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BUSINESS
January 21, 2006 | From Associated Press
Sony Electronics Inc. said it would close its television tube factory in San Diego in June, eliminating about 400 jobs. The move reflects the sagging fortunes of cathode-ray tube televisions -- the boxy, old-style sets that are being replaced by TVs sleek enough to hang on living room walls. The San Diego plant makes glass tubes for 27- and 32-inch conventional televisions assembled in Mexico.
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BUSINESS
May 7, 2013 | By Richard Verrier, Los Angeles Times
Raymond Smith Jr. has been trying for nearly two decades to make the movie industry listen to the needs of the deaf and hard of hearing. This month, the senior executive at Regal Entertainment Group will come closer to his goal. His company, the nation's largest theater chain, will have nearly 6,000 theater screens equipped with closed-captioning glasses that could transform the theatrical experience for millions of deaf and hard-of-hearing patrons who have shunned going to the cinema because previous aids were too clunky or embarrassing to use. PHOTOS: Hollywood Backlot moments The Knoxville, Tenn., chain has invested more than $10 million in the glasses, which were developed by Sony Electronics Inc. Resembling thick sunglasses, the device uses holographic technology to project closed-caption text that appears inside the lenses, synchronized with the dialogue on the screen . The system also includes headphones connected to a wireless receiver, with separate audio channels, which play dialogue or allow visually impaired users to listen to a narration track of the film.
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BUSINESS
February 13, 2003 | P.J. Huffstutter
Expanding its push into Hollywood, Sony Electronics Inc. is expected to announce today a new high-definition digital camera system aimed at moviemakers looking to shoot scenes involving complex and detailed special-effects shots. The $115,000 HDC-F950 camera is an extension of the Park Ridge, N.J., company's Cinealta line of high-def digital video equipment, which is being used by a growing number of budget-conscious TV and film productions.
BUSINESS
January 21, 2006 | From Associated Press
Sony Electronics Inc. said it would close its television tube factory in San Diego in June, eliminating about 400 jobs. The move reflects the sagging fortunes of cathode-ray tube televisions -- the boxy, old-style sets that are being replaced by TVs sleek enough to hang on living room walls. The San Diego plant makes glass tubes for 27- and 32-inch conventional televisions assembled in Mexico.
BUSINESS
September 14, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Sony Fixes Glitch in Digital Satellite Dish: Sony Electronics Inc. said it is resuming shipments of its 18-inch digital satellite systems after several hundred customer complaints prompted the company to halt shipments. The system is used instead of cable television to receive sports, movies and other programs. Customers have complained of frozen pictures and horizontal lines on their screens. Sony said it worked with program providers--GM Hughes Electronics Corp.'s DirecTv Inc.
BUSINESS
July 11, 1996 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Low-Cost Internet Access Device Unveiled: WebTV Networks Inc., a Silicon Valley start-up, blasted ahead of computer industry veterans that have talked about the idea of a low-cost World Wide Web browser for months but have not delivered. The firm demonstrated its device and announced two powerful partners: Sony Electronics Inc. and Philips Consumer Electronics Co., which will begin selling products based on the technology in September.
BUSINESS
March 16, 2005 | From a Times Staff Writer
Sony Electronics Inc. and Landmark Theatre Corp. announced a deal to equip all of the art house chain's 59 theaters with high-definition digital projectors. Landmark, which operates art house cinemas in 22 markets, is a subsidiary of 2929 Entertainment, owned by Dallas billionaire Mark Cuban and partner Todd Wagner. Terms weren't announced.
BUSINESS
May 7, 2013 | By Richard Verrier, Los Angeles Times
Raymond Smith Jr. has been trying for nearly two decades to make the movie industry listen to the needs of the deaf and hard of hearing. This month, the senior executive at Regal Entertainment Group will come closer to his goal. His company, the nation's largest theater chain, will have nearly 6,000 theater screens equipped with closed-captioning glasses that could transform the theatrical experience for millions of deaf and hard-of-hearing patrons who have shunned going to the cinema because previous aids were too clunky or embarrassing to use. PHOTOS: Hollywood Backlot moments The Knoxville, Tenn., chain has invested more than $10 million in the glasses, which were developed by Sony Electronics Inc. Resembling thick sunglasses, the device uses holographic technology to project closed-caption text that appears inside the lenses, synchronized with the dialogue on the screen . The system also includes headphones connected to a wireless receiver, with separate audio channels, which play dialogue or allow visually impaired users to listen to a narration track of the film.
BUSINESS
April 4, 2001 | JON HEALEY
Bucking the trend among personal computer makers, Sony is expected to report this month that PC sales for the first three months of 2001 were 20% higher than a year ago. Fujio Nishida, president and chief operating officer of Sony Electronics Inc., said the company's results reflect its emphasis on entertainment-oriented devices that appeal to consumers.
NEWS
January 17, 2002 | Ashley Dunn
Sony Electronics Inc. this week announced the introduction of a new Clie hand-held computer that can double as a universal remote control. The $400 color PEG-T615C can control home entertainment components from up to 15 feet away using its infrared port. The device, which comes with 16 megabytes of internal memory, will be available in February. * Ashley Dunn
BUSINESS
March 16, 2005 | From a Times Staff Writer
Sony Electronics Inc. and Landmark Theatre Corp. announced a deal to equip all of the art house chain's 59 theaters with high-definition digital projectors. Landmark, which operates art house cinemas in 22 markets, is a subsidiary of 2929 Entertainment, owned by Dallas billionaire Mark Cuban and partner Todd Wagner. Terms weren't announced.
BUSINESS
February 13, 2003 | P.J. Huffstutter
Expanding its push into Hollywood, Sony Electronics Inc. is expected to announce today a new high-definition digital camera system aimed at moviemakers looking to shoot scenes involving complex and detailed special-effects shots. The $115,000 HDC-F950 camera is an extension of the Park Ridge, N.J., company's Cinealta line of high-def digital video equipment, which is being used by a growing number of budget-conscious TV and film productions.
BUSINESS
July 11, 1996 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Low-Cost Internet Access Device Unveiled: WebTV Networks Inc., a Silicon Valley start-up, blasted ahead of computer industry veterans that have talked about the idea of a low-cost World Wide Web browser for months but have not delivered. The firm demonstrated its device and announced two powerful partners: Sony Electronics Inc. and Philips Consumer Electronics Co., which will begin selling products based on the technology in September.
BUSINESS
September 14, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Sony Fixes Glitch in Digital Satellite Dish: Sony Electronics Inc. said it is resuming shipments of its 18-inch digital satellite systems after several hundred customer complaints prompted the company to halt shipments. The system is used instead of cable television to receive sports, movies and other programs. Customers have complained of frozen pictures and horizontal lines on their screens. Sony said it worked with program providers--GM Hughes Electronics Corp.'s DirecTv Inc.
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