Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSony Music
IN THE NEWS

Sony Music

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
August 2, 2002 | Jeff Leeds
Sony Music Entertainment, whose artist roster includes such acts as Bruce Springsteen and Shakira, is terminating about 100 employees across several divisions. The move follows Sony's announcement last week that its music division had a quarterly loss of $86 million for the three months ended June 30, down from a $37-million profit a year earlier. The cuts affect about 2% of Sony Music's U.S. work force.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
June 7, 2013 | By Chris O'Brien
Apple has signed a deal with Sony Music to participate in the iRadio streaming music service the company is expected to announce Monday at its developers conference in San Francisco. A source close to the negotiations independetly confirmed the deal on Friday, though terms were not disclosed. The deal had previously been reported by All Things D. Apple has now signed up three major labels for its music streaming service, including Warner Music Group and Universal Music, whose deals were confirmed earlier this week.  PHOTOS: Tech giants' new headquarters Apple has not signed a deal yet with Sony/ATV, the music publishing unit.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
December 2, 2005 | Charles Duhigg, Times Staff Writer
Sony Music is expected to announce shortly a shake-up at two of its largest labels that will include the departure of the head of its Columbia Records unit. The changes were confirmed by three company executives. They said Will Botwin would be replaced at Columbia by Steve Barnett, who would move over from Sony's Epic Records label. Charlie Walk, executive vice president of creative marketing and promotion at Columbia, would head Epic.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 2013 | By Daniel Miller
Sony Entertainment Inc. CEO Michael Lynton has renewed his contract. Lynton also is chairman and chief executive of Sony Pictures Entertainment. He joined Sony Pictures as chairman in January 2004. Lynton oversees Sony Pictures with Amy Pascal, co-chairman of the studio. He was appointed to the additional role of CEO of Sony Entertainment in March 2012. PHOTOS: Celebrities by The Times “I am grateful to work with some of the finest minds in the entertainment business, starting with my partner at Sony Pictures, Amy Pascal, as well as Doug Morris at Sony Music and Marty Bandier at Sony/ATV," Lynton said in a statement.
BUSINESS
January 11, 1994
Sony Music Entertainment President Thomas D. Mottola announced a batch of appointments Monday aimed at rewarding his team of senior executives with bigger titles and responsibilities as well as accelerating the development of Sony's worldwide music companies. Key among the changes will be elevating three Sony presidents to chairmen of their respective units.
BUSINESS
July 18, 2001 | Jeff Leeds
Sony Music has filed a lawsuit against country stars the Dixie Chicks, accusing the Grammy-winning act of making a "sham" attempt to escape from its record contract. According to the lawsuit, filed in U.S. District Court in New York, the act still owes Sony four albums. If the group doesn't fulfill its obligations, the complaint says, Sony will suffer damages of at least $100 million.
BUSINESS
February 21, 1995
Longtime music industry figure Peter Asher, whose career has ranged from pop star to managing such artists as Linda Ronstadt and James Taylor, is expected to be named a senior vice president with Sony Music Entertainment as early as this week. Asher will report to Sony Music President Thomas D. Mottola, and will be based in New York.
BUSINESS
September 21, 1993 | JAMES BATES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sony Music Entertainment on Monday rewarded Thomas D. Mottola, head of its domestic music operation, with a promotion to president and chief operating officer, a move that gives him added responsibility for the company's international music operations. The promotion is a vindication of sorts for Mottola, 43, who had to convince industry skeptics that he was capable of running the huge company after working as an artist manager.
BUSINESS
March 1, 2003 | From Bloomberg News
Sony Corp.'s Sony Music Entertainment unit, which ranked fourth in U.S. album sales last year, bought a minority stake in Internet music service rival MusicNet. Sony Music, co-owner of the Pressplay online subscription-music service with Vivendi Universal, bought a MusicNet note that is convertible into a 4% stake in the venture.
BUSINESS
September 23, 1997 | Chuck Philips
In a move to cut costs, New York-based Sony Music will dismiss an estimated three dozen employees this week from its Epic and Columbia record labels and its Sony Music distribution sector. The firings are part of a realignment that began last week with the replacement of Epic Records President Richard Griffiths with Sony's 550 Music chief Polly Anthony.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 3, 2012 | RANDALL ROBERTS, POP MUSIC CRITIC
Of all people, it was an over-the-top rapper named Riff Raff who recently shared an insight that typified the state of music halfway through 2012, a year that has already seen revelation after revelation from many corners of the pop music spectrum. The tattooed white rapper with gold teeth, many crooked tattoos and an obviously concocted street patois (the rapper is originally from Minnesota), would have been considered a black-face performer a century ago, but today he explains that his outlandish approach to music is really all about branding.
