Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSony Television Entertainment
IN THE NEWS

Sony Television Entertainment

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
July 19, 1995 | SALLIE HOFMEISTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sony Pictures Entertainment on Tuesday put to rest months of speculation about who would manage its television operation by naming the head of its television studio, Jon Feltheimer, to succeed Mel Harris, who will leave the company. Feltheimer, 43, is considered a top television salesman. He is credited with nearly doubling the number of new Columbia TriStar Television shows on the prime-time schedule this year, as well as the returning "Mad About You" and "The Nanny."
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
July 11, 1996 | SALLIE HOFMEISTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an unusual arrangement to shore up its weakness in distributing TV programs, Sony Television Entertainment on Wednesday formed a company with CBS and the talent management firm 3 Arts Entertainment to produce prime-time shows. While rivals such as Warner Bros., Paramount, Disney and Fox studios have bought or started TV networks to lock in shelf space for their shows, Sony has made no such alliance and lacks the cable reach of its competitors in the U.S.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
July 11, 1996 | SALLIE HOFMEISTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an unusual arrangement to shore up its weakness in distributing TV programs, Sony Television Entertainment on Wednesday formed a company with CBS and the talent management firm 3 Arts Entertainment to produce prime-time shows. While rivals such as Warner Bros., Paramount, Disney and Fox studios have bought or started TV networks to lock in shelf space for their shows, Sony has made no such alliance and lacks the cable reach of its competitors in the U.S.
BUSINESS
July 25, 1995 | SALLIE HOFMEISTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jon Feltheimer wants it all. When he came to Hollywood as a struggling musician in the mid-1970s, he played guitar in a pop band called Lightheart at night while working as a stockbroker by day. "I didn't want to be poor," he said. His driven style helps explain why after a dozen years in the television business, Feltheimer is considered among its most effective salesmen--and was catapulted last week to the top rung of Sony Television Entertainment.
BUSINESS
July 25, 1995 | SALLIE HOFMEISTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jon Feltheimer wants it all. When he came to Hollywood as a struggling musician in the mid-1970s, he played guitar in a pop band called Lightheart at night while working as a stockbroker by day. "I didn't want to be poor," he said. His driven style helps explain why after a dozen years in the television business, Feltheimer is considered among its most effective salesmen--and was catapulted last week to the top rung of Sony Television Entertainment.
BUSINESS
April 4, 1995
Ned Dowd has signed a new three-year agreement with Caravan Pictures and will continue to oversee all aspects of physical production for motion pictures created under the Caravan Pictures banner. He has served as head of production on all of Caravan Pictures' feature releases. Dowd has worked as an assistant director on 35 feature films as well as co-producing such films as "The Last of the Mohicans" and "The Three Musketeers."
BUSINESS
October 13, 1995 | SALLIE HOFMEISTER
Game Shows: All American Communications, the producer and distributor of "Baywatch," has formed a joint venture to buy Mark Goodson Productions, which owns a library of popular game shows, including "The Price Is Right," "Family Feud," "What's My Line?," "Match Game," "To Tell the Truth" and "Password." All American and the Interpublic Group, the advertising holding company that holds a 23% stake in the television production company, are spending $50 million for the game show assets.
BUSINESS
December 6, 1995 | KAREN KAPLAN
As president of Sony Corp. of America, Michael P. Schulhof oversaw the company's entry into the entertainment business in music, movies and television. A look at his record in Sony's major U.S. divisions: MUSIC Spearheaded the 1988 purchase of CBS Records--including the Columbia and Epic labels--for $2 billion. Although the acquisition was heavily second-guessed at the time, the highly profitable Sony Music Entertainment posted earnings of $5.4 billion in its most recent year. What's Next?
BUSINESS
January 12, 1996
Val Azzoli is about to be named co-chairman and co-chief executive of Time Warner's Atlantic Group, which releases music by such hit artists as Hootie & the Blowfish and Stone Temple Pilots. Azzoli's promotion from president to co-chairman is the first move made by Warner Music Group chiefs Bob Daly and Terry Semel since they were brought in to restore order at the nation's biggest record conglomerate.
BUSINESS
March 15, 1996 | SALLIE HOFMEISTER
If content is king, Sony Corp. is in an enviable position, as arguably the second-most prolific producer of TV shows in the country, after Warner Bros. But in the shifting world of television, where leverage can count as much as quality in determining what gets on the tube, Sony Television Entertainment has few chips--lacking a TV network, a station group or any major cable channels to guarantee a home for its productions.
BUSINESS
July 19, 1995 | SALLIE HOFMEISTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sony Pictures Entertainment on Tuesday put to rest months of speculation about who would manage its television operation by naming the head of its television studio, Jon Feltheimer, to succeed Mel Harris, who will leave the company. Feltheimer, 43, is considered a top television salesman. He is credited with nearly doubling the number of new Columbia TriStar Television shows on the prime-time schedule this year, as well as the returning "Mad About You" and "The Nanny."
BUSINESS
July 18, 1995 | CLAUDIA ELLER and SALLIE HOFMEISTER
Hollywood is still reeling from the surprise appointment of Ron Meyer, the president of Creative Artists Agency, as head of MCA, after his partner Michael Ovitz turned down the job. Now the buzz has quietly shifted to the fate of ultra-low-profile partner Bill Haber. The latest rumor is that Haber, who is the TV honcho at CAA, might follow Meyer to MCA, which is in desperate need of TV repair.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 11, 1996 | Brian Lowry, Brian Lowry is a Times staff writer
Leslie Moonves often wondered what it would be like to run a network entertainment division. Now that he does, the executive talks at times wistfully about life outside the fishbowl. Friends, however, say not to believe him, and even Moonves acknowledges that despite the frustration associated with being the chief programmer at third-place CBS, by and large he's having the time of his life.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|