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Sons And Daughters

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OPINION
November 13, 2004
How much longer would this disastrous Iraqi war last if all Americans who support it, starting with George W. Bush, were required to send their sons and daughters to fight in Fallouja? Marinka Horack Huntington Beach
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
December 26, 2012
Re "Waiting for the last plane out," Opinion, Dec. 23 I had tears in my eyes reading David Freed's Op-Ed article about not seeing his son, who is probably stationed in Afghanistan, this Christmas. I share his feelings of longing to be with a son at familiar family outings. My son flies air cover on six-hour missions over Afghanistan from the aircraft carrier Dwight D. Eisenhower. From 20,000 feet he looks down on a land that seems so desolate and bleak. He is grateful not to be stationed on the ground, but he's perfectly willing to fly close to the ground to protect his comrades in arms.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 27, 1999
If the letters to the editor are any indication, it would appear that the public is rather indifferent to the terrible Marine helicopter accident on Dec. 9 in the San Diego area. This unnecessary accident could be attributed to the inferior equipment provided for our fighting men. The helicopter involved dated back to the Vietnam War. It is absolutely amazing that our president and his cohorts, while showering our people in the military with all kinds of platitudes, are capable of doling out millions of dollars for other countries while ignoring the safety of our sons and daughters in the military.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 14, 2012 | Steve Lopez
Araceli Magdalena Rodriguez remembers precisely when her son first said he wanted to be a policeman. She went to the market one day in their community near Puebla, Mexico, when he was 4 years old and returned home empty-handed after a pickpocket stole her wallet. "Where are my bananas?" Luis Angel Leon Rodriguez asked his mother. When she told him what had happened, the boy said he would grow up to be a police officer and catch the thief. Nearly 20 years later, Luis Angel became a federal police officer, but when his mother told me the story Monday afternoon on a visit to Los Angeles, she was in tears.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 14, 2000 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A former Orange County high school athlete retracted his claims of sexual abuse against his adoptive father and was sentenced to 21 years in prison for killing the man. Matthew Swearingen, 19, pleaded guilty Friday to voluntary manslaughter in a plea agreement for the 1998 killing of his father. Swearingen also admitted to his probation officer that his father, Robert Swearingen, did not molest him.
OPINION
September 14, 2003
Gen. Richard B. Myers, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, said in defense of the lack of stability in Iraq that "we have done everything we can do ... because we are dealing with our most precious treasure, and that's the blood of our sons and daughters" (Sept. 10). Really? How many sons and daughters of our administration and of our Congress are in harm's way in Iraq? Or Afghanistan? Or anywhere? These are not rhetorical questions. And while we're counting, how many sons and daughters of our administration and of our Congress are Washington lobbyists?
OPINION
December 14, 2006
Re "Larger U.S. effort in Iraq is proposed," Dec. 13 A proposed troop increase is an attempt to save face in light of an inevitable reality: The U.S. is going to withdraw from Iraq with less than what it would consider a total victory. Whether this means our definition of victory needs to change or our willingness to use military force needs to be reexamined is a question best left to historians and policymakers in the post-Iraq war world. What is critical to understand now is that any policy prolonging our presence in Iraq does not serve our national interest and represents a dangerous disconnection from reality.
NEWS
May 28, 1989
Nothing could have pleased me more than reading the Willie Bogan story ("Glory Redux" by Nikki Finke, May 16). It was, in fact, a thrilling read, and a reminder of the old, glory days when poor but hard-working and ambitious black American parents--as many still do today--inspired their children to seek higher education "as a way out" and when those children, motivated by their parents, became academic All-Americans, or students first, athletes second....
OPINION
December 26, 2012
Re "Waiting for the last plane out," Opinion, Dec. 23 I had tears in my eyes reading David Freed's Op-Ed article about not seeing his son, who is probably stationed in Afghanistan, this Christmas. I share his feelings of longing to be with a son at familiar family outings. My son flies air cover on six-hour missions over Afghanistan from the aircraft carrier Dwight D. Eisenhower. From 20,000 feet he looks down on a land that seems so desolate and bleak. He is grateful not to be stationed on the ground, but he's perfectly willing to fly close to the ground to protect his comrades in arms.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 26, 1992 | Steve Hochman
Jakob Dylan joins a long list of pop star offspring who have pursued musical careers. Some of the others: Julian Lennon: John's older son hit big in 1984 with his "Too Late for Goodbyes" and "Valotte" singles. But recently he has struggled. Wilson Phillips: Beach Boy Brian Wilson's daughters Carnie and Wendy and Papa John and Mama Michelle Phillips' Chynna sold more than 5 million copies of their debut album, "Wilson Phillips."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 14, 2012 | By John Hoeffel and Lee Romney, Los Angeles Times
During Nirbhay Singh's eight years as lead consultant for California's psychiatric hospitals, state officials hired his relatives, then urged the facilities to use a little-known therapy and psychological questionnaire they had devised, state records and interviews show. To fill out Singh's consulting team, the Department of Mental Health in 2006 hired his wife, Judy Singh, whose background is in reading comprehension and adult literacy. Over 41/2 years, she earned more than $340,000, primarily training staff members in a therapy she helped develop, state records show.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 18, 2011 | By Tony Perry, Los Angeles Times
For most of America, the war in Iraq officially ended last week with a speech-laden ceremony in Baghdad. But for Karen Mendoza and the other 2,000-plus widows of U.S. military personnel killed in Baghdad, Fallouja, Ramadi and dozens of other cities and towns, the war in Iraq will never truly be over. "Being a widow is a full-time job," said Mendoza, whose husband, Marine Maj. Ray Mendoza, 37, was killed in November 2005 when he stepped on a land mine while leading Marines from Camp Pendleton into combat near the Syrian border.