BUSINESS
May 27, 2011 | Ben Fritz
Declining home entertainment revenue and the box-office failure of the costly comedy "How Do You Know" drove Sony Pictures' revenue down 8% in the recently ended fiscal year. However, improvements in the studio's television business kept operating income roughly flat. Mixed news for Sony Pictures came amid other bad news for Japanese parent company Sony Corp., which had to take a huge charge tied to the Japan earthquake in the fiscal year that ended March 31 and will be hurt in its current year by the hacking-induced shutdown of its online networks.
BUSINESS
March 3, 2011 | By Alex Pham, Los Angeles Times
Doug Morris has been named the new chief executive of Sony Music Entertainment, an appointment that was widely expected when Morris last year said he would step down as head of Universal Music Group at the end of 2010. Morris, 72, will succeed Rolf Schmidt-Holz on July 1, and Schmidt-Holz will exit Sony at the end of the month, when his contract expires. In the interim, Sony Corp. Chairman Howard Stringer will helm the music company. In a high-level corporate talent swap, a number of Sony executives are expected to move to Universal over the next few months, including Barry Weiss, the chairman of Sony's RCA/Jive Label Group, who is expected to lead Universal's operations in New York.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 4, 2010 | By Chris Lee, Los Angeles Times
With attention still fixated on the identity of the new judges on Fox's "American Idol," producers Tuesday sent another signal that they're taking the show in a new direction by announcing a recording distribution deal with Universal Music Group, ending a long relationship with Sony Music. Under the agreement, UMG's Interscope Geffen A&M Records will distribute, promote and market albums from "Idol" finalists and winners starting next year when the show's 10th season launches. Sony's deal expired after the ninth season ended in May. Few details were announced, including the cost of the contract, but if UMG's deal is similar to the one Sony had, the company will have right of first refusal for the final 12 contestants on "American Idol."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 12, 2010 | By Dennis McLellan, Los Angeles Times
Bob Mercer, a music industry executive who was managing director of EMI Music in Britain in the 1970s and most recently was chief executive of the "Now That's What I Call Music!" venture that releases a bestselling series of hit-single compilation albums, has died. He was 65. Mercer died of lung cancer May 5 at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles, said his wife, Margie. As chief executive of "Now That's What I Call Music!," Mercer presided over an enterprise that has sold 77 million albums in the United States since its debut in 1998.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 16, 2010 | By Chris Lee
Administrators of Michael Jackson's estate and his longtime record label, Sony Music Entertainment, Monday announced a seven-year distribution deal for as many as 10 new Jackson projects, including unreleased recordings, DVDs and perhaps even video games, valued at as much as $250 million. "We and Sony feel that the future for Michael Jackson is unlimited," said John Branca, a special administrator for the estate. Rob Stringer, chairman of the Columbia Epic label group, a division of Sony, described the deal as a landmark for the recording industry.
BUSINESS
May 18, 1995 | CHUCK PHILIPS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Driven by strong sales from superstars Pearl Jam and Mariah Carey, Sony Music Entertainment sold more than $5.6 billion worth of albums around the world in the fiscal year ended March 31. The New York-based firm, which recently dropped from second to third place in the domestic quarterly market-share race, generated more than $500 million last year in operating profit for its parent company, Sony Corp., sources said. "It was a killer year," said Sony Music CEO Thomas D.
BUSINESS
November 10, 1995 | JIM BATES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sony Corp.'s music and film businesses posted $95.2 million in operating income in the quarter ended Sept. 30, even though revenue was largely stagnant. Sony's results benefited from strong television performance, cost-cutting, such films as "The Net" and "Desperado," as well as the effects of a year-earlier cleaning up of its balance sheet with a huge write-off.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 18, 2010 | By Robert Lloyd, Television Critic
If it seems that every new TV series for young people is about pop music or pop stardom, two shows that begin tonight will do nothing to dispel the impression. In Nickelodeon's "Big Time Rush," four friends from Minnesota travel to Los Angeles to be molded into a boy band. "I'm in the Band," on the boy-centric Disney XD -- "hyper-marketing to boys" is the phrase the network actually uses -- is about a guitar-shredding teenager who talks his way into an aging metal band. Like most screen stories of show-biz kids -- going back to "Babes in Arms" and "Fame" (the series)
ENTERTAINMENT
November 5, 2009 | Todd Martens
The two-disc souvenir to the behind-the-scenes concert film "Michael Jackson's This Is It" bowed at No. 1 on the U.S. pop chart Wednesday. The album sold 373,000 copies for Sony Music, according to Nielsen SoundScan, leading a charge of 12 new albums on the U.S. pop 200. Meanwhile, Jackson's "Number Ones" sold an additional 32,000 copies during the last week. That album had sold more than 440,000 copies in the 10 days after his death last June, and may well end up as 2009's top-selling album.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|