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Sonoran Desert

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NEWS
January 7, 2014 | By Anne Harnagel
European firm Pure Adventures is rolling into the Western U.S. with both guided and self-guided bicycle tours. Among the first is a six-day, six-night self-guided bike tour of the Sonoran Desert, north of Scottsdale, Ariz., and Sedona and the surrounding red rock landscape. Bikers first meet in Scottsdale for orientation and a review of their planned rides and to fit their cars with bike racks. Rides on days two and three take place in the Sonoran Desert, where there is a wide variety of trails.  Lodging for three nights is at the Carefree Resort & Conference Center . Day 4 begins with an out-and-back ride on Black Canyon Trail, followed by a 90-minute drive to Sedona, home to some of the best mountain biking in the country.
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TRAVEL
February 28, 2014 | By Charlie Vascellaro, Special to the Los Angeles Times
For baseball fans, spring training may be the best time of year. For Dodgers fans, the Camelback Ranch ballpark and player development facility in Glendale, Ariz., provides a ringside seat to a hope that is both eternal and immediate, given the team's current lineup of talent. For Angels fans, a star-studded cast has returned for the team's 22nd consecutive season at Tempe Diablo Stadium. And if you're not a baseball fan, there's always the beauty of the Sonoran Desert and a variety of resort accommodations and entertainment options along the Cactus League's periphery.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 14, 1999 | ARTHUR H. ROTSTEIN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The idea for a new national park in southwestern Arizona has been kicking around for more than 30 years, first endorsed by then-Interior Secretary Stewart Udall in 1966. Now the proposal, which President Lyndon Johnson never acted on, has been resurrected. It would combine three huge chunks of federal land along the Mexican border, more than 3 million acres, into the Sonoran Desert National Park and Preserve.
NEWS
January 7, 2014 | By Anne Harnagel
European firm Pure Adventures is rolling into the Western U.S. with both guided and self-guided bicycle tours. Among the first is a six-day, six-night self-guided bike tour of the Sonoran Desert, north of Scottsdale, Ariz., and Sedona and the surrounding red rock landscape. Bikers first meet in Scottsdale for orientation and a review of their planned rides and to fit their cars with bike racks. Rides on days two and three take place in the Sonoran Desert, where there is a wide variety of trails.  Lodging for three nights is at the Carefree Resort & Conference Center . Day 4 begins with an out-and-back ride on Black Canyon Trail, followed by a 90-minute drive to Sedona, home to some of the best mountain biking in the country.
BOOKS
December 13, 1992 | Susan Reynolds
This unusually fine complement of subject, photograph and text combines the work of Pulitzer Prize-winning photographer Dykinga with text by Charles Bowden, author of "Frog Mountain Blues" and, most recently, "Desierto." Bowden writes like the desert; you can tell it's in his blood. "I feel a keening within me," he writes, "My hearing is more acute, my nose savors the smells." The photographs have that other desert quality, clarity, the keening Bowden writes about.
TRAVEL
September 24, 2000 | SUSAN SPANO, IMES TRAVEL WRITER
San Diego de Alcala, San Carlos Borromeo de Carmelo, San Antonio de Padua. So begins the list of missions founded along the Pacific Coast in the late 18th century, reminders of California's Spanish colonial past. But they were not the first outposts of European civilization at the edge of the Spanish Empire.
HOME & GARDEN
September 26, 2009 | Emily Green
The classic trees of California are big. Redwoods. Monterey pines. Valley oaks. So, for those of us who live in cities but want a California native garden, where's the giant sequoia supposed to fit? My vote would be to tear down the house, but San Juan Capistrano nurseryman Mike Evans has a different idea. The man who for two decades has been a pillar of the native gardening community thinks that many Southern Californian homes with small gardens can be better off with exotic trees.
TRAVEL
November 12, 2000
I enjoyed Susan Spano's article on her tour of Father Eusebio Kino's missions in Arizona and Mexico ("To the Sonoran Desert, on a Mission," Sept. 24). I had never heard of Father Kino until I attended the University of Arizona in Tucson. There was no mention in the article of the folk tradition of placing small gold or silver objects depicting a body part needing healing or other requests on statues of saints, like the St. Francis Xavier statue at the San Xavier mission in Tucson. MARY K. HANSEN Pasadena
TRAVEL
October 28, 2007 | Rosemary McClure
Brush up on your photography skills, learn how to use a compass and make maps, or explore the mountains and valleys of the Sonoran Desert with classes organized by the Desert Institute at Joshua Tree National Park. The one- or two-day weekend classes, scheduled through Dec. 16 and Feb. 23 to May 3, focus on survival skills, exploration of the park and its cultural history. Information: Call (760) 367-5535, see www.joshuatree.org or e-mail desert institute@zippnet.net for a schedule.
