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Sonny Landreth

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NEWS
November 4, 1993 | RANDY LEWIS
Sonny Landreth makes good on the title of his debut solo album by digging his heels deep into the rich musical soil of his native Louisiana. As a guitarist, he found himself in front of pop audiences touring with John Hiatt in recent years. Before that, he had played with Zachary Richard, one of the preeminent Cajun rockers.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 28, 2009 | Randy Lewis
The annual Long Beach Blues Festival will be topped in September by Mavis Staples, Bobby Womack, Kenny Wayne Shepherd and the Blind Boys of Alabama for the 30th anniversary of the yearly fundraiser for Cal State Long Beach-based jazz and blues radio station KKJZ-FM (88.1). The festival will run Sept. 5 and 6 at Rainbow Lagoon Park, and also will feature the Funky Meters, Johnny Winter, Sonny Landreth, Bettye Lavette, the Homemade Jamz Blues Band, Diunna Greenleaf, the Andy Walo Trio and the Hill Country Revue.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 24, 1996 | BUDDY SEIGAL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
You know you're developing a reputation in the music industry when record companies scramble to reissue obscure, long out-of-print albums recorded back when you wore elephant bells and ornately collared, puffy-sleeved shirts. Look in the CD bin under the name Sonny Landreth--who plays the Coach House on Wednesday night--and you'll notice that on his latest release, the 45-year-old guitar wizard looks like a little girl.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 9, 1998 | BILL LOCEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Capsule reviews of the latest releases of local bands and those that play around the area with some frequency. Gashouse Dave & The Hardtails, "Leavin' the Plantation" (Terra Nova Records) "You know, it was like you could die at any second, but I loved it," said Gashouse Dave, recalling his tour of duty with Top Jimmy & the Rhythm Pigs. Dave Shorey, a.k.a. Gashouse Dave, a fixture on the L.A.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 1995 | JIM WASHBURN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
One would think the pantheon of guitar gods would have a "No Vacancy" sign on it by now; the guitar has been the dominant instrument in popular music for four decades. Critics, listeners and fellow musicians have had no trouble, though, making room for Sonny Landreth.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 8, 1995 | BUDDY SIEGAL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Think of a bottleneck guitar and you may see visions of a solitary bluesman wailing away mournfully on a beat-up old instrument and singing of hard times. Or perhaps you'll think of Duane Allman, doomed to an early death, playing with an intensity that sounds as if he knows his fate. Guitar virtuoso Sonny Landreth could change those perceptions.
NEWS
March 30, 1995 | BILL LOCEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Sonny Landreth used to blow the trumpet--now he blows people's minds with his bottleneck slide guitar. Before becoming the main man in the '90s, Landreth gained fame as a sideman for the likes of John Hiatt, John Mayall, Zachary Richard, Michael Martin Murphey, Clifton Chenier and Beausoleil. Touring incessantly, Landreth--who opens for blues great Buddy Guy on Saturday night at Ventura Theatre--is even popular in France, a hard sell for Americans who aren't Jerry Lewis.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 28, 2009 | Randy Lewis
The annual Long Beach Blues Festival will be topped in September by Mavis Staples, Bobby Womack, Kenny Wayne Shepherd and the Blind Boys of Alabama for the 30th anniversary of the yearly fundraiser for Cal State Long Beach-based jazz and blues radio station KKJZ-FM (88.1). The festival will run Sept. 5 and 6 at Rainbow Lagoon Park, and also will feature the Funky Meters, Johnny Winter, Sonny Landreth, Bettye Lavette, the Homemade Jamz Blues Band, Diunna Greenleaf, the Andy Walo Trio and the Hill Country Revue.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 28, 1995 | STEVE APPLEFORD
"Do you know what zydeco is?" That's the question Louisiana-based guitarist Sonny Landreth asked an overflow crowd Thursday at Congo Square in Santa Monica. And in case anyone wasn't sure, Landreth provided a quick and spectacular lesson: 45-minutes of solo electric guitar, playing an expressive mix of Cajun blues and straight-ahead rock. The performance was a free-admission showcase designed mainly to promote Landreth's new album, "South of I-10."
