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BUSINESS
August 22, 2000 | KAREN KAPLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Alex, I'll take 50% of the Game Show Network for $275 million. AT&T Corp.'s Liberty Digital and Sony Pictures Entertainment agreed Monday to a deal that could turn the Game Show Network into the first fully interactive television network, allowing viewers and Web surfers to compete in game shows against each other and in-studio contestants.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 17, 2014 | By Daniel Miller
Layoffs are underway at Sony Pictures Entertainment, the Sony Corp.-owned film and television studio that vowed late last year to significantly reduce its overhead. The cuts, which began Monday and will continue this week, include employees at divisions throughout the studio, according to a source with knowledge of the matter. The layoffs were felt at the studio's Culver City headquarters and at international offices. Among the divisions said to be deeply affected by the staff reductions is Sony Pictures Interactive, the studio's digital marketing arm.  "We are continuously evolving the business to make SPE more efficient and competitive," Sony Pictures spokesman Charles Sipkins said in a statement.  PHOTOS: Behind the scenes of movies and TV At an investors conference in November, Sony Pictures executives outlined  $250 million in budget cuts that were already underway.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 17, 2014 | By Daniel Miller
Layoffs are underway at Sony Pictures Entertainment, the Sony Corp.-owned film and television studio that vowed late last year to significantly reduce its overhead. The cuts, which began Monday and will continue this week, include employees at divisions throughout the studio, according to a source with knowledge of the matter. The layoffs were felt at the studio's Culver City headquarters and at international offices. Among the divisions said to be deeply affected by the staff reductions is Sony Pictures Interactive, the studio's digital marketing arm.  "We are continuously evolving the business to make SPE more efficient and competitive," Sony Pictures spokesman Charles Sipkins said in a statement.  PHOTOS: Behind the scenes of movies and TV At an investors conference in November, Sony Pictures executives outlined  $250 million in budget cuts that were already underway.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 30, 2012 | By Andrew Khouri, Los Angeles Times
What's 94 feet tall, more than 100,000 pounds and made of steel? Well, in Culver City it's … a rainbow. Sony Pictures Entertainment plans to unveil a towering $1.6-million rainbow art installation Monday, a massive mix of colors that the town's mayor hopes visitors and residents will come to view as a landmark for the once-sleepy suburb that's now home to a bustling restaurant and arts scene. Rising from Sony's downtown-adjacent lot, the art piece, which last week was encased in white cloth, occupies a prominent position in low-slung Culver City when viewed from the nearby Baldwin Hills Scenic Overlook.
BUSINESS
August 8, 1991 | ALAN CITRON
The famous torch lady of Columbia Pictures Entertainment Co. got a new moniker Wednesday as the board unanimously voted to rename the company Sony Pictures Entertainment. The name change is designed to lessen confusion between the parent company and its two subsidiaries--Columbia Pictures and Tri-Star Pictures. It also raises the profile of Sony Inc., the Japanese electronics giant that acquired Columbia for $3.4 billion in 1989.
BUSINESS
December 10, 2003 | Claudia Eller, Times Staff Writer
Former Walt Disney Co. executive Michael Lynton is expected to be named chief executive of Sony Pictures Entertainment, sources familiar with the situation say. At the same time, Amy Pascal, who heads Columbia Pictures, will be promoted to chairwoman of Columbia TriStar Motion Picture Group, the sources say. Lynton and Pascal would run the studio in partnership, both reporting to New York-based Sony Corp. of America Chairman and CEO Howard Stringer.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 30, 2012 | By Andrew Khouri, Los Angeles Times
What's 94 feet tall, more than 100,000 pounds and made of steel? Well, in Culver City it's … a rainbow. Sony Pictures Entertainment plans to unveil a towering $1.6-million rainbow art installation Monday, a massive mix of colors that the town's mayor hopes visitors and residents will come to view as a landmark for the once-sleepy suburb that's now home to a bustling restaurant and arts scene. Rising from Sony's downtown-adjacent lot, the art piece, which last week was encased in white cloth, occupies a prominent position in low-slung Culver City when viewed from the nearby Baldwin Hills Scenic Overlook.
BUSINESS
August 21, 2009 | Chris Lee
Aiming to create a cinematic happening for its newly acquired Michael Jackson movie, Sony Pictures Entertainment announced Thursday that "Michael Jackson: This Is It" will be released in a limited two-week run, and moved up its opening by two days to Oct. 28. In an attempt to stoke fan anticipation for the film, the studio is taking the unusual step of putting tickets on sale Sept. 27, more than a month before the film arrives at multiplexes. The movie draws on more than 80 hours of behind-the-scenes and rehearsal footage shot in the buildup to Jackson's sold-out London concerts, which were to begin last month.