TRAVEL
October 28, 2007 | By Rosemary McClure, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
Brush up on your photography skills, learn how to use a compass and make maps, or explore the mountains and valleys of the Sonoran Desert with classes organized by the Desert Institute at Joshua Tree National Park. The one- or two-day weekend classes, scheduled through Dec. 16 and Feb. 23 to May 3, focus on survival skills, exploration of the park and its cultural history. Information: Call (760) 367-5535, see www.joshuatree.org or e-mail desert institute@zippnet.net for a schedule.
NATIONAL
May 6, 2013 | By Cindy Carcamo, Los Angeles Times
TUCSON - The harsh Sonoran Desert claims the lives of hundreds of people crossing the U.S.-Mexico border each year. Many of the dead - about 1 in 3 - go unidentified. Now there may be an easier way to put a name to some of the suspected border crossers who died north of the international boundary. On Monday, the Pima County Office of the Medical Examiner and the human rights organization Humane Borders Inc. started an online system that will allow the public to identify the deceased found in southern Arizona - more than 2,000 deaths over 13 years.
NATIONAL
October 17, 2012 | By John M. Glionna, Los Angeles Times
TUCSON - She probably never imagined things would go so wrong - that she'd end up here, on a scuffed metal gurney in a coroner's office far from home. Still, at age 22, she was old enough to know the dangers of stealing across the U.S. border from Mexico onto a lethal desert landscape, where she would have to take crazy chances amid the heat, cold and rattlesnakes to avoid capture by la migra , the U.S. Border Patrol. Her body was found in early 2009 near a service road, a two-day walk from the border.
BUSINESS
March 23, 2012 | By Deborah Netburn
Cheers to the Pima Air & Space Museum for flying what might be the largest paper airplane ever constructed over the Arizona desert earlier this week. The plane, dubbed Arturo's Desert Eagle, was 45 feet long with a 24-foot wingspan and weighed in at a whopping 800 pounds. It was built as part of the museum's Giant Paper Airplane Project , designed to get kids psyched about aviation and engineering. After a few false starts, the plane was towed into the sky above the Sonoran desert on Wednesday afternoon by a Sikorsky S58T helicopter.
NATIONAL
April 16, 2011 | By Kate Linthicum, Los Angeles Times
Debbie Eldridge was lolling about her 40-foot-long Monaco Diplomat luxury motor home with her twin sister, Betty Hayden, cooling off with a Diet Pepsi after a marathon morning at the flea markets. Eldridge, 58, had reaped a modest haul — a dog toy for her beloved bichon, Boomer, and a decorative sun sculpture that she planned to display in the backyard of her real home in Merced, Calif. Hayden was sporting her newest acquisition: a pink fringed T-shirt that read, "Quartzsite, Arizona.
HOME & GARDEN
September 26, 2009 | Emily Green
The classic trees of California are big. Redwoods. Monterey pines. Valley oaks. So, for those of us who live in cities but want a California native garden, where's the giant sequoia supposed to fit? My vote would be to tear down the house, but San Juan Capistrano nurseryman Mike Evans has a different idea. The man who for two decades has been a pillar of the native gardening community thinks that many Southern Californian homes with small gardens can be better off with exotic trees.
TRAVEL
October 28, 2007 | Rosemary McClure
Brush up on your photography skills, learn how to use a compass and make maps, or explore the mountains and valleys of the Sonoran Desert with classes organized by the Desert Institute at Joshua Tree National Park. The one- or two-day weekend classes, scheduled through Dec. 16 and Feb. 23 to May 3, focus on survival skills, exploration of the park and its cultural history. Information: Call (760) 367-5535, see www.joshuatree.org or e-mail desert institute@zippnet.net for a schedule.
BOOKS
February 26, 1989
Bob Sipchen's review of Charles Bowden's "Mezcal" (Book Review, Jan. 8) mistakenly calls the agave (the source of the potent liquor which gives the book its title) a cactus. The heading, "A Taste of Cactus," is also wrong. The distinct Agave family, which includes the snowdrop and the amaryllis, are all succulents. In the Sonoran Desert, visitors tend to call everything a cactus, including the yucca and the ocotillo. All have uses, practical, ornamental, and nutritional, and most have thorns.
TRAVEL
October 28, 2007 | By Rosemary McClure, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
Brush up on your photography skills, learn how to use a compass and make maps, or explore the mountains and valleys of the Sonoran Desert with classes organized by the Desert Institute at Joshua Tree National Park. The one- or two-day weekend classes, scheduled through Dec. 16 and Feb. 23 to May 3, focus on survival skills, exploration of the park and its cultural history. Information: Call (760) 367-5535, see www.joshuatree.org or e-mail desert institute@zippnet.net for a schedule.
TRAVEL
October 6, 2002 | JAMES T. YENCKEL
When you check into a luxury resort, you don't expect to find a notice in your room cautioning you about rattlesnake encounters. As a guest with my wife, Sandy, at the new Four Seasons Resort in the desert just north of Phoenix, I watched where I stepped. In this part of the country, the good life comes with a drawback or two. I never did see a snake--although lots of rabbits hopped just beyond my feet as I strolled to the pool each morning.
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