NATIONAL
November 24, 2011 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Search and rescue personnel found the body of a child and worked Thursday to recover the remains of five other passengers killed when a twin-engine plane slammed into a rugged mountaintop cliff near Phoenix, authorities said. Officials landed a helicopter near the crash scene in the Flatiron part of the Superstition Mountains east of Apache Junction, said Elias Johnson of the Pinal County Sheriff's Department. Video from news helicopters Thursday showed the wreckage strewn at the bottom of a blackened cliff.
NATIONAL
May 31, 2009 | Geraldine Baum
After completing a freshman seminar about immigration in New York, Anita Sonawane, a brainy undergraduate who happens to be a New York immigrant, had a transformative aha moment. It was something the professor said. "Oh, come on, Anita, you know you're not going to be a doctor," Jeff Maskovsky, an urban studies professor at Queens College, told her, hoping to challenge the idea that the only way to succeed in America was to practice medicine.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 22, 2009 | Steve Chawkins
The intruder climbed a stairway tucked amid the rocks, walked through an open patio door into the beach house and, with repeated knife slashes, thrust a family into a nightmare. Authorities said Thursday they had no suspect or motive in the slayings at the upscale Faria Beach Colony, a gated community about six miles up the coast from Ventura. The killer stabbed to death a pregnant woman and her husband about 10:30 p.m. Wednesday as their horrified 9-year-old son looked on.
NEWS
March 18, 2007 | Audrey McAvoy, Associated Press Writer
Manuel S. Pablo crouched in foxholes to defend the Philippines against invading Japanese soldiers in World War II. He watched a Japanese guard stab one of his comrades to death with a bayonet during the Bataan Death March. Though Pablo risked his life for the U.S., which controlled the Philippines as a commonwealth at the time, his children can't win approval to live with him in America during his retirement.
MAGAZINE
June 3, 1990 | Amy Wallace, Amy Wallace is a reporter for the San Diego edition of The Times.
EVERYBODY IN LA JOLLA knew the Brodericks. Daniel T. Broderick III and his wife, Betty, seemed to have a classic society-page marriage. Dan was a celebrity in local legal circles. Armed with degrees from both Harvard Law School and Cornell School of Medicine, the prominent malpractice attorney was aggressive, persuasive and cunning--a $1-million-a-year lawyer at the top of his game.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 21, 1995 | JORGE G. CASTANEDA, Jorge G. Castaneda, a Mexican political scientist, is writing a biography of Che Guevara that will be published in the United States by Alfred A. Knopf
It is, of course, only a coincidence that the same week the United States was submerged in a Beatles-inspired wave of nostalgia for the 1960s, one of the most emblematic symbols of those times, Ernesto "Che" Guevara, reappeared in the news when a Bolivian general acknowledged that the leftist revolutionary had been buried, not incinerated, in Bolivia, after he was executed for his antigovernment activities in 1967.
OPINION
December 14, 2006
Re "Larger U.S. effort in Iraq is proposed," Dec. 13 A proposed troop increase is an attempt to save face in light of an inevitable reality: The U.S. is going to withdraw from Iraq with less than what it would consider a total victory. Whether this means our definition of victory needs to change or our willingness to use military force needs to be reexamined is a question best left to historians and policymakers in the post-Iraq war world. What is critical to understand now is that any policy prolonging our presence in Iraq does not serve our national interest and represents a dangerous disconnection from reality.
SPORTS
October 30, 2006 | Mike Bresnahan, Times Staff Writer
Jerry Buss sat back in his jeans, casual shirt and an unlaced pair of high-tops, perched comfortably in his living room and flanked by an army of Remington statues as he discussed the future of the Lakers. He acknowledged starting the gradual process of transferring control of the team to his daughter, Jeanie, and son Jim. He said he wanted the recently repaired Phil Jackson to stay beyond the length of a contract that ends after next season.
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