BUSINESS
May 10, 2011 | By Dawn C. Chmielewski, Los Angeles Times
Google Inc.'s YouTube dramatically expanded its movie rental service with the addition of 3,000 titles from major Hollywood studios, positioning the dominant online video service to capitalize on the growing number of Internet-connected televisions and portable devices. YouTube head Salar Kamangar notified the site's estimated 105 million U.S. users via a blog post Monday that they would be able to watch "full-length blockbuster films," read reviews and catch behind-the-scenes videos on the site.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 18, 2003
Two Miramax films, "Chicago" and "Gangs of New York," are among the six nominated for the producer of the year award by the Producers Guild of America. They will compete for top honors with New Line Cinema's "Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers," IFC Films' "My Big Fat Greek Wedding," Columbia/Sony Picture Entertainment's "Adaptation" and DreamWorks' "Road to Perdition." This is the first time six movies have been nominated in the feature film category, a result of two tying for fifth place.
BUSINESS
May 10, 2011 | By Dawn C. Chmielewski, Los Angeles Times
Google Inc.'s YouTube dramatically expanded its movie rental service with the addition of 3,000 titles from major Hollywood studios, positioning the dominant online video service to capitalize on the growing number of Internet-connected televisions and portable devices. YouTube head Salar Kamangar notified the site's estimated 105 million U.S. users via a blog post Monday that they would be able to watch "full-length blockbuster films," read reviews and catch behind-the-scenes videos on the site.
BUSINESS
August 21, 2009 | Chris Lee
Aiming to create a cinematic happening for its newly acquired Michael Jackson movie, Sony Pictures Entertainment announced Thursday that "Michael Jackson: This Is It" will be released in a limited two-week run, and moved up its opening by two days to Oct. 28. In an attempt to stoke fan anticipation for the film, the studio is taking the unusual step of putting tickets on sale Sept. 27, more than a month before the film arrives at multiplexes. The movie draws on more than 80 hours of behind-the-scenes and rehearsal footage shot in the buildup to Jackson's sold-out London concerts, which were to begin last month.
BUSINESS
December 10, 2003 | Claudia Eller, Times Staff Writer
Former Walt Disney Co. executive Michael Lynton is expected to be named chief executive of Sony Pictures Entertainment, sources familiar with the situation say. At the same time, Amy Pascal, who heads Columbia Pictures, will be promoted to chairwoman of Columbia TriStar Motion Picture Group, the sources say. Lynton and Pascal would run the studio in partnership, both reporting to New York-based Sony Corp. of America Chairman and CEO Howard Stringer.
BUSINESS
August 22, 2000 | KAREN KAPLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Alex, I'll take 50% of the Game Show Network for $275 million. AT&T Corp.'s Liberty Digital and Sony Pictures Entertainment agreed Monday to a deal that could turn the Game Show Network into the first fully interactive television network, allowing viewers and Web surfers to compete in game shows against each other and in-studio contestants.
BUSINESS
August 8, 1991 | ALAN CITRON
The famous torch lady of Columbia Pictures Entertainment Co. got a new moniker Wednesday as the board unanimously voted to rename the company Sony Pictures Entertainment. The name change is designed to lessen confusion between the parent company and its two subsidiaries--Columbia Pictures and Tri-Star Pictures. It also raises the profile of Sony Inc., the Japanese electronics giant that acquired Columbia for $3.4 billion in 1989.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 30, 2010 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
The film landscape is changing so quickly these days with lively debates over whether to shoot in 3-D or 2-D or use digital or traditional film cameras. But a new UCLA Film and Television Archive series, "From Nitrate to Digital: New Technologies and the Art of Cinema," illustrates that technological change is the norm in Hollywood. The program, which opens Saturday at the Billy Wilder Theater, "is about reminding people that the industry has been through these changes before and Hollywood and artists have adapted and adopted to those transitions," notes programmer Paul Malcolm.
BUSINESS
April 16, 2003 | Claudia Eller, Times Staff Writer
If Warner Bros.' double-barreled "The Matrix" sequels hit as big as expected, Hollywood may get schooled in one of the trickier lessons of contemporary film finance: The biggest risk of all can be sharing the risk -- which can mean having to share enormous rewards.
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