in the illustration have in common?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 29, 1998
On the congested, narrow streets of Bogota, Colombia, the buses are slow and the smog can be stinging. But the introduction of a bit of culture, Latin-style, now promises to ease the commuter's weary way on municipal buses. Many buses will have their own poets. The city Institute of Culture and Tourism has hired 15 poets to declaim the classics to Bogotanos bouncing their way to work.
BOOKS
March 29, 1998
I am in need of music that would flow Over my fretful, feeling finger-tips, Over my bitter-tainted, trembling lips, With melody, deep, clear, and liquid-slow. Oh, for the healing swaying, old and low, Of some song sung to rest the tired dead, A song to fall like water on my head, And over quivering limbs, dream flushed to glow!
BOOKS
April 19, 1998
Shall I compare thee to a summer's day? Thou art more lovely and more temperate. Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May, And summer's lease hath all too short a date.
OPINION
April 19, 2010 | By John Orloff
As the screenwriter of "Anonymous," the Roland Emmerich film about the Shakespeare authorship question now in production, I read with great interest James Shapiro's April 11 Times Op-Ed article, "Alas, poor Shakespeare." I was particularly fascinated by Shapiro's claim that U.S. Supreme Court Justices William J. Brennan Jr., Harry Blackmun and John Paul Stevens ruled "unanimously for Shakespeare and against the Earl of Oxford" in a 1987 moot court case. Shapiro has, at best, oversimplified the facts.
OPINION
January 5, 2007 | David Eggenschwiler, DAVID EGGENSCHWILER is an English professor emeritus at USC.
EVERY YEAR, as many California high school seniors struggle with basic algebra, which is required for graduation, Times readers complain, "Who needs it? How many students will ever use it?" Well, I use it every day; I'm using it now, even though I haven't worked an algebraic equation since my son was in the seventh grade several years ago. Mathematics and science are unnatural practices.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 2006 | Zinie Chen Sampson, Associated Press
An unpublished sonnet that Sylvia Plath wrote in college while pondering themes in F. Scott Fitzgerald's novel "The Great Gatsby" will appear today in a Virginia online literary journal. Plath, who committed suicide in 1963 at age 30, wrote "Ennui" in 1955 in her senior year at Smith College, said Anna Journey, a graduate student in creative writing at Virginia Commonwealth University. While researching Plath archives at Indiana University, Journey discovered the sonnet had not been published.
WORLD
June 17, 2004 | Hector Tobar, Times Staff Writer
Famous for his love of the sea, Nobel-winning poet Pablo Neruda wrote in his landmark book "Canto General" that he wanted to rest for eternity next to his stone and wood cottages in this hamlet on the Pacific. Comrades, bury me in Isla Negra before the sea that I knew, to each rough space of rocks and waves that my lost eyes will never see again.
SCIENCE
November 8, 2003 | From Reuters
The 14th century Italian poet Francesco Petrarch left hundreds of letters detailing his life and thoughts. Now scientists plan to dig up his remains to find out more about his flesh and bones. Researchers will open the poet's marble casket this month in Arqua Petrarca, a village in northern Italy where he died in 1374.
BOOKS
October 19, 2003 | Jane Yolen
The first time down, we saw him in the grass, Flagged by the white breast, the broad brown wings. Now we count on him each time we pass, Our talisman, mascot. What luck he brings We cannot know yet, not for weeks and weeks. We must endure your sores, your aches, your pains, Your quiet separation, your midday peaks, And the guarded optimism at your gains. What does the hawk mean? Nothing more Than a buteo on the hunt in a field.
MAGAZINE
March 12, 2000
Concept: Premiere L.A. performance of "The Vagina Monologues" at the Wiltern Theater, plus an after-party at the Atlas Supper Club to benefit Step Up Women's Network. * The raves: "I was absolutely overwhelmed by the opening sentence: 'I come from the generation of "down there," ' " says "Ally McBeal's" Portia de Rossi, "because that's what my mother had always referred to her vagina and mine and everyone else's as."
BOOKS
January 12, 1992
For that I have forgot the world these days, To enter at the smokeless lodge, and take Life naked at primeval hands, to make Clean comrades of large things in mighty ways; That I have wrestled with the huge dismays Which make the high head bow, the strong heart quake, That I have battled for a golden stake, Richer by every terror and amaze,-- For that I have forgot the world her cries In the vast painted silences, that men Have meant me nothing, under the great skies, Over the high hills of
ENTERTAINMENT
August 10, 2003
OK. 400 British actors have created a 98-CD set of Shakespeare's 38 plays. 102 hours for $600 ("To the Last Syllable," by David Gritten, Aug. 3). Just as notable is Shakespeare's 154 sonnets performed with enormous eloquence and sensitivity on a five-hour CD set for $19.95. They were recorded by one American actor -- Stacy Keach, considered by many as America's finest classical actor. Ned Manderino Silver Lake
NATIONAL
February 14, 2003 | Stephanie Simon, Times Staff Writer
The ambience is not ideal: The room smells of microwave popcorn. The decor is beige and floral, hotel-suite bland. The fluorescent lights buzz persistently. But -- amid the crusts of onion pizza -- romance is in the air. Jim Coppoc taps out a lusty iambic pentameter with his thumb. Colin Rafferty chews his pen furiously, then scribbles a rhyme of sly seduction. Molly Jo Rose, pushing aside her greasy napkin, fills a pale-pink page with passionate longing -- for a man she's never met.
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