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Sonny Vaccaro

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February 14, 1988 | BILL BRUBAKER, The Washington Post
The most influential man in the world of high school basketball may be a paunchy, 48-year-old former player agent and one-time Las Vegas gambler who works for the Nike shoe and apparel company and who, if given the opportunity, "would go to a presidential ball wearing a Nike sweat shirt," according to his best friend, John Thompson.
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June 24, 2009 | Chuck Culpepper
Somewhere out there on the otherworldly Los Angeles freeways, maybe even at this very moment, steers a driver of uncommon skill. She has gone to the driving stratosphere and returned. She has demonstrated a deftness and bravery exceeding that of mortals and most Americans. She has just spent the bygone fall and winter and spring navigating R-R-R-Rome. It does wreak a shudder.
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February 18, 1992 | J.B. STRASSER and LAURIE BECKLUND
On the last night of Nike's annual week-long trip for college basketball coaches in August, 1986, a 1920s-style speak-easy was set up in an immense tent at the La Costa resort in (Carlsbad). As a '20s band played, more than 100 party-goers mingled, including some of basketball's best: Michael Jordan, Artis Gilmore, Moses Malone, Abe Lemons, Billy Cunningham, Lou Carnesecca, P.J. Carlesimo and Jim Valvano.
SPORTS
January 17, 2009 | KURT STREETER
The person who may have had the biggest impact on this week's UCLA dust-up against Arizona wasn't on the court at Pauley Pavilion. Instead, he sat in Section 213, Row 8, Seat 12, talking my ear off, letting off a tremendous amount of steam. "I have mixed emotions about watching this game," said Sonny Vaccaro. "I just can't watch without getting mad at the whole ridiculous system."
SPORTS
January 17, 2009 | KURT STREETER
The person who may have had the biggest impact on this week's UCLA dust-up against Arizona wasn't on the court at Pauley Pavilion. Instead, he sat in Section 213, Row 8, Seat 12, talking my ear off, letting off a tremendous amount of steam. "I have mixed emotions about watching this game," said Sonny Vaccaro. "I just can't watch without getting mad at the whole ridiculous system."
SPORTS
July 19, 2008
Why not have The Times do a story on Sonny Vaccaro and expose him for what he really is, the same as all the other agents and advisors who claim they have the player's best interest at heart. It infuriates me up every time I see his name next to the next basketball "phenom." I don't care how great a player is, one day their playing days will be over. Will Mr. Vaccaro prepare them for that day better than a degree from a university? I think not. Karl Ingram Walnut
SPORTS
July 5, 1992 | ROBYN NORWOOD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Nike, Inc., and basketball entrepreneur Sonny Vaccaro parted ways last August, the end of the relationship left both sides claiming the rights to a famous camp for high school basketball stars. Vaccaro says the concept was his, and so was half the name--Academic Betterment and Career Development (A.B.C.D.) Camp.
SPORTS
July 12, 1986 | SCOTT HOWARD-COOPER, Times Staff Writer
And then there's the one about Sonny Vaccaro being the most powerful man in basketball recruiting, about how he uses the annual summer Nike camp at Princeton University, an invitation-only affair, to get the best high school players into his Dapper Dan all-star game and then funnel them, with Nike shoe contracts, into colleges. That one has kept Vaccaro laughing for quite a while. Only problem is, the joke is getting a little old now, and it's become strictly grin and bear it time.
SPORTS
July 20, 1997 | MARK HEISLER
Sonny Vaccaro, the sneaker salesman who revolutionized basketball, inventing such phenomena as the high school all-star game and the bought-and-paid-for college coach, concedes it might not have been for the best, even if it was legal. "Go ask coaches why they don't refuse to take our money," Vaccaro told the New York Times. "Ask college presidents why they don't stop big-time sports. It didn't hurt the University of Chicago."
SPORTS
February 15, 1992 | J.B. STRASSER and LAURIE BECKLUND, "Swoosh, The Unauthorized Story of Nike and the Men Who Played There," 1991, J.B. Strasser and Laurie Becklund, published by Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, Inc
In the summer of 1977, a small-time basketball promoter named Sonny Vaccaro came to Oregon to see the men at Blue Ribbon Sports. Vaccaro, who had been referred by sports agent Jerry Davis, carried with him prototypes of a sandal-type basketball shoe he had designed and hoped to sell to Nike. About half a dozen managers took Vaccaro to lunch at a local Chinese dive, where they listened to him talk about his shoe. Nobody was very interested in it. They were fascinated, however, by Vaccaro.