ENTERTAINMENT
August 10, 1995 | BUDDY SIEGAL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Sonny Landreth, who played Tuesday night at the Coach House, is one of those little-known guys about whom music insiders whisper in hushed, reverential tones. A slide guitar wizard, he cut his teeth as a sideman for such acts as John Hiatt, John Mayall, Michael Martin Murphy, Kenny Loggins, Zachary Richard and Michael Doucet and, in the process, developed a deserved reputation as a unique and masterful voice on his instrument.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 27, 1996 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sonny Landreth seems like an awfully mild-mannered fellow to be shaking a world. In the world of rock slide guitar, such aces as George Harrison, Duane Allman, Lowell George, Ry Cooder, David Lindley and Bonnie Raitt have mapped out the style, establishing its boundaries, making its functions clear, its methods stable, known and pleasing. Now along comes Landreth, rolling and rumbling through that slide guitar landscape like the Big One.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 24, 1996 | BUDDY SEIGAL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
You know you're developing a reputation in the music industry when record companies scramble to reissue obscure, long out-of-print albums recorded back when you wore elephant bells and ornately collared, puffy-sleeved shirts. Look in the CD bin under the name Sonny Landreth--who plays the Coach House on Wednesday night--and you'll notice that on his latest release, the 45-year-old guitar wizard looks like a little girl.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 10, 1995 | BUDDY SIEGAL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Sonny Landreth, who played Tuesday night at the Coach House, is one of those little-known guys about whom music insiders whisper in hushed, reverential tones. A slide guitar wizard, he cut his teeth as a sideman for such acts as John Hiatt, John Mayall, Michael Martin Murphy, Kenny Loggins, Zachary Richard and Michael Doucet and, in the process, developed a deserved reputation as a unique and masterful voice on his instrument.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 8, 1995 | BUDDY SIEGAL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Think of a bottleneck guitar and you may see visions of a solitary bluesman wailing away mournfully on a beat-up old instrument and singing of hard times. Or perhaps you'll think of Duane Allman, doomed to an early death, playing with an intensity that sounds as if he knows his fate. Guitar virtuoso Sonny Landreth could change those perceptions.
NEWS
March 30, 1995 | BILL LOCEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Sonny Landreth used to blow the trumpet--now he blows people's minds with his bottleneck slide guitar. Before becoming the main man in the '90s, Landreth gained fame as a sideman for the likes of John Hiatt, John Mayall, Zachary Richard, Michael Martin Murphey, Clifton Chenier and Beausoleil. Touring incessantly, Landreth--who opens for blues great Buddy Guy on Saturday night at Ventura Theatre--is even popular in France, a hard sell for Americans who aren't Jerry Lewis.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 1995 | JIM WASHBURN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
One would think the pantheon of guitar gods would have a "No Vacancy" sign on it by now; the guitar has been the dominant instrument in popular music for four decades. Critics, listeners and fellow musicians have had no trouble, though, making room for Sonny Landreth.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 9, 1998 | BILL LOCEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Capsule reviews of the latest releases of local bands and those that play around the area with some frequency. Gashouse Dave & The Hardtails, "Leavin' the Plantation" (Terra Nova Records) "You know, it was like you could die at any second, but I loved it," said Gashouse Dave, recalling his tour of duty with Top Jimmy & the Rhythm Pigs. Dave Shorey, a.k.a. Gashouse Dave, a fixture on the L.A.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 27, 1996 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sonny Landreth seems like an awfully mild-mannered fellow to be shaking a world. In the world of rock slide guitar, such aces as George Harrison, Duane Allman, Lowell George, Ry Cooder, David Lindley and Bonnie Raitt have mapped out the style, establishing its boundaries, making its functions clear, its methods stable, known and pleasing. Now along comes Landreth, rolling and rumbling through that slide guitar landscape like the Big One.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 28, 1995 | STEVE APPLEFORD
"Do you know what zydeco is?" That's the question Louisiana-based guitarist Sonny Landreth asked an overflow crowd Thursday at Congo Square in Santa Monica. And in case anyone wasn't sure, Landreth provided a quick and spectacular lesson: 45-minutes of solo electric guitar, playing an expressive mix of Cajun blues and straight-ahead rock. The performance was a free-admission showcase designed mainly to promote Landreth's new album, "South of I-10."
NEWS
November 4, 1993 | RANDY LEWIS
Sonny Landreth makes good on the title of his debut solo album by digging his heels deep into the rich musical soil of his native Louisiana. As a guitarist, he found himself in front of pop audiences touring with John Hiatt in recent years. Before that, he had played with Zachary Richard, one of the preeminent Cajun rockers.
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