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ENTERTAINMENT
November 24, 2007 | From the Associated Press
Sony Music must pay the founder of a small record company $5 million for failing to put his company's logo on reissues of Meat Loaf's "Bat Out of Hell" album, a federal appeals court ruled. Steve Popovich, 65, who started Cleveland International Records in 1977 and soon afterward signed the singer named Marvin Lee Aday, persuaded Epic Records to release the wildly successful album. Epic was owned at the time by CBS. Sony, which bought out CBS Records, paid $6.
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BUSINESS
November 2, 1994 | JAMES BATES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sony Music Entertainment Inc. said Tuesday that it signed a contract giving MTV Network worldwide rights to air the music videos of Sony's recording artists. News of the deal raised doubts about Sony's participation with other recording companies in a proposed rival music channel. Sony's announcement read like something of a peace treaty between Sony and MTV. Thomas D.
BUSINESS
May 25, 2006 | From Bloomberg News
Sony BMG Music Entertainment Inc. won a ruling that it didn't illegally use a songwriter's voice and name when it included a 10-second sample of one of her songs on an album by Jennifer Lopez. The 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in San Francisco said federal copyright law preempted singer Debra Laws' lawsuit over the use of her work in the song "All I Have" by Lopez and rapper LL Cool J.
BUSINESS
January 28, 2003 | From Bloomberg News
Yahoo Inc., which runs a group of Internet sites used by 213 million people a month, said it settled a lawsuit with Sony Music Entertainment Inc. over its Internet radio service. Sunnyvale, Calif.-based Yahoo said it would pay a one-time fee to Sony for prior use of the company's recordings on its Launchcast service. The companies also inked a licensing agreement. Financial terms weren't disclosed. Yahoo's Santa Monica-based Launch Media Inc.
BUSINESS
May 25, 2006 | From Bloomberg News
Sony BMG Music Entertainment Inc. won a ruling that it didn't illegally use a songwriter's voice and name when it included a 10-second sample of one of her songs on an album by Jennifer Lopez. The 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in San Francisco said federal copyright law preempted singer Debra Laws' lawsuit over the use of her work in the song "All I Have" by Lopez and rapper LL Cool J.
BUSINESS
May 21, 2002 | From Reuters
Technology buffs have cracked music publishing giant Sony Music Entertainment Inc.'s elaborate disc copy-protection technology with a decidedly low-tech method: scribbling around the rim of a disc with a felt-tip marker. Internet newsgroups have been circulating news of the discovery for a week, and users have pilloried Sony for deploying "high-tech" copy protection that can be defeated by paying a visit to a stationery store. "I wonder what type of copy protection will come next?"
ENTERTAINMENT
August 29, 1991 | CHUCK PHILIPS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Cartoons are not just for kids. While most animated programming is aimed at youngsters, the prime-time success of Fox-TV's "The Simpsons" seems to have sparked a new interest in sophisticated animated humor. In fact, adult-oriented cartoon projects are in development at all three major television networks, with NBC and ABC expected to deliver animated evening shows by next winter. But is the public ready for a pornographic cartoon?
ENTERTAINMENT
February 8, 1992 | CHUCK PHILIPS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In a test case that industry observers feel could revolutionize contractual relationships in the record business if successful, Luther Vandross has sued Sony Music Entertainment Inc. to end his decade-long association with Epic Records. "This case is not about money," Vandross' attorney Don Engel said Friday. "It's about artistic freedom. It's about Luther's career. He feels that Sony has pigeonholed him and has not done all it could to expand his audience."
BUSINESS
July 23, 2005 | Charles Duhigg and Walter Hamilton, Times Staff Writers
Sony BMG Music Entertainment, the nation's second-largest music company, is expected as early as Monday to agree to a settlement with New York Atty. Gen. Eliot Spitzer in a payola investigation, said sources familiar with the talks. Sony BMG is one of four record companies that Spitzer subpoenaed last fall as part of his inquiry into whether music corporations were skirting payola laws by hiring intermediaries to influence which songs were heard on public airwaves.
BUSINESS
July 9, 2005 | From Reuters
Music giant Sony/BMG has reached a licensing agreement with file-swapping service iMesh, one of the first such tie-ups since a U.S. Supreme Court decision clamping down on online copyright infringement. The deal, confirmed by iMesh, followed a high court ruling that unauthorized networks such as Grokster could be held liable for the copyright infringement of their users. Analysts said that decision added momentum to the move toward networks sanctioned by media companies.
BUSINESS
June 30, 2005 | From Reuters
Music giant Sony BMG finalized its deal with the legal file-sharing network Mashboxx, two days after a U.S. court dealt a blow to Mashboxx's unauthorized rivals such as Grokster. Mashboxx, headed by former Grokster President Wayne Rosso, is a peer-to-peer file-sharing network that requires users to pay for copyrighted songs. The companies said Wednesday that Sony BMG songs would cost 99 cents each, in line with the price charged by Apple Computer Inc.'s iTunes online music store.
BUSINESS
October 6, 2004 | From Associated Press
Sony Corp.'s Japanese music unit said it would no longer sell CDs with built-in copy protection, a technology it had been pushing for two years. Sony Music Entertainment Japan spokesman Yasushi Ide said that some new CDs would no longer carry the technology starting this month and that it would be dropped altogether beginning Nov. 17. Sony shares fell 30 cents to $34.90 on the New York Stock Exchange.
BUSINESS
May 25, 2004 | From Reuters
The European Commission objected Monday to plans by entertainment giants Sony Corp. and Bertelsmann to combine their music units. The merger of Sony Music, whose artists include Beyonce Knowles and Bruce Springsteen, and BMG, home to Britney Spears and Elvis Presley, would create one of the top firms in a $30-billion industry that has lost a fifth of its sales since 2000.
BUSINESS
January 27, 2004 | From Reuters
A contingent of independent music labels vowed to fight the proposed merger between music giants Sony Music and Bertelsmann's BMG as a crucial deadline for approval by European regulators looms. Trade group Impala, which represents 2,000 independent European music labels, said it would take its objections to the European Union this week in an effort to block the merger.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 17, 2002 | ROBERT HILBURN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Michael Jackson story has turned from sad to shameless as pop's would-be king has become pop's disgrace. By accusing Sony Music Entertainment of causing his last album to tank by failing to properly promote it, Jackson, a man perversely obsessed with his own physical appearance, has revealed a desperate, ugly side of himself. Even for someone whose name is synonymous with bizarre behavior, Jackson's latest outburst was startling--especially in its use of the race card.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 14, 1991 | PATRICK GOLDSTEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Sony Music is rolling the dice again. Just months after the record industry conglomerate signed Michael Jackson to a landmark $65 million-plus contract, Sony is concluding negotiations on a four-album deal with Aerosmith that could make the veteran band the industry's most highly paid rock group.
BUSINESS
September 12, 2003 | Jeff Leeds
Polly Anthony, president of Sony Music Entertainment's Epic Records, is leaving the label later this month after more than two decades at the company, sources said Thursday. The exit of Anthony, who joined Sony Music predecessor CBS Records in 1978, comes five months after the Japanese conglomerate made sweeping job cuts and consolidated some operations of its Columbia and Epic labels in a bid to slash $100 million in costs.
BUSINESS
April 15, 2003 | Jeff Leeds, Times Staff Writer
Sony Music promoted industry veteran Don Ienner to a newly created post as president of its U.S. division, placing the 51-year-old executive at the helm of a sprawling operation that releases albums from a diverse roster of acts including the Offspring, Nas and Good Charlotte.
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