SPORTS
July 19, 2008
Why not have The Times do a story on Sonny Vaccaro and expose him for what he really is, the same as all the other agents and advisors who claim they have the player's best interest at heart. It infuriates me up every time I see his name next to the next basketball "phenom." I don't care how great a player is, one day their playing days will be over. Will Mr. Vaccaro prepare them for that day better than a degree from a university? I think not. Karl Ingram Walnut
SPORTS
July 20, 1997 | MARK HEISLER
Sonny Vaccaro, the sneaker salesman who revolutionized basketball, inventing such phenomena as the high school all-star game and the bought-and-paid-for college coach, concedes it might not have been for the best, even if it was legal. "Go ask coaches why they don't refuse to take our money," Vaccaro told the New York Times. "Ask college presidents why they don't stop big-time sports. It didn't hurt the University of Chicago."
SPORTS
July 5, 1992 | ROBYN NORWOOD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Nike, Inc., and basketball entrepreneur Sonny Vaccaro parted ways last August, the end of the relationship left both sides claiming the rights to a famous camp for high school basketball stars. Vaccaro says the concept was his, and so was half the name--Academic Betterment and Career Development (A.B.C.D.) Camp.
SPORTS
February 18, 1992 | J.B. STRASSER and LAURIE BECKLUND
On the last night of Nike's annual week-long trip for college basketball coaches in August, 1986, a 1920s-style speak-easy was set up in an immense tent at the La Costa resort in (Carlsbad). As a '20s band played, more than 100 party-goers mingled, including some of basketball's best: Michael Jordan, Artis Gilmore, Moses Malone, Abe Lemons, Billy Cunningham, Lou Carnesecca, P.J. Carlesimo and Jim Valvano.
SPORTS
February 15, 1992 | J.B. STRASSER and LAURIE BECKLUND, "Swoosh, The Unauthorized Story of Nike and the Men Who Played There," 1991, J.B. Strasser and Laurie Becklund, published by Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, Inc
In the summer of 1977, a small-time basketball promoter named Sonny Vaccaro came to Oregon to see the men at Blue Ribbon Sports. Vaccaro, who had been referred by sports agent Jerry Davis, carried with him prototypes of a sandal-type basketball shoe he had designed and hoped to sell to Nike. About half a dozen managers took Vaccaro to lunch at a local Chinese dive, where they listened to him talk about his shoe. Nobody was very interested in it. They were fascinated, however, by Vaccaro.
SPORTS
February 14, 1988 | BILL BRUBAKER, The Washington Post
The most influential man in the world of high school basketball may be a paunchy, 48-year-old former player agent and one-time Las Vegas gambler who works for the Nike shoe and apparel company and who, if given the opportunity, "would go to a presidential ball wearing a Nike sweat shirt," according to his best friend, John Thompson.
SPORTS
June 24, 2009 | Chuck Culpepper
Somewhere out there on the otherworldly Los Angeles freeways, maybe even at this very moment, steers a driver of uncommon skill. She has gone to the driving stratosphere and returned. She has demonstrated a deftness and bravery exceeding that of mortals and most Americans. She has just spent the bygone fall and winter and spring navigating R-R-R-Rome. It does wreak a shudder.
SPORTS
January 24, 2009
Come on Mr. Streeter, get your facts together ["Shoe's on the other foot for Vaccaro," Jan. 17]. How can you leave out the fact that young Brandon Jennings was an academic non-qualifier? Don't you think that had something to do with his departure? Brad Kays Laguna Hills :: I have as much confidence in Sonny Vaccaro's evaluation of integrity in major college athletics as I do in Bernie Madoff's advice regarding ethical standards in the financial markets. David Glassman West Hills
SPORTS
July 12, 1986 | SCOTT HOWARD-COOPER, Times Staff Writer
And then there's the one about Sonny Vaccaro being the most powerful man in basketball recruiting, about how he uses the annual summer Nike camp at Princeton University, an invitation-only affair, to get the best high school players into his Dapper Dan all-star game and then funnel them, with Nike shoe contracts, into colleges. That one has kept Vaccaro laughing for quite a while. Only problem is, the joke is getting a little old now, and it's become strictly grin and bear it time